JayWC

Somebody is feeding me 6 ways

Recommended Posts

Originally, I was going to build a permanent out-feed table that was hooked to my table saw. After watching Marc's video, I decided to make a free standing one like he did. I changed the design in a couple of ways. It is smaller (36"x48") to fit my shop. It has an overhanging lip just in case I need to clamp something to it. It also has a removable panel in the top to access my downdraft table. The yellow metal funnel is a custom piece my dad made for me as he is a sheet metal worker. I am ordering the flip up pulls to make it easier to remove the solid panel today. I am also finishing the downdraft panel as we speak.

***EDIT*** I also forgot to mention something else. I installed adjustable leveling feet like Marc did. My plan is to be able to move the saw and table out to a more open portion of the shop to rip long boards or sheet goods if needed. I will turn the table 90 degrees for longer stock support. Just in case the floor is not the same, I can adjust the table to line up with the saw height.

Where it is in my shop, I can use the table to stage pieces going through my jointer (1), planer (2), router table (3)and drum sander (4). I can also use it as the out-feed table (5) for which it was originally intended. The last use is as a down draft table (6). In the future I plan to build a cabinet underneath for my sanders and related supplies which might count storage as number 7.

The smaller size allowed me to make it out of one sheet of plywood. Let me know your thoughts.

I am going to build a side extension for the saw next. Does anyone have suggestions for resources for a new table saw fence system? The one I have is old old old and actually broken. It works and is safe, but definitely not ideal.

post-3726-0-57918900-1298301760_thumb.jp

post-3726-0-82004200-1298301762_thumb.jp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm really falling in love with my new Incra fence, it's so nice to be able to just set it, lock it down and have the piece come out the exact width I set it for.

Even though I don't have exactly what you'd call an optimal setup(it's bolted to a Rousseau stand with a Bosch 4100 hanging on it and sitting on a shop-made cabinet), the accuracy and stability is outstanding.

post-1150-0-86727000-1298339746_thumb.jp

I did the initial setup according to the instructions, aligned the fence with the miter slot using the A-Line-It dial indicator setup and zeroed the fence by listening to it scraping the blade and giving it a couple clicks for clearance. Then I made a rip and checked it with my tape, it looked good. Made some more cuts and started wondering just how close I had gotten to the zero adjustment so I pulled out a scrap from some 5" rips and checked it with the dial caliper:

post-1150-0-06067500-1298340009_thumb.jp

I guess it doesn't get much closer.... :D

I used the fence to cut the router table ply, the laminate pieces and cabinet dividers:

post-1150-0-88187300-1298340345_thumb.jp

The fence is pricey, especially if you get the version with the WonderFence router setup, and the biggest thing I've had to get used to is moving over to the right and reaching out to adjust it instead of just reaching down to grab a lever. But it's hands-down the most accurate fence I've ever used(and I've worked with the UniFence, Bessies, Rousseaus and a number of standard portable and contractor-saw fences).

You can get the standard version from Amazon for a little over $400 or add another $200 for the WonderFence version (not including table). It's pricey but, IMO, well worth the cost. The ability to do away with squinting at rulers, bumping the fence and never quite being able to repeat a cut: PRICELESS!

Just my $.02 worth,

Bill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jay,

Nice outfeed table. It looks quite versatile. Marc inspired my outfeed table as well. I need to get off my arse and take some photos of it to post also. As far as your fence question goes, I have a Delta Unifence that I really like, but its not for everyone. Ideally you'd get a chance to go someplace and tinker with different fences to find out what you like and don't like.

In lieu of that I'd suggest thinking about what you plan to cut most often and what kind of jigs you may need down the road. Are you going to break down full sheets of plywood on your table saw, or will you break down the full sheet first and then only cut to final size on the table saw? You may even want to start an additional thread to discuss this very topic, or search the forum, one probably exists.

Good luck.

Chet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice build; lots of versatility. Only 2 problems I see with it... 1) it will be the most handy spot for things so making a cut will require clearing the deck (although this is a good thing in disguise); 2) you need some borders you can clip on so when you run the down-draft with a blower, you can have a friendly (?) game of air-hockey.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jay,

Nice outfeed table. It looks quite versatile. Marc inspired my outfeed table as well. I need to get off my arse and take some photos of it to post also. As far as your fence question goes, I have a Delta Unifence that I really like, but its not for everyone. Ideally you'd get a chance to go someplace and tinker with different fences to find out what you like and don't like.

In lieu of that I'd suggest thinking about what you plan to cut most often and what kind of jigs you may need down the road. Are you going to break down full sheets of plywood on your table saw, or will you break down the full sheet first and then only cut to final size on the table saw? You may even want to start an additional thread to discuss this very topic, or search the forum, one probably exists.

Good luck.

Chet

The unifence is good for a retro fit too? I wish there was a place locally to go test drive the fences. Seems most stores only want to have items on display that have a high turn over so they can maximize revenue more than provide a hands on selection for the customer. I will likely start a new topic with the hopes that it doesn't blow up. Actually first, I will search to see if there is one out there. Perhaps a moderator can help point me in the right direction if there is already one in the forum somewhere?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice build; lots of versatility. Only 2 problems I see with it... 1) it will be the most handy spot for things so making a cut will require clearing the deck (although this is a good thing in disguise); 2) you need some borders you can clip on so when you run the down-draft with a blower, you can have a friendly (?) game of air-hockey.

