oldman_woodworker

Making an 80 deg bevel cut on TS

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As a very amateur woodworker I often find myself puzzling over the very basics.

I have french cleat battens mounted around my shed and I wanted to make a simple project that would hold my mobile phone, I would imagine this as a small piece of cleat with a timber mount that lies at approx 80 deg or so to hold the phone ( I want the phone in an upright position but laying back a little 

 

I cannot work out how to cut a piece at 80 deg ( or anything more than 45 actually)

Am I missing something here 

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2 minutes ago, Tom King said:

Make a tall auxiliary fence, to cut it vertically, rather than laying flat.

Thanks Tom

Im still confused as to how I make the 80 deg (or so) cut, my TS only runs up to 45

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What table saw is it?  Most have a scale where the tilt control is it'll go from 90* in increments down to 45*.  Loosen the stop on the tilt part of the saw and turn the handle so the blade begins to tilt . watch the needle and stop when you've gone 10*. Lock the tilt handle and make whatever 80* cut you need.  Then return the tilted saw blade, making sure with a square that it;s at 90* again.  don't believe the marking arrow/pointer for accuracy on 90* and 45* cuts.  but you can trust a 10* movement by just counting the marks from where you start your tilt.

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3 minutes ago, RichardA said:

What table saw is it?  Most have a scale where the tilt control is it'll go from 90* in increments down to 45*.  Loosen the stop on the tilt part of the saw and turn the handle so the blade begins to tilt . watch the needle and stop when you've gone 10*. Lock the tilt handle and make whatever 80* cut you need.  Then return the tilted saw bkade, making sure with a square that it;s at 90* again.  don't believe the marking arrow/pointer for accuracy on 90* and 45* cuts.  but you can trust a 108 movement by just counting the marks from where you start your tilt.

Thanks Richard

My TS is a Sherwood brand ( I believe it could be a Rigid rebranded) its a hybrid cabinet style. I do have a digital angle gauge that I use.

Im getting myself confused with the angles, my saw gauge reads zero when the blade is at 90 deg.

I tried a cut at 10 deg this morning ( its nearly time for me to go to work) but obviously the mounting plate for the phone only stuck out at a ten deg angle, should I be making this ten deg cut vertically as Tom saiid ?

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2 minutes ago, Tpt life said:

Here is your ten degrees if you want 80° upright....and a dangerous cut on a small piece. 

5DDE0E6E-BE50-4FF3-9596-79DFFD697A89.jpeg

Thanks, I will redraw tonight, I didn't actually plan on cutting the cleat at the angle but rather the upright support ( if that make sense)

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Makes sense. Just tilt your saw 10* from 90, stand the workpiece on its head, and shave off a bit. The resulting face will attach to the cleat and give you the 80* tilt from horizontal. When thing of angle greater than 45, always remember the scale on the saw measures from a vetical line, but the work is usually horizontal. Rotating the work to a vertical position allows those angles the saw can't make in a horizontal workpiece.

 

 Helps if you have a 'tenon jig' for the saw fence. Easy to make from plywood, if you don't have one.

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Did I miss something? Why not cut it at 45* and use the offcut as the piece that goes against the wall? 

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Or ... mark the lines you want, and either handsaw or hand plane it away. A bandsaw would also do this easily. A crosscut jig on a tablesaw might work.

Regards from Perth

Derek

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What you are trying to do is similar to cutting a raised panel for a door.  Watch this video to get the technique.  It basically describes what they guys have said above:https://www.google.com/search?q=cutting+raised+panels+on+a+table+saw&rlz=1C5CHFA_enCA701CA703&oq=cutting+raised+pa&aqs=chrome.0.0j69i57j0l4.3509j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8#kpvalbx=1

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6 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

Makes sense. Just tilt your saw 10* from 90, stand the workpiece on its head, and shave off a bit. The resulting face will attach to the cleat and give you the 80* tilt from horizontal. When thing of angle greater than 45, always remember the scale on the saw measures from a vetical line, but the work is usually horizontal. Rotating the work to a vertical position allows those angles the saw can't make in a horizontal workpiece.

 

 Helps if you have a 'tenon jig' for the saw fence. Easy to make from plywood, if you don't have one.

ahhah, this is where i was getting confused, it makes more sense now

a slightly better picture of what Im trying to do

phone holder.jpg

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5 hours ago, Art said:

What you are trying to do is similar to cutting a raised panel for a door.  Watch this video to get the technique.  It basically describes what they guys have said above:https://www.google.com/search?q=cutting+raised+panels+on+a+table+saw&rlz=1C5CHFA_enCA701CA703&oq=cutting+raised+pa&aqs=chrome.0.0j69i57j0l4.3509j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8#kpvalbx=1

thanks mate, this was a good help  

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I've seen this discussion before and understand why it confuses people.  The simple math is to subtract your number from 90.

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3 hours ago, Byrdie said:

I've seen this discussion before and understand why it confuses people.  The simple math is to subtract your number from 90.

This is something I would do well to remember ! I'm also glad I'm not the only one who has been confused about this

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49 minutes ago, oldman_woodworker said:

I'm also glad I'm not the only one who has been confused about this

Your not even close to the only one. ;)  It's a rare person that hasn't been confused the first time they try to do something like this.  It's all part of the learning process.

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18 hours ago, Byrdie said:

I've seen this discussion before and understand why it confuses people.  The simple math is to subtract your number from 90.

I just watched an interesting ( to me ) tutorial video about cutting mitres to suit an odd shaped angle and how the maths could be incorrect if you split the angle in two for the angle cut measurement instead of taking the angle and subtracting it from 90, another good point to illustrate your advice on subtracting from 90

thanks again :D

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For something that size, I wouldn’t even run the table saw. I’d mark a line a grab a hand plane. Just a thought if you have any hand tools. 

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6 hours ago, Tpt life said:

For something that size, I wouldn’t even run the table saw. I’d mark a line a grab a hand plane. Just a thought if you have any hand tools. 

thanks Tpt, my hand tools don't include any planes yet, I did use an electric plane many years ago trying to make a door fit an opening and nearly turned the door into a window. Using a plane is something the craftsmen make look easy but when the average joe tries it's a very different story

 

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