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Even though it was overkill, I'm curious if you used waxed or dewaxed shellac?  Just thinking that waxed might be less prone to adhere to the errant drop of glue, etc.  

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46 minutes ago, Mark J said:

Even though it was overkill, I'm curious if you used waxed or dewaxed shellac?  Just thinking that waxed might be less prone to adhere to the errant drop of glue, etc.  

Well the plates are inside a mortise tucked back there a ways so if i get glue on them I'm doing something really wrong. I used dewaxed thought as that's all i have in my shop. I've found that finish wise it's as good as the waxed stuff and has more utility as i can top coat it with other finishes.

  • Haha 1

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Nice, you’ll enjoy it! I’ve got the old original Comet and I’ve been working up toward convincing myself to get the II. The speed control and reversible feature look nice. I haven’t really had any need for a bigger lathe, but I wouldn’t turn down the couple extra inches in diameter and between centers. 

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Hum well it took me 3 hours to make 1 knob.... this might take a while.

1101192049.thumb.jpg.1222e194b75f822cb0785857ae1d20cd.jpg

There is no way these 3 knobs are going to be any where close to similar.

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Once you get the first one under your belt, the rest will go faster..  Set yourself up some calipers for the different diameters..  

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1 hour ago, Chestnut said:

Identical copy and don't you dare tell me different.

It's like looking at them in a mirror.

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There is no reason the knobs should be the same.  Make them anyway you want!

It looks like a very good surface finish.  Did you use the carbide scrapers? 

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That was one expensive oil change LOL. $100 plus a knob only a ww could justify that, nice job!!

Bench is looking great Drew!!

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I'm sure that would be a fun lathe to have! 

Now that you have some practice,  look for some Amboyna burl.   And maybe get those metal wheels smoothed, and Cerakoted.

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8 hours ago, Mark J said:

t looks like a very good surface finish.  Did you use the carbide scrapers? 

I sanded quite a bit then used the saw dust trick i keep hearing turners talk about. I can't believe how abrasive sawdust is.

Yes i used carbide tools, not sure if it's a scraper, it's the round one. The diamond shaped parting tool really isn't the best for parting, so i was going the sharpen up and use the HSS parting tool. How exactly does one avoid catches?

16 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

And we joke about the women buying stuff just because its on sale!!! 

Hey now!

7 hours ago, Tom King said:

And maybe get those metal wheels smoothed, and Cerakoted.

That looks like an awesome finish. Though i probably won't have the wheels smoothed as i could have bought them like that. I heated the wheel up with a torch and applied some boiled linseed oil, hopefully that's enough to stop major rusting.

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1 hour ago, Chestnut said:

How exactly does one avoid catches?

By not turning the lathe on :lol::lol:

OK, there's some truth to that.  Everyone gets carches, although with experience it's less often.

I'm betting the carbide tools you have are scrapers.  The top surface will be flat.  A carbide shear cutter will have a sharp up turned rim, like a pie pan shape.

Typically you get a round cutter for general shaping, a radiused square for roughing and some shaping and a diamond tool which is for detail work, not parting.  Just get an ordinary parting tool for now.  

Here's some quick advice on using these types of lathe tools. 

Keep the tool rest fairly close and positioned so the tool shaft crosses at 75* to 90*.  The tool is positioned flat level--no roll, no pitch.  The tool tip should be at the center of rotation--zero altitude. 

Now keep a light touch.  If you're roughing a square to round you can ge more aggressive, but it doesn't pay when you're trying to make a contour. 

Don't overdo it, but you don't want the lathe speed too slow.  For a knob try 1000 rpm and then see if you want to go up or down from there.

And I would make those knobs three different shapes out of three different woods.  This is your time to take a stand on knob conformity!

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21 hours ago, Chestnut said:

Nailed it!

DSC_3786-01.thumb.jpeg.072e38909e6f6c6a318f717223c94e77.jpeg

Identical copy and don't you dare tell me different.

 

..... :D :P

I’m thinking boob jobs by two different docs but hey, never seen too many that I didn’t like. Looks great Nut! 

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1 hour ago, Mark J said:

By not turning the lathe on :lol::lol:

OK, there's some truth to that.  Everyone gets carches, although with experience it's less often.

I'm betting the carbide tools you have are scrapers.  The top surface will be flat.  A carbide shear cutter will have a sharp up turned rim, like a pie pan shape.

Typically you get a round cutter for general shaping, a radiused square for roughing and some shaping and a diamond tool which is for detail work, not parting.  Just get an ordinary parting tool for now.  

Here's some quick advice on using these types of lathe tools. 

Keep the tool rest fairly close and positioned so the tool shaft crosses at 75* to 90*.  The tool is positioned flat level--no roll, no pitch.  The tool tip should be at the center of rotation--zero altitude. 

Now keep a light touch.  If you're roughing a square to round you can ge more aggressive, but it doesn't pay when you're trying to make a contour. 

Don't overdo it, but you don't want the lathe speed too slow.  For a knob try 1000 rpm and then see if you want to go up or down from there.

And I would make those knobs three different shapes out of three different woods.  This is your time to take a stand on knob conformity!

I never knew how it was supposed to be done.  I just pick up one of the tools, and put it to wood to see what it'll do.  I didn't take shop in High School.

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16 minutes ago, Chestnut said:

Purpleheart, Red Oak. and Pine, they also happen to be some of the most divisive woods.

Ain't that the truth. You're becoming a bit of a subversive :ph34r:

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I thought that the figure was going to pop on that chop, it looked interesting even before you applied the finish.

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