Chestnut

Dining Chairs

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2 minutes ago, Bmac said:

For the curved backrest, and I know you don't plan on doing it but I had some thoughts I'd share anyway. The lamination makes the joinery much more difficult, not impossible but definitely more difficult. Cutting a curved backrest out of a solid piece with the joinery already done before cutting out the shape is a much easier approach. With that said, I think with some more fiddling with your jig you would have eventually gotten the joint right with the laminated piece. 

Yes except I'd need to waste a butt load of 10/4 cherry which i don't have and don't want to waste just to get a 1/2" thick back. My counter argument is the time saved in figuring out the joinery would be spend cleaning up band saw  marks and shaping the back rest. A 9" wide curved resaw would be very challenging in a different way. My design that I'm standing firm on is what is causing the troubles. If i yield on the design it ruins the idea I've had for the last 6 years.

Now that i know the drastic curve isn't really necessary I might still do some curve but just contain it within a 6/4 board which is what i was going to use anyway... we shall see. A very gentle curve that I'm picturing could be sent through the drum sander to make fast work of cleanup, well at least one side.

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12 minutes ago, Chestnut said:

Yes except I'd need to waste a butt load of 10/4 cherry which i don't have and don't want to waste just to get a 1/2" thick back. My counter argument is the time saved in figuring out the joinery would be spend cleaning up band saw  marks and shaping the back rest. A 9" wide curved resaw would be very challenging in a different way. My design that I'm standing firm on is what is causing the troubles. If i yield on the design it ruins the idea I've had for the last 6 years.

Now that i know the drastic curve isn't really necessary I might still do some curve but just contain it within a 6/4 board which is what i was going to use anyway... we shall see. A very gentle curve that I'm picturing could be sent through the drum sander to make fast work of cleanup, well at least one side.

You nailed it, you waste a ton of wood doing it my way. It is something I struggle with all the time but is less of an issue for me because I mill my own wood and it's not too much of a premium for me cost wise. But I understand your concern completely.

Lessening the curve will help, I guess from your post I thought you were going to scrap the curve. Cleaning up bandsaw marks always are a chore on these sculptured pieces I do, and esp if you are doing an area that is 9" wide. 

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4 hours ago, treeslayer said:

Great work Drew but I’m not gonna lie it’s making my head spin, one would be over my pay grade but more than that many would cause me to drink. IMO chairs are tough to build but you are nailing it !

It's making my head spin as well, trouble is I have to make it through these chairs or else the constant jabs from the folks on here would drive me crazy :D. I have been spending the better part of the last 3 months trying to figure it out. I've been doing so as I work on other projects but the difficulties with these chairs have been at the front of my mind.

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Making one offs is tough to begin with but making four or more that have to match is gonna be a chore. No pressure! 

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13 hours ago, Chestnut said:

or else the constant jabs from the folks on here would drive me crazy :D.

Who?  Me?  :rolleyes:

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On 1/6/2020 at 4:36 PM, Bmac said:

You nailed it, you waste a ton of wood doing it my way. It is something I struggle with all the time but is less of an issue for me because I mill my own wood and it's not too much of a premium for me cost wise. But I understand your concern completely.

Lessening the curve will help, I guess from your post I thought you were going to scrap the curve. Cleaning up bandsaw marks always are a chore on these sculptured pieces I do, and esp if you are doing an area that is 9" wide. 

I've been eating dinner in the strait back prototype the last few days and while the heavy curve is more comfortable It's not really noticeably so. The difference isn't really enough to warrant the extra effort. It'd be fun to maybe do 1 or 2 of them but trying to sell that to Megan would be difficult. Everything has to be the same for her and having 2 drastically different chairs our of 6 would bother her.

If i wanted to cut out the curve instead of laminate I'd need to get 12/4 cherry (10/4 would be enough but no one carries that around here, I've looked) and I'd have to order at least $500 worth. The cost isn't the big thing really it's the availability and the waste. Even If I milled my own I'd still look for ways to efficiently use the wood.

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3 hours ago, Chestnut said:

Everything has to be the same for her and having 2 drastically different chairs our of 6 would bother her.

What if you made two different for the "head of the table" and the opposite end.  Maybe even add arm rests or some other feature to make them stand out a little.  This is pretty common when you look at dining sets.

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On 1/8/2020 at 12:21 PM, Chet said:

What if you made two different for the "head of the table" and the opposite end.  Maybe even add arm rests or some other feature to make them stand out a little.  This is pretty common when you look at dining sets.

I had thought about that. The trouble is, those are the types of things that Megan doesn't like. She would want all chairs to bet the same.

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Looking great Drew, attention to detail when making multiple pieces is critical and you’re nailing it sir, those are going to be awesome, I may not be so frightened of making chairs after your journal is done, very good work all around 

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Nice work, Drew! In the syraight-on shots of the partially assembked frame, the back legs appear to bow out to the sides where the seat frame joins them. Is that really part of the shape, or just an artifact of the camera angle?

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Looking great Nut! If you were to glue up the legs in the first pic, there would be no glue line! The “sweep” in the backs are, as others have pointed out, is a compliment in your detail to your work. Nice job bud. I bet Megan is impressed! 

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8 hours ago, treeslayer said:

Looking great Drew, attention to detail when making multiple pieces is critical and you’re nailing it sir, those are going to be awesome, I may not be so frightened of making chairs after your journal is done, very good work all around 

Getting the prototype done was the harder part now it's just batching. I'm approaching this like I'm making 6 small tables. Tables are my favorite.

 

8 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

Nice work, Drew! In the syraight-on shots of the partially assembked frame, the back legs appear to bow out to the sides where the seat frame joins them. Is that really part of the shape, or just an artifact of the camera angle?

The back rest angles away from the camera so it's just a trick of perspective. The backs legs are parallel.

 

7 hours ago, Coop said:

I bet Megan is impressed! 

She is just sick of folding chairs... I think she's mentioned buying chairs once or twice but always changes her mind when she sees the cost for a solid cherry dining chair.:lol:

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Really like the detail in that backrest, very cool. What you are making would be so expensive to buy. Most mass produced chairs are lacking very much in quality. Not many pieces of furniture get worked as hard as a chair. It's one thing to buy a mass produced cabinet, no one sits on it or drags it across the floor. Mass produced chairs cannot hold up to what people put them through.

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14 hours ago, Mark J said:

Smart economics, now she'll have saved enough money to get that dog.  :D

What kind of dog? Did I miss it? 

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10 hours ago, Bmac said:

Really like the detail in that backrest, very cool. What you are making would be so expensive to buy. Most mass produced chairs are lacking very much in quality. Not many pieces of furniture get worked as hard as a chair. It's one thing to buy a mass produced cabinet, no one sits on it or drags it across the floor. Mass produced chairs cannot hold up to what people put them through.

Nothing really. The chairs that initially gave me the design idea are $350 each in cherry. It's not a massive sum but it's expensive compared to the $450 the lumber will cost me.

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1 hour ago, Chestnut said:

Nothing really. The chairs that initially gave me the design idea are $350 each in cherry. It's not a massive sum but it's expensive compared to the $450 the lumber will cost me.

Well my point is a lot of chairs you buy today are not going to have the joinery you plan to use. Most mass produced chairs are just held together with dowels.

Regardless of their construction, 6 x $325 is $2000, minus your $450 investment saves a decent sum. I know it's not massive but sounds like you have an argument to add a new tool to the shop, or at least buy some more lumber!

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5 hours ago, Bmac said:

but sounds like you have an argument to add a new tool to the shop,

Couldn't have said it better.

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A like you attention to detail and the care your are taking at each step.   I like it.

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