bertmoog

Matching teak veneer with solid

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I've tried searching for advice on how to match veneer with solid wood (when finishing) and most of the time (maple, cherry, walnut, etc.) the veneer and the solid that they start with look almost identical.  In my case, the veneer and solid look nothing alike.  I ordered quarter sawn teak veneer online and when I received it, the color looks nothing like the beautiful, solid teak I had. 

The image is after applying one coat of teak oil to each. As you can see, the solid is an orangey, golden brown, with a nice range of detail and color just like I have always seen teak.  The veneer is a strange tan looking color with little variation.

I sat the veneer outside in the sun for a day and then compared it with a control piece.  Almost no change at all, maybe a shade darker.  I'm sure the veneer was cut from plantation teak, but I really didn't expect the stark difference.  Was hoping to do a wipe-on oil finish with no staining because I love the look of teak, but it seems I won't be able to get away with that.

I was told that this was the best place to come for intelligent and experienced advice, I would very appreciate any ideas on how to proceed with trying to match these color-wise.  Thank you so much.

teak.jpg

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Such is one of the challenges when using veneer. I suggest spraying very dilute dye in successive coats until things match up. On scraps of course.

I've had success with tinting shellac & brushing it on to match colors also.

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I suspect that the difference has to do with grain than anything else. The quarter sawn on the right looks nothing like the sample on the left  because it is not quarter sawn but, either flat (plain) sawn or rift cut. It is not unusual for wood of the same species from different different trees to look different. Even so, there is a very distinct difference between quarter sawn and flat sawn.  Get some flat or plane sawn veneer and they will look more similar.

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Since you alrady have oil on both pieces you are somewhat limited in fixing yout color problem.  A pentrating stain will probably not work since the oil has dealed the wood.  I think that using transtint dye in shellac, as Drzaius suggested might work.  You will need a scrap piece of the veneer to use as a test piece.  You can make a light color darker but not the opposite.  It appears that the veneer is a cooler (greener color) so I would start with a bownish red warmer color) dye.   Use just a little at a time and sneak up on your color.  Be sure to measure the amount of shellac and count the number of drop of dye that you add so you can duplicate it once you find the right recipe.  You may need red and black, too.  This is an art, not a science.  Start with a clear coat of dewaxed shellac first after the tung oil has completely dried.  Good luck.

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13 hours ago, Ronn W said:

Since you alrady have oil on both pieces

I'm sorry, I should've been more clear.  These are just scraps for testing the oil on.  Building two speaker cabinets that have the [raw] veneer on the sides and will have solid wood top and bottom caps and solid legs.  Yes the veneer is a greener color especially when raw.  I really thought the sun would even it out.  Thanks so much for the advice.  I guess artificial color is the only way.

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Information on teak color change.

https://www.mcilvain.com/teak-decking-color-changes/

Another thing to keep in mind is that all wood is a natural product and is going to have color variation from one board to another. Even in the same tree wood will exhibit color variation. The odds are higher that the veneer is from an old growth Forrest and the boards are from the plantation stock. Though plantation lumber is a good thing as it's given optimal conditions to grow under and the forests undergo proper maintenance to allow for better lumber with fewer defects.

If you wan your color to match perfectly veneer the other parts of your work with the same veneer that you are using for the cabinet. You can mess around with dyes but they will adjust and alter how the wood changes color with time and will probably make the 10 year result uneven. The other option is to accept that wood is a natural product and contains various colors and appreciate it's natural beauty. If you want a man made manufactured look a natural product may not be the best choice.

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On 10/24/2019 at 12:16 PM, bertmoog said:

'm sorry, I should've been more clear.  These are just scraps for testing the oil on.  Building two speaker cabinets that have the [raw] veneer on the sides and will have solid wood top and bottom caps and solid legs.  Yes the veneer is a greener color especially when raw.  I really thought the sun would even it out.  Thanks so much for the advice.  I guess artificial color is the only way.

No oil yet.  This means that you could use stain to color the light piece.  I am not sure if you can then apply the oil after the stain is dry.

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On 10/25/2019 at 1:36 PM, Ronn W said:

I am not sure if you can then apply the oil after the stain is dry.

Right.  This is what I'm trying to figure out currently (can't test now, at work).  Since teak is oily to begin with, and this is a thin piece of veneer, much of the stain may remain on the surface even after wiping.  The soilds might re-dissolve and get displaced with the oil coat.

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