treesner

Cleat to attach to single stud

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Trying to figure out how to flush mount a hook piece that’s narrow and only hits one stud. Easy solution is screws through the front but I want it to be clean. I also want to be able to have normal people hang the piece themselves easily. 

Typically I use French cleats but that only works well with 2 studs. My current solution is to make a board with two screw heads sticking out and have holes to screw that’s to the wall. On the back of the piece there would be a routed out area deep enough for the clear board to fit into it, then into that would be two key holes that would hook into the clear board. 

Any better solutions for this? 

C074BA45-3A09-4652-BCF9-B6718B65A72F.thumb.jpeg.c139c4dcf51337cf90b56d149a74c6d2.jpeg

 

Example of key holes but would end up routing an area around it to let the clear board fit into itEB43CD7B-0EED-4ED4-979D-A83DAFF1B7A0.thumb.jpeg.45857327953f6954ec1e798739c94fef.jpeg

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This might be better than the keyholes. I wonder if just one of these (instead of two vertical stacked) would be strong enough and not allow the hung piece to twist (like a single keyhole on a screw would) 

0A51EF8D-2CAB-41DB-B1F4-D9C0FB4A4A39.jpeg

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Use a dovetail bit to make a narrow vertical cleat, rounded on the top end. Route a matching vertical dovetail channel in the back of your workpiece, so when the cleat is screwed to the wall, the piece slides down on it from above. 

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How much weight are you hanging? French cleat it with 1 stud 1-2 drywall anchors. This is what i did for my coat rack and it works great.

 

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Treesner and wtn’s suggestions are good.

How about recessed screws through the front and a couple plugs?

I’m guessing this is something you are wanting to make and sell to people, so you want it to be foolproof for the customer and easy/low cost for you. If that’s the case, I’d personally go with recessed screws and plugs (can buy the plugs with rounded tops, available in several species, cheap), or hardware similar to what Treesner posted. Not sure the cost of that hardware, or how much slop is in it, but it would be easy for Average Joe or Jane to install. 

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@wtnhighlander has an elegant solution that would be low cost and pretty easy for the Average Joe to install (but if the rack is very wide, installing the cleat precisely plumb would be critical, or the hook board will be visibly out of level).

The type of hardware @treesner suggested looks like it might work, but that particular design looks like it might be too wide to attach to a stud.  A similar alternative would be something like this (pretty expensive, but maybe there are cheaper versions out there):

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B06X3V98YJ/ref=psdc_9628891011_t2_B071G98PN6

@Chestnut asked an important question, and I'd also want to know how wide the hook board is.  The answers determine how much torque will be applied to the fastening system.  If the hook board is only a few inches wide, or if it's just for hanging something light weight like key chains, lots of solutions might work.  If the hook board is wider and people might be hanging heavy winter coats on it, different story - like Chestnut, I'd want it attached to the wall in two places.

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6 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

Use a dovetail bit to make a narrow vertical cleat, rounded on the top end. Route a matching vertical dovetail channel in the back of your workpiece, so when the cleat is screwed to the wall, the piece slides down on it from above. 

thats a cool idea I guess there would be a gap on the bottom but maybe not that noticeable 

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5 hours ago, Chestnut said:

How much weight are you hanging? French cleat it with 1 stud 1-2 drywall anchors. This is what i did for my coat rack and it works great.

 

well the problem is that tits really narrow not a normal 3-5 hook coat rack

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4 hours ago, JohnG said:

Treesner and wtn’s suggestions are good.

How about recessed screws through the front and a couple plugs?

I’m guessing this is something you are wanting to make and sell to people, so you want it to be foolproof for the customer and easy/low cost for you. If that’s the case, I’d personally go with recessed screws and plugs (can buy the plugs with rounded tops, available in several species, cheap), or hardware similar to what Treesner posted. Not sure the cost of that hardware, or how much slop is in it, but it would be easy for Average Joe or Jane to install. 

Yeah I want it to be fool proof and easy when I sell the pieces. wonder if theres an easy way to make own plugs? or something that covers up the screws and is removable easily 

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3 hours ago, G Ragatz said:

@wtnhighlander has an elegant solution that would be low cost and pretty easy for the Average Joe to install (but if the rack is very wide, installing the cleat precisely plumb would be critical, or the hook board will be visibly out of level).

The type of hardware @treesner suggested looks like it might work, but that particular design looks like it might be too wide to attach to a stud.  A similar alternative would be something like this (pretty expensive, but maybe there are cheaper versions out there):

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B06X3V98YJ/ref=psdc_9628891011_t2_B071G98PN6

 

Yeah I actually found the version you linked to after posting, ordered them tot test but would be ideal to find cheaper (give theres no slop and it does work) 

71Q-rv23-KL._SL1030_.jpg

 

 

 

4 hours ago, G Ragatz said:

 

@Chestnut asked an important question, and I'd also want to know how wide the hook board is.  The answers determine how much torque will be applied to the fastening system.  If the hook board is only a few inches wide, or if it's just for hanging something light weight like key chains, lots of solutions might work.  If the hook board is wider and people might be hanging heavy winter coats on it, different story - like Chestnut, I'd want it attached to the wall in two places.

I think they will be like 6-10" wide and maybe 12" tall. I'd like it to be strong enough to hold coats/backpacks 

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I've done this before by just routing two keyholes for screws directly in the workpiece. You can use paper to make a quick template for screw placement, then drill and drive them into the wall.

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