walidantar

concerning chisel and dado/groove sizes

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about chisels, if i have 1/4" 1/2" & 1", are 3/8" & 3/4" needed? and for what 2" is used - is it worth it to get it a premium one or it's rarely used .. and with respect to dado's or grooves, what is the most common width in cabinet joinery 

 

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There is going to be a bunch of answers for these two questions.  What it boils down to, is what you need in your work flow. I have a bunch of tools that don't get used on every construct, but I'm glad I have them when I need them .   The most common dado width used is the one you need at the moment..

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I work mostly with power tools, but use hand tools to refine/clean-up what the power tools have done and, sometimes, to do jobs my power tools can't do.  I don't own any "premium" chisels - my basic set are 21st century-vintage Stanley Sweetheart bench chisels - 1/4, 1/2, 3/4 and 1".  For what I do, I'm not sure premium chisels make sense - I have the idea that they are for folks who use their chisels all day, every day.

I have added, as needed, some individual chisels - mostly Narex.  There is a 3/8" mortising chisel, a 1/2" dovetail chisel, and 1/4" and 1" cranked neck chisels.  For my work, I've never seen a need for a chisel wider than 1". 

Regarding dadoes - I work mostly with 3/4" stock (hence, the 3/8" mortising chisel), so 3/4" dadoes are common.  In drawers, I usually use 1/4" plywood bottoms, so 1/4" dadoes are also common.

As @RichardA said, what you need depends on what work you do.

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1 hour ago, RichardA said:

There is going to be a bunch of answers for these two questions.  What it boils down to, is what you need in your work flow. I have a bunch of tools that don't get used on every construct, but I'm glad I have them when I need them .   The most common dado width used is the one you need at the moment..

Ding, ding, ding.  Agreed.  Like router bits, there are a few basic chisels and then dozens of "other" chisels.

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My best advice is to use what you have and when you reach a point in a project where you need something different buy it. I have spent $$$$ buying tools that don't get used now I buy a tool when I need it.

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+1 on the metric chisels.  and +1 on a router plane if you are going to cut a lot of dados with hand tools.

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I have too many sizes that I have collected over the years, but when I replaced my everyday chisels with premium chisels, I got 1/8, 1/4, 3/8, 1/2, 3/4 and 1 inch chisels. I use the 1/4 and 3/8's on dovetails, the 1/2, and 3/4 for general paring and the 1 inch for flushing things to the surface. I probably use my 1/2" more than any other. The 1/8" chisel is for nitpicky cleanup tasks. These chisels handle 90% of my woodworking tasks. the

On top of those, I have a couple of skew chisels, a couple of Japanese chisels for fine dovetailing, a fishtail chisel, a set of mortice chisels.... Having Tool Acquisition Syndrome does not make this an easy write....

Hi, I'm Robby and I am a tool addict

It doesn't help that Lie-Nielsen has there tool event less than two miles from house every February.

I have actually started giving some away to friends that are starting out on their woodworking journey.

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I have two sets of the same 4 chisels, both a local tool sellers version.  I keep one in the shop and one in the basement where I tend to do some work when it's too cold.  They have .25 .5 .75 and 1" in the set and I haven't really found I need anything else.

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There are two basic rules of operation for a chisel you need.  The one you need is the one you don't have, or you have so many that you know you have one that size, but can't find it.  I have two toolboxes full of chisels.  Chisel 1 has at least 6 rolls of chisels in it. 

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Just now, Tom King said:

There are two basic rules of operation for a chisel you need.  The one you need is the one you don't have, or you have so many that you know you have one that size, but can't find it.  I have two toolboxes full of chisels.  Chisel 1 has at least 6 rolls of chisels in it. 

100% true.  The ancillary rule is that if you find the one you need, it'll be the one your wife, girlfriend, neighbor or other fiend used to open a paint can thus needing a total resharpening. (And, no, I did not misspell "friend.")

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In a real low-budget situation, I'd start with a 1/4 or metric equivalent "bench" chisel. You can always make a bigger hole with a smaller chisel, but it doesn't work the other way around. I prefer longer irons, because I tend to pare more than pound.

Second, I would invest in a quality 3/8 mortising chisel. Quality, because you WILL pound the crap out of it. MY Robert Sorby was a bit pricey, but it takes a beating and retains an edge like you wouldn't believe.

Last, a 1" chisel, this one really is for paring, so long iron, or even a crank-neck, is worth considering.

Also, keep in mind that seldom-used sizes can be made from old chisels that are a bit wider. A bench top belt sander is great for taking material off the sides without overheating too quickly. Hit the flea markets and garage sales for beaters that you can customize.

 

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3 hours ago, Robby W said:

Hi, I'm Robby and I am a tool addict

Hi Robby.

Are there cookies and coffee after this meeting.

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I bought the Narex set, up to 2", and find that it makes life much easier.  I'm lazy/bad about sharpening, so I find that having a whole bunch of sharp chisels, which a full set allows me to have,  lets me keep working.  When I run out of sharp ones, then I can dedicate a hour or so to sharpening the whole set. I have also found the big ones (1 1/2" and 2") to be surprising useful for paring. 

Overall, Narex is reasonably affordable and I don't every see myself buying a really premium set, and it really helps my workflow.  Having said that, I have certainly found myself in situations where I would have liked to have some of the more specialized chisesl (mortise, fishtail, etc), so I'll likely start buying those individually as needed. 

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8 hours ago, RichardA said:

Who are you calling "dear"?

meaning is like sir, it's not my language so often i get in words that gets misunderstood 

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59 minutes ago, Art said:

I bought the Narex set, up to 2", and find that it makes life much easier.  I'm lazy/bad about sharpening, so I find that having a whole bunch of sharp chisels, which a full set allows me to have,  lets me keep working.  When I run out of sharp ones, then I can dedicate a hour or so to sharpening the whole set. I have also found the big ones (1 1/2" and 2") to be surprising useful for paring. 

Overall, Narex is reasonably affordable and I don't every see myself buying a really premium set, and it really helps my workflow.  Having said that, I have certainly found myself in situations where I would have liked to have some of the more specialized chisesl (mortise, fishtail, etc), so I'll likely start buying those individually as needed. 

what can you par with wide chisels? 

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25 minutes ago, walidantar said:

meaning is like sir, it's not my language so often i get in words that gets misunderstood 

He ain’t bitching, it’s just the nicest thing anyone has ever said to him:D! You’re good! 

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26 minutes ago, walidantar said:

what can you par with wide chisels? 

Tenon cheeks, for one. rabbets, too. Anything done with a plane can be done with a chisel, although with less consistency. 

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