Chip Sawdust

Just bought a little lathe...

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Sure people file/sand their tool rests.  I have tried waxing, but found it got gummy with sawdust.

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I sanded/filed my tool rest. It’s an old lathe and over the years has picked up some nicks and scratches that the gouge would occasionally snag on. I have a couple gouges that had particularly sharp corners along the shaft, so I slightly eased those as well. These fixed the issue and I did not need to wax them, I was worried about them getting caked with sawdust and making the problem worse.

 

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I’ll start by waxing and see how it goes then :) 

i took my “huge spindle” and turned it into a couple potential bowl blanks. Anyone recommend cutting some 45 degree corners to ease the shaping?

 

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Am I ever so glad I don’t own a lathe. Not only does it sound expensive but complicated as well! 

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Here's a trick for rounding the blank.  Start by cutting out a circle (of proper size) from heavy cardboard or thin plywood.  Lay the half cylinder on the flat side then tack the circle to curved side.  Now you have a guide to rough out a round blank on the bandsaw.  

You can open either side of the blank.  Keep in mind that you still have the pith so you may still have a crack.  Try and dry them slowly.

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Thanks Mark I’ll do just that. Good idea, thank you. 

@K Cooper it’s fun though! And no more expensive than a table saw to be frank... 

That said, I just saw Amazon delivered my G3 chuck today so I can’t wait to head home and see that little gem :) 

i ordered a copy of Raffan’s book and they sent me a book about making bandsaw boxes! Couldn’t care much less about that, so re-ordered and it’ll be here tomorrow. Then I’m hoping not to look so much like a noob with a lathe (even if I am) :) 

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Ok so I set up the G3, pre-shaped a bowl blank, roughed it out and have a basic shape. It’s not gong to make the grade due to some flaws I can already see, but as an experiment on using the G3 and my bowl gouge, it’s teaching me a few things. 

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This crack is going to kill this bowl I can see...

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I drew a few lines on the bottom for grip, but mostly “just to see.”

443CF3DD-AC3E-4A67-B544-A741F03597A8.jpeg

The inner surface is half fuzz, anyone got ideas how to smooth that out?

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21 hours ago, Mark J said:

Here's a trick for rounding the blank.  Start by cutting out a circle (of proper size) from heavy cardboard or thin plywood.  Lay the half cylinder on the flat side then tack the circle to curved side.  Now you have a guide to rough out a round blank on the bandsaw.  

You can open either side of the blank.  Keep in mind that you still have the pith so you may still have a crack.  Try and dry them slowly.

I ended up drawing a circle on the flat side, marking some lines across it that I drew part way up the side, then ran it through the band saw at the various points. I have a 5/8” blade in the band saw so circles aren’t very tight. It wasn’t as good an idea as your cardboard tip but I confess to being a bit boneheaded sometimes. 

I wish I could post a video here as I want to do a time lapse on the next blank :) 

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Run some thin CA into the crack to strengthen it up, then some medium CA behind it to fill the gaps. Let it cure overnight, the CA will not be cured on the inside near as fast as the outside.

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I’d guess that you need to sharpen your gouge. Changing your cutting angle or taking lighter cuts may help reduce the fuzz, but a sharp gouge is the best way.

Lathe tools need very frequent sharpening, especially on larger diameter items. You get up into hundreds and thousands of linear feet of cutting surprisingly fast.

With bowls, half of the cut will be end grain. Less than sharp tools will leave the end grain parts fuzzy.

The TWWG bowl turning project has a lot of good info, tips, and techniques. 

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I finally received Raffan’s book and after reading the sharpening chapter I went directly to the shop and started grinding. I’m not half bad at a grinder by hand/eye, so in the end I was able to put a nice fingernail shape on my 1/2” spindle gouge, as well as all the other chisels with their recommended grinds. Worked much better :) 

This wood is quite green and I almost feel moisture on my face from it in some areas, but there is less fuzz now than before. Also, curly shavings instead of dusty ones. 

Its weird taking an edge from the grinder straight to my work. With joinery I set up and spend good time getting that razor’s edge; this is completely different. 

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On 5/14/2019 at 8:35 AM, JohnG said:

The TWWG bowl turning project has a lot of good info, tips, and techniques. 

TWWG? The Wood Whisperer Group? 

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So it’s not as small a lathe as it was, the 24” extension came in, now I have to reorganize the shop! 

But i can finally do something with these branch cutoffs....

 

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Dust collection is the next thing after I get the turning bench set up. I’m thinking a sliding hood that has a handle sticking out underneath the lathe so I can move it along, keeping it opposite of my tool rest and behind. Also maybe a barrier to keep chips from flying even beyond that, so I may make a small “wall” behind the lathe. The turning bench will be against a shop wall, no doubt. 

If anyone has ideas on any of that, I’m wide open to suggestions :) 

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I believe the only effective way to control the lathe mess in your shop is to mount the machine on a mobile base, and do all your turning out in the driveway!  :D

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Ok I think I’m starting to catch on :) 

i modified my flip top bench and put this long piece of equipment on that. It gets almost a whole wall in my little shop area. Relocated the band saw, still need a place to mount the planer and jointer. But for now I need to build a couple drawers for the “new” bench and continue with the reorganization. It’s a mess right now so I can’t get my next project started....

As for dust collection, so far I’ve waited till I’m done turning then grab the hose end from the TS and start vacuuming up the area. So no dust collection during the work, although I will have to try something.... eventually....

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I was in Rockler yesterday and walked past the laths.... i quickly kept walking once i saw some of the price tags on the hss tools and what not.

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On 5/19/2019 at 9:02 AM, Chestnut said:

I was in Rockler yesterday and walked past the laths.... i quickly kept walking once i saw some of the price tags on the hss tools and what not.

Yeah, but Rockler, while convenient (for me anyway) is so overpriced.  I only go there for immediate needs anymore.  Penn State Industries, Penturningz and Amazon have saved me a small fortune over Rockler, so long as I have patience.  For example:

https://www.rockler.com/nova-30th-anniversary-g3-reversible-chuck-bundle-with-3-jaw-sets-and-case

vs.

https://www.pennstateind.com/store/CSC3500SE.html

The same goes for pen blanks and kits.  I really get my best blank value from my local lumber yard, just not as much of a selection.  I got a 4 foot 3/4 x 3/4 blank of cocobolo for $5 there.

 

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25 minutes ago, SirNot said:

The same goes for pen blanks and kits.  I really get my best blank value from my local lumber yard, just not as much of a selection.  I got a 4 foot 3/4 x 3/4 blank of cocobolo for $5 there.

Which yard do you shop at? I stopped in at one of them and was a bit surprised at the prices in Chicagoland.

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