Rocko

New stain

Recommended Posts

So what are you planning to do with them?  Let us know what you think of the water based vs oil based.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Ronn W said:

So what are you planning to do with them?  Let us know what you think of the water based vs oil based.

This

20191101_181056.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just want to forewarn you not to expect good results with staining construction grade lumber. The results will be blotchy and the summer growth will slurp up the stain while the winter growth will not. I don't even think dye would yield a good result. Paint would be best, or just a clear coat of some kind.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's for my bride fellas. Thjs what she asked for. But while we're on the topic of applying stain... Maybe i don't quite understand stain like I thought. What is stains purpose? Or grade of lumber? Slabs? Etc...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stain is simply for making wood a different color than it naturally is. Similar to painting it, except that it is not opaque. Some wood species tend to be "blotchy" and not take stain evenly, pine and maple are good examples of that.

Some people like staining wood, some do not (most here do not). The people who don't like stain think that if you want a darker color, then you should use a species of wood that has the color you want. However, if your spouse wants a certain look, but don't have the budget for the hardwoods that would give that appearance, stains are a good option.

Stain is also great for repairing antique furniture. If you have to replace part of a piece of furniture, you can use stains, dyes, glazes, and toners to make the new wood look similar to the aged wood, making the repair less noticeable.

I've recommended these videos to people many times, they have really good information about how stains work and how to get the desired appearance with them.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, JohnG said:

Stain is simply for making wood a different color than it naturally is. Similar to painting it, except that it is not opaque. Some wood species tend to be "blotchy" and not take stain evenly, pine and maple are good examples of that.

Some people like staining wood, some do not (most here do not). The people who don't like stain think that if you want a darker color, then you should use a species of wood that has the color you want. However, if your spouse wants a certain look, but don't have the budget for the hardwoods that would give that appearance, stains are a good option.

Stain is also great for repairing antique furniture. If you have to replace part of a piece of furniture, you can use stains, dyes, glazes, and toners to make the new wood look similar to the aged wood, making the repair less noticeable.

I've recommended these videos to people many times, they have really good information about how stains work and how to get the desired appearance with them.

 

Thanks John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can also use dyes like "Trans tint". The tend to color the wood more evenly than stain. That is to say that there will be less differene between the the different grains.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Rocko, after looking at your table again, and considering the colors you experimented with, I would do this, were I in your shoes: Use the 'Tobacco' stain on the framework of the base. Maybe 2 coats, get it really dark. Then apply natural color Danish Oil to the top and to the lower shelf. Plane, scrape, and/or sand the top and shelf to 220 grit first, then use 400 grit wet or dry paper to work in the Danish oil while it is wet (apply it heavily). Follow after 15 - 20 minutes with a clean cotton rag and wipe away the excess. Repeat every 8 hours or so to get a buttery smooth, wheat straw gold finish. Then coat the whole thing with 2 or 3 coats of satin polyurathane for durability

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

@Rocko, after looking at your table again, and considering the colors you experimented with, I would do this, were I in your shoes: Use the 'Tobacco' stain on the framework of the base. Maybe 2 coats, get it really dark. Then apply natural color Danish Oil to the top and to the lower shelf. Plane, scrape, and/or sand the top and shelf to 220 grit first, then use 400 grit wet or dry paper to work in the Danish oil while it is wet (apply it heavily). Follow after 15 - 20 minutes with a clean cotton rag and wipe away the excess. Repeat every 8 hours or so to get a buttery smooth, wheat straw gold finish. Then coat the whole thing with 2 or 3 coats of satin polyurathane for durability

 

May try this on future projects. However, I started finishing yesterday. End result coming soon! 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.