Table saw fence distance


Rocko
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Gotcha. I need to double check square blade and fence to miter tracks. Maybe that will solve my quandary. But what I mean is measuring from fence to blade let's say 7" is what tape reads on t-fence, however, when I measure with a tape measure the measurement reads 7 1/16-1/8. 

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On a lot of the fences the cursor with the hairline is adjustable, usually a couple of screws to loosen and then slide the lense to one side or the other until the hairline is over the number.   If yours is adjustable, all you need to do is set your fence to a distance from the inside or fence side of the blade, say 10 inches then lock the fence.  Once you have done this, adjust the hairline on you saw until it is over the 10 inch mark on the guide rail of the fence.  This should give you a real close match to you tape measure.  If you change the tape measure you use then you have to re-check this setting, each tape measure can and probably will read a little different from the other.  Even the same brand can be slightly different.

 

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1 minute ago, Chet said:

On a lot of the fences the cursor with the hairline is adjustable, usually a couple of screws to loosen and then slide the lense to one side or the other until the hairline is over the number.   If yours is adjustable, all you need to do is set your fence to a distance from the inside or fence side of the blade, say 10 inches then lock the fence.  Once you have done this, adjust the hairline on you saw until it is over the 10 inch mark on the guide rail of the fence.  This should give you a real close match to you tape measure.  If you change the tape measure you use then you have to re-check this setting, each tape measure can and probably will read a little different from the other.  Even the same brand can be slightly different.

 

Ok thank you. I figured there was a slight adjustment somewhere. I'll check the fence. This saw is a huge upgrade to prior saw. The t-fence is incredible. 

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Having read Chet’s reply, I think one more thing needs to be said. If you dial that hairline in, this is a task that will need to be repeated at every blade change. Each blade’s tooth geometry and runout will vary a bit. This is why for most runs, I will mark a board, start a test cut, then measure or fit the test cut. That’s just a preference of workflow. Don’t follow it like Gospel. 

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4 minutes ago, Tpt life said:

Having read Chet’s reply, I think one more thing needs to be said. If you dial that hairline in, this is a task that will need to be repeated at every blade change. Each blade’s tooth geometry and runout will vary a bit. This is why for most runs, I will mark a board, start a test cut, then measure or fit the test cut. That’s just a preference of workflow. Don’t follow it like Gospel. 

Cool thanks. Yeah figured with new blades I would need to check measurement again. This applies to single blade operations right? Not dado?

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I find it better to keep a long-ish steel rule at the saw, and use it rather than a tape for setting the fence. No variation, always the same rule.

And of course, transfering dimensions from the work directly is always tighter than reading a rule.

Please, make a habit of unplugging the machine for any operation that requires touching the blade, or sticking a steel rule into it. Switches , especially the non-magnetic kind, sometimes fail or get actuated by accident. Murphy's law dictates your fingers are likely to be in the blade whenever that happens.

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9 hours ago, Tpt life said:

That is to be expected. Those tapes on the fence rails are a guide only and not appropriate for fine work. 

I don't agree with that. My last 2 fences were dead on. That said, with a left tilt saw, the cursor will only be accurate when using the same width blade that it was calibrated on.

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9 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

Please, make a habit of unplugging the machine for any operation that requires touching the blade, or sticking a steel rule into it. Switches , especially the non-magnetic kind, sometimes fail or get actuated by accident. Murphy's law dictates your fingers are likely to be in the blade whenever that happens.

I can't agree with that strenuously enough.

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7 hours ago, drzaius said:

I don't agree with that. My last 2 fences were dead on. That said, with a left tilt saw, the cursor will only be accurate when using the same width blade that it was calibrated on.

I guess maybe it depends on your work flow? The height of the blade above the table on a 10” saw has an impact on deflection. The amount of blade buried in wood affects the blade as heat builds a bit. Maybe if all you cut is 3/4” or less, you will never see issues. However, I routinely see 1/64” of variance that can be accounted for with a simple test cut. Just curious thoughts. 

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On 10/18/2019 at 2:26 PM, Tpt life said:

That is to be expected. Those tapes on the fence rails are a guide only and not appropriate for fine work. 

I have to disagree with this statement, although the answer may vary with context. I bought a Beisemeyer fence years ago and spent a couple hours installing and adjusting it. I set the cursor hairline so it accurately shows the correct setting.

Now, I don't bother using a tape to check measurements. I set it by the cursor and go. It is accurate to less than a 1/64th, more than enough for normal woodworking. It was a game changer for me and really sped up my work.

Having said that, you have to be sure that the supplied stick-on tape measure is accurate. Some of them are not and you will get weird results from them.

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On 10/20/2019 at 5:42 PM, Rocko said:

Update: fence was in towards blade maybe a 1/16 on tail end. Squared it to miter front and back. Blade appears square to miter track also. Used combunation to check both. I haven't checked to cursor window yet but will do so. 

Making a step up on a tool is always inspiring.  Sounds like your new saw puts a smile on your face.  I started with a used contractor saw and went through the steps that a lot of folks do.  I can say that even at the humble beginning, taking the time to setup my machines to their best potential paid big dividends and extended their useful life.  There is some discussion here about aligning your saw on two planes.  Aligning at 90 degrees and setting up your rip scale is great.  Addressing alignment at other angles becomes important as soon as you want a bevel cut to match up to something else . . . or not burn or bind.

There are a lot of great folks on here who will go the distance to help others.  Lots of good historical threads on a lot of topics as well.  It looks like you have a good start on your journey and woodworking forums are a good resource to use along the way.  I am particularly enjoying your progress as I am trapped between shops right now for the first time in many years. 

From here:

1153054673_ST-2018(11).jpg.eff4e3ce3acc8c89f081ef360bf0f960.jpg

to here:

McLaren-Shop-20190718.thumb.jpg.cf304bf7d359efd4fd10225062bfee72.jpg

I'm currently living vicariously through others :D:D:D

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6 hours ago, gee-dub said:

Making a step up on a tool is always inspiring.  Sounds like your new saw puts a smile on your face.  I started with a used contractor saw and went through the steps that a lot of folks do.  I can say that even at the humble beginning, taking the time to setup my machines to their best potential paid big dividends and extended their useful life.  There is some discussion here about aligning your saw on two planes.  Aligning at 90 degrees and setting up your rip scale is great.  Addressing alignment at other angles becomes important as soon as you want a bevel cut to match up to something else . . . or not burn or bind.

There are a lot of great folks on here who will go the distance to help others.  Lots of good historical threads on a lot of topics as well.  It looks like you have a good start on your journey and woodworking forums are a good resource to use along the way.  I am particularly enjoying your progress as I am trapped between shops right now for the first time in many years. 

From here:

1153054673_ST-2018(11).jpg.eff4e3ce3acc8c89f081ef360bf0f960.jpg

to here:

McLaren-Shop-20190718.thumb.jpg.cf304bf7d359efd4fd10225062bfee72.jpg

I'm currently living vicariously through others :D:D:D

Oh my yeah that's tight fit 

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