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No jig needed, other than maybe a crosscut sled.  This is one of the things that a Grripper is good for, with the narrow leg.  I'd cut flat boards a little over twice that long, plane the boards to 22mm, rip using the grripper to 7mm, and then crosscut a bunch at a time to final length.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07B29KQ9G/ref=twister_B077PD93BG?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

 

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1 minute ago, Tpt life said:

I am confused what you want? The beauty of the table saw is that the fence gets set and you rip to your hearts content. 

I need the thin cut to be between the blade and the fence. I would need to set the fence 7 mm from the blade.

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I make a down and dirty 2x4 push block I don't own a gripper, when the 2x4  push block gets too chewed up I make another takes a couple minutes to make another or make several people have been making thin strips safely on the table saw way before the gripper was even thought of.

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These three are about as good as it gets. I use the third method as often as possible as I think it to be the safest and quickest on multiple cuts. On onesies, I will use the GRipper. 

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With all due respect, I would much rather be accountable for one hand than two. To be pushing forward and down with the right stick, presents too much responsibility on keeping downward pressure on the left stick. IMO, those that that don’t like the GRipper, don’t understand it and or haven’t given it a fair chance. Again, JMO and to each his own. 

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39 minutes ago, wtnhighlander said:

I just use a simple push block, sacrificial, so it controls both pieces of stock through the blade. All wood, with a 'heel' at the back, it prevents the slim off-cuts from shooting back.

That’s normally my go to. 

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I bought that Rockler thin rip thing.  It works fine, if you don't have many to run, and all off the same piece.  The trouble with having many to do is that you have to move the fence to run the next strip off the same board, every time.  If you have multiple boards, after running several strips off of multiple boards, they don't all fit between the fence, and the jig exactly the same.

I don't think I've ever used it after the first time, for those reasons.

I have had some jobs, like hundred of glazing bars, and muntins the same width, but I just went back to using the fence, and the Grripper.  One good thing about the gripper is the rubberish stuff that holds the strip in place as it passes the blade.  I always have a helper to catch the offcuts, but I don't want him touching anything until it's well past the blade.

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The weak point of the Rockler jig is having to move the fence, and in doing so you can put more or less pressure against the roller on the jig resulting in variation in cut thickness. Excess pressure can also cause the lockdown to creep eventually for even more problems. If you can control how firm you set the fence you might be able to get more consistent cutting. Like Tom, mine found a home in the bottom of a drawer after using it a few times.

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This sounds like a job for a band saw not a table saw... loosing an 1/8" kerf means over 250 pieces your turning 3 Bf of wood into saw dust. Just my opinion.

At 7mm final thickness you can get those through a planer. I'd run these off of 1 m boards and then cut the smaller strips afterward.

Drum sander would be better but not everyone has a drum sander.

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