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12 minutes ago, Chip Sawdust said:

Furniture Making Plain and Simple by Watson and Poulos

Making Furniture Masterpieces by Gottshall

Woodworker’s Guide to Veneering and Inlay Jonathan Benson

American Furniture the Federal Period by Charles Montgomery

American Furniture of the 18th Century by Jeff Greene

Turning Wood by Richard Raffan 

The Perfect Edge by Ron Hock

Cabinetmaking and Millworker (textbook style book) by John L. Fierer 

Biulding Fine Furniture by Glen Huey

Could you give a sentence or two describing the books or giving a suggestion? Also as this is a style reference can you list the furniture style for each book as well?

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I'm still buying books, but I've either been too busy, or too tired to even look at them yet.  I haven't forgotten about this thread though.  I do know that all the style ones in Chip's list are in my stacks.

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2 hours ago, Chestnut said:

Could you give a sentence or two describing the books or giving a suggestion? Also as this is a style reference can you list the furniture style for each book as well?

Sure, I’ll give it a shot :) 

Furniture Making Plain and Simple by Watson and Poulos - This is a fairly basic book, old school stuff but some really helpful construction tips, especially if you like hand work. It helped me perfect my hand-fashioned dovetails to it’s one I put a gold star next to. It’s an older book though, no color pics or other stuff. 

Making Furniture Masterpieces by Gottshall - This has some plans for 18th century pieces, I think color pics if i recollect correctly. Nice stuff in there if you’re looking for ideas, which is why I buy some of these books. 

Woodworker’s Guide to Veneering and Inlay Jonathan Benson - This is self explanatory. The only thing it lacks is doing oval fan inlays (that I’m learning now) and bellflowers, which is my current interest for some Federal pieces. But a TON of stuff about doing veneer and more complex (larger?) inlays. Pretty well-reviewed on Amazon.

American Furniture the Federal Period by Charles Montgomery - a basic description of Federal period furniture. It’s descriptive, historical, that kind of thing. 

American Furniture of the 18th Century by Jeff Greene - this one is like the one above, descriptive and educational about history. I love reading about this stuff...

Turning Wood by Richard Raffan - Raffan is well-known as a wood turner, and he has lots of helpful instruction on turning on the lathe. I bought this right after I bought my lathe a few months ago. Good stuff, including sharpening turning tools. 

The Perfect Edge by Ron Hock - I think this is a must for any woodworker. It’s a classic in my mind. Hock makes blades for all kinds of things and is a metallurgist of sorts who describes more about sharpening than you could ever digest. 

Cabinetmaking and Millworking (textbook style book) by John L. Fierer - This was designed for teaching students as it has questions at the end of chapters, so it’s instructive. You can look up specific things in it but to be honest I haven’t read it as much as some of the others above. 

Biulding Fine Furniture by Glen Huey - This has projects for turn of the century pieces, but not solely focused on Queen Anne or Hepplewhite or arts and crafts or... or... But some very nice pieces in it. 

I’ll add to this the Encyclopedia of Furniture by Josef Aronson, which is exactly what it says, in encyclopedia. If you want to research a particular period or style, this has information and black and white pics of it. Another older book.

None of these books, except Turning and Edge I think, are for rank beginners, but you can always learn from them no matter your skill or knowledge level. I’m no expert by any means, so I can learn from anyone  :)

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On 5/6/2019 at 5:37 PM, Bmac said:

 

Second to Krenov, the books about Sam Maloof have changed my woodworking more than anything. The books I own are "The Furniture of Sam Maloof", and "Sam Maloof, Woodworker". Again, not how to books but books for inspiration. You can find out the how to through other avenues, but you get the inspiration in these books. The Mid Century Modern furniture is interesting to me, and Maloof's work is classic.

Based on your recommendation and more importantly your work I put this on my wishlist and my daughter gave it to me for my birthday today. The pictures are awesome and I totally agree with your inspiration comments. Thanks for sharing here!

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Oh geez I don’t recall anyone putting Bob Flexner’s book on wood finishing in the list. 

Flexner has made his life’s work about finishing and his book is fantastic. You have to have a copy. 

Geez now what’s the name of it? I think it’s Understanding Wood Finishing. For sure a classic.  

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49 minutes ago, pkinneb said:

Based on your recommendation and more importantly your work I put this on my wishlist and my daughter gave it to me for my birthday today. The pictures are awesome and I totally agree with your inspiration comments. Thanks for sharing here!

Happy birthday! Mine was earlier this month :) 

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I saw Lang’s book referenced and it is a great book. One of my early purchases, Brand new. 

I have to add Darryl Peart’s two books I have on G&G furniture. One is In the Greene and Greene Style, Nd the other one is Green and Greene, esbigne Elements for the Workshop. 

They both contain great tips, jigs and other info on how to stylize various points of G&G furniture. I’ve made several pieces for our house and used the information in both these books for teaching me how to make drawer pulls, ebony inserts, all sorts of finer G&G details. Good stuff. 

I have Lang”s Shop Drawings for Green and Greene Furniture and it is also a great book. The three go together like wine and cheese :) 

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I've still been buying books, but have been too busy, or too tired to look at them.  I did order another shelf for the Barrister Bookcase, and hope I can slip it in without Pam noticing.  She did tell me to stop buying books until I had somewhere to put them, but I will have somewhere now.  That bookcase will just be taller, but that room has a 10' ceiling.  https://www.ebay.com/itm/Antique-Barrister-Bookcase-Section-Sized-D-12-1-4-for-Large-Books/333150377721?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2649

Anyway, this book came, and the box it came in was so heavy that I thought it was some tool that I ordered that I didn't remember.  Thinking it was a tool, I threw the box in the back seat of the truck, and just took it out at the shop today.  It wasn't a tool, but a Very Heavy book.  It has over 600 pages, and is a very high quality printing.

Southern-Furniture-1680-1830-The-Colonial-Williamsburg-Collection

It's probably the most awesome book I've opened on Colonial Furniture.  There are Many color photographs.  They show the backs of the pieces, and pieces like chests of drawers also have pictures of the carcasses with all the drawers taken out, and pictures of tables inverted.  There are closeups of inlays.  You will see many of the original pieces that have inspired later versions that you recognize.

I've had this book in my watchlist on ebay for a good while.   They have always before been way too expensive.  I keep several of the expensive books in my watchlist, and by doing that, when another one comes up for sale, I see it, and can jump on it if the price is right.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Southern-Furniture-1680-1830-The-Colonial-Williamsburg-Collection-LG-hardcover/153568943091?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2649

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For Bill Hylton: Illustrated Cabinet Making

I will add that this book contains much more info than just cabinet making. It includes information on many types of furniture- kitchen cabinets, tables, bookcases, desks, beds, etc. It gives designs, dimensions, exploded drawings, and assembly info. It also includes ergonomic standards for the variety of furniture it covers, which is one of the main reasons I bought the book.

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Having almost exhausted the supply of Colonial Furniture books, I turned to specifically buying books on Windsor chairs.  We've all seen the how-to build books, but there are also a number of books on their history, and many pictures of examples of old ones.

This book came this week, and needs to be added to the reference list, if you can find one for a price suitable for you.  My copy of this one is like new, as the ad said.  It's HUGE, weighing in at 8-1/2 pounds.   There are many variations inside that I have never seen before, and it will be entertainment for more than a few hours of reading.

 https://www.ebay.com/itm/American-Windsor-Chairs-by-Nancy-Goyne-Evans-1st-ed-Antique-chairs-dj-like-new/193042039791?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2649

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