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cyrille

need help organizing new woodshop

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hello,

I am working on building a workshop, it will have a 5.6*4.6m (17*14ft) inside dimensions...

My "problem" is trying trying to place the various items in the shop (which I need to do ahead of time as I want to bury power and dust collection pipes)...

Since I am at the design phase, I can do prety much what I want, which is nice! however, I have a hard time thinking how to organize the various items...

Hence asking for help here!!!!

I need to place the following items (by order of most to least used):

Rigid table saw: 160*100cm
tool box: 50*70cm
planer: 70*100
6" jointer (110*60cm)
band saw: 60*50cm
lathe: 160*50cm

I also have a bench (70*180cm), BUT I am willing to change/recreate it as needed. for example to transform it into a combination bench/outfeed table for the bandsaw...

I woudl also like to find a way to use the 'door' to cut and plane longer boards... But I have not found a good solution without using a large garage door...

I have a slew of smaller bench tools, but these will most likely sit on woodshop long benches/cabinets on the wall sides. Simillary, the jointer (which I seldom use) is planned to be on the side and brought forward when needed)

I plan to do a lot of wood storage on the outside, I will also place the dust collection outside.

Any advices? proposal?

Thanks,

Cyrille

Sans titre.jpg

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Work flow involves a lot of personal preference. I am facing a similar situation, but with different tools. Your layout looks reasonable to me.

I might consider rotating the workbench 90 degrees and moving the item marked 'rabot' next to it to allow more walkway between the saw and jointer.

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The jointer needs to be moved. It should be near the table saw. Like the table saw, you will need room for infeed and outfeed. I would want to add a thickness planer. I would put wheels on as many tools as possible. With a small wok area, permanent wheels will let you reconfigure your shop as each project has different demands. My shop is bigger than yours, but still small. I have 5 or 6 tools on wheels and like it.

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hello,

 

sorry, "rabot" is the planer (french word)...

I do not used the jointer a lot, which is why I have it on the side, however, I do use the planer a LOT! U guess my boards are usually straight enough that I do not need to use the Jointer much...

anyhow, it is my perception that, on the jointer, you can not put boards longer than twice the jointer length (give or take), so this means that I do not need that much in/outfeed space... is this not a correct reasoning?

Cyrille

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As advised above flow and placement really depends on you and the type of projects you like to do. Having said that I have moved enough dust collection drops in the last 15 years to know its not something I would bury unless I was really sure on placement. Power isn't so bad because you can make longer extension cords if needed.

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From personal experience the lathe will need space around it to clean up the shavings, even with just spindle turning it gets messy fast. A dust collector is generally useful only during the sanding as the chips fly faster and farther than a collection nozzle can catch.

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Many recommend, if possible, to have all of the machines that require dust collection to be somewhat grouped together, or at least along the same wall. That will allow for a single and more efficient system. It's also possible to put multiple spare dust collection outlets along the wall (either closed off or using gates) to allow for expansion or movement of tools, simply attaching a flexible hose to the new requirement. All that said, I would move the planned chop saw over to the right wall in place of the bench/cabinets and have the bandsaw on wheels to be able to roll over when needed.

Depending on the type of projects that you make, you might consider having a small outfeed table on the saw and moving your bench closer to the back wall. Using the bench as an outfeed is great in theory, but I usually have too many things on it to be practical. It's always good to have an extra assembly area anyway.

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When you figure a shop layout it should be based on good flow from start to finish. If you criss cross too much or moving to get access to tooling you have failed on flow...

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Don't make things too "permanent".  I have rearranged the shop 4-5 times when I have added machines or trying to get a better work flow.

I used to have the jointer in the corner because I only used it for a relatively short amount of time on each project.  It was inconvenient and I found myself delaying or finding something else to do because i didn't feel like dragging it out for 5 minutes of work.  Personally I find it more satisfying when all of the major equipment is out and ready to use - and projects get done faster because I'm not kicking sawdust around the floor watching YouTube videos because I need to drag out the jointer.

If you are using your bench as an outfeed table and the counters around the jointer allow you to use it without pulling it out - you have a good start.  I also like to keep my sanders and hand tools closer to the bench and use the cabinets near the corners for miscellaneous storage.

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On 9/19/2019 at 7:44 AM, Dave said:

Don't make things too "permanent"

+1!  There really is no such thing as a permanent shop arrangement.  Most everyone who are suggesting a particular arrangement are doing so because they started out with an arrangement they didn't like and have since changed.  Folks may not move homes so frequently in France, but it's also true that a lot of forum members are not in their first shop or their last.

If you can agree with that philosophy and make flexible DC and electrical installations, then you don't have so much at stake to get your shop design just right, now.

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I understand completely your desire to put the collection and electric in the floor.  As stated, without a good understanding of your work flow, it's difficult to "predict" what you need.

 

What I would do in your case, considering the size of the shop, is I would run a "U" pattern near the walls, with "up links" to where you think the tools will go.  Add a couple of extra, but "cap" them.  Add two runs to the center for the planer and table saw.  Perhaps a third for a "floor sweep".

 

Then, if you find you want to change layout to improve flow, there will probably be a nearby gate to run a hose from the machine to the floor.

 

I may not do that with a larger shop, but at this size, I don't see you as being too far off.

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DC piping under the floor? What if you get a clogged pipe? Electrical- make sure that sawdust, etc., stays out of the outlets.
Even with covers, that might be iffy.

Hope I'm reading this thread correctly.

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Two things have been mentioned: Taste and versatility. The third is project type. What you build will tend to drive the versatility of your shop.

If I were in your shoes I'd do something like this: The material gets is rough milling, its finish milling, then to the bench(es) for fine-tuning and assembly.  But that may not suit the work you do.

If it's on wheels then it can serve your needs. Just roll it out of the way when you're finished or don't need it for a given project. If the equipment is fixed then you're stuck when work changes.

ShopWorkflow.jpg

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22 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

Watch the first few videos in this playlist for some ideas about in-floor utilities:

 

This old boy has got his act together. And he certainly picked the right bride to accompany him to the alter. Thanks for sharing. 

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