Thanks! I am hoping to have discipline in the shop that the table needs to be clean 99% of the time. If it becomes a dumping ground then I only have myself to blame and my purpose of using it for speed and safety will have been negated. It is just me working in the shop so ideally between my Sjoberg workbench and a rolling cart, this outfeed/sanding table should be clear. I recently downloaded this from the WOOD magazine and printed it for the purposes of posting it in the shop as a reminder. I hope I'm not violating copyright here...

Also, I do like your idea of turning the table into an air-hockey table, but I think I'll make one of those elsewhere...like in my house! LOL.

post-3726-0-83540300-1298389488_thumb.jp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice, I like the built in downdraft. Looks like a good assembly table too.

Only thing I see is that there's no place for a jig or the miter slide to go when you hit the end of the table.

Might not be an issue for you though...

Great job!

-Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice, I like the built in downdraft. Looks like a good assembly table too.

Only thing I see is that there's no place for a jig or the miter slide to go when you hit the end of the table.

Might not be an issue for you though...

Great job!

-Jim

I actually checked this. I found that I don't need to route a track into the table at this time. The configuration of the saw blade location and the distance of the table from the back of the saw allows the miter slide to move far enough to clear the back of the blade before bumping into the table.

I would consider using this for an assembly table, but I do not know how flat it is. I'm hoping to build a torsion box in the future for that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night I finished the down draft insert. It is actually the insert from the previous version of the downdraft hood when I supported the yellow hood on two saw horses, but I added some strips to tighten the fit in the table and also added the rubber bumpers. The wood on wood effect when sanding used to mark-up the back of whatever I was sanding. I peppered the table with these bumpers to avoid marking or denting. There is still a half a bag left if I feel I need to add more.

Next up is mortising in the flush pulls for the solid top.

post-3726-0-68856900-1298561559_thumb.jp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night I finished the down draft insert. It is actually the insert from the previous version of the downdraft hood when I supported the yellow hood on two saw horses, but I added some strips to tighten the fit in the table and also added the rubber bumpers.

That is a nice use of space. The insert looks very profesional too. Is it 3/4" birch ply?

Now you have me thinking about double dutying (is that a word?) the permantly mounted extension table I have on my saw.....I can feel a new post coming....

Tim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is a nice use of space. The insert looks very profesional too. Is it 3/4" birch ply?

Now you have me thinking about double dutying (is that a word?) the permantly mounted extension table I have on my saw.....I can feel a new post coming....

Tim

Tim, the insert is actually a junky piece of C-D plywood I had when I made the original downdraft insert that was screwed to the yellow funnel. I reused it here by adding the strips and bumpers. I might replace it in the future. Thanks for the "pro" comment too. The rest of the table and solid insert is all made out of one sheet of 3/4" birch plywood. I used normal birch too...not baltic birch to save money.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice! Are those rubber bumpers tacked on or stuck on with adhesive or what? I'm thinking about a downdraft table (different design) and that would be a nice touch...

Thanks

-Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice! Are those rubber bumpers tacked on or stuck on with adhesive or what? I'm thinking about a downdraft table (different design) and that would be a nice touch...

Thanks

-Jim

Not tacked on...so no fastener to loosen in the hole. Not stuck on...so no skidding around and leaving adhesive exposed. They are pushed in. You can look them up. They are model number 9544K22 from McMaster.com. I drilled a 1/4" hole about 5/16" deep and pushed while slightly twisting them in. I chose the ones I did because they're non-marking and decent size to avoid dimpling the wood sitting on them while applying sanding pressure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Update: I used the downdraft table last night when I was routing a round-over on some short boards with my palm router. There was virtually no saw dust on the floor! That's #7 the way I see it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I now have the WORKSHOP RULES OF ORDER posted in my shop.

Thanks for posting!

Pete

Here's a higher resolution version Pete.

post-3726-0-67481500-1299614268_thumb.jp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know it's been a while, but I have further modified my set-up.  I found having the outfeed table against the back of the saw was bad when I used a sled.  So...I moved the table away, spun it 90 degrees and built an outfeed wing.  I routed grooves in it for the sled runners and drilled holes so debris could drop to the floor.  I can now rip 10' or 12' long boards and not worry about anything falling off the back.  I've also added hooks under the table for my vacuum hoses.

post-3726-0-96308700-1416944355_thumb.jp

post-3726-0-06053200-1416944368_thumb.jp

post-3726-0-65325400-1416944483_thumb.jp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had an OLD Craftsman table saw and the fence was bad. I bought the Incra fence system and put on it.  Incra made the old saw look like a rock star.  i love it.  No more measuring and bumping.  Watch the Youtube videos. The guy with the chin beard is named Mark and he makes it look easy but it really is. It is dead on accurate-----every time.  It's pricey but every time you walk in your shop, you'll look at it and grin.  You won't EVER regret the purchase.  Then when I bought my Grizzly cabinet saw, I never installed the factory fence.  I transferred the Incra to it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice project, I seem to have a hard time making upgrades, do to other stuff taking priority. it seems I spend a lot of time cleaning up I guess its about time to look at some dust collection and air filtration. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.