Recommended Posts

I am going to buy Eagle American bits , can you tell me what profile is a popular one to start with? ie ogee

Put off learning raised panel doors long enough.

Jim

I'd buy what looks good to you. There is no right or wrong here. I personally bought a roman ogee profile for my raised panels. It was on sale. One consideration is that if you want your panels to be flush with your rails and stiles, then you'll need a raised panel bit with a back cutter. Otherwise, you're panel will stand proud.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd buy what looks good to you. There is no right or wrong here. I personally bought a roman ogee profile for my raised panels. It was on sale. One consideration is that if you want your panels to be flush with your rails and stiles, then you'll need a raised panel bit with a back cutter. Otherwise, you're panel will stand proud.

Or you do like the production shops do and use 3/4 material for the stiles and rails and 5/8 material for the panels.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am going to buy Eagle American bits , can you tell me what profile is a popular one to start with? ie ogee

Put off learning raised panel doors long enough.

Jim

I really think this is a matter or taste. However, I have a couple of raised panel bits (mine just happen to be all Freud). Clients seem to all favor different styles. Not only that but often I am tasked with matching an existing cabinet or set of cabinets. Having said that, I always look for ones that have a profile which I can not perform on the table saw. In my simple little mind that gives me additional versatility. I also generally buy them with back cutters. Although often I will use 5/8 material in the panel on 3/4" doors. When I do that, obviously I don't use the back cutter, but I like to have the option.

BTW - Freud sets come with an instructional DVD and a handy poster which may help you learn to measure for raised panel doors. I'm not sure if other manufacturers have this. It can be kind of handy.

I hope this helps.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've found that unless I just have some $$$ burning a hole in my wallet, I only buy the profile that I need for the particular design I'm currently working on. However with that said, the 3/8 bead with a cove on the panel is a very traditional profile that can be used over and over.

I've used that profile on a bathroom vanity, a traditional flat panel tv stand and an American Girl wardrobe. It's pretty versatile.

Tim

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.