TedT-CA

Sealing over "Biosheild Hard Oil #9" (linseed+tung oils)

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I had a cabinet maker build be a TV lift cabinet for my bedroom from walnut plywood and hardwood sections (corners).  He finished with "Bioshield Hard Oil #9" which appears to be linseed and tung oils with some chemicals to help dry I guess.

The cabinet sat at the cabinet maker's for 2 weeks.  When we put it into our room, we could not even stay in the bedroom the odor was so strong.  The cabinet maker took it back and stored it for another 3 weeks.  Upon it's return, still smelled.  It has been in my garage for another 3 weeks and doesn't seem to be getting much better.  The finish seems correct as it does not have any tackiness.  He said it was 3 coats per the manufacturers recommendation and he uses it all the time on his work.

So I am wondering if it can be sealed with a polyurethane or other finish that will kill the oil smell and not react with the original oils.  If so, what shoulb be used and any special techniques?

Thanks

Ted T

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If the oil still smells, it isn't fully cured. A topcoat may not adhere. You can try asking the guy to wipe it down with the solvent appropriate to that finish, see if it removes any excess and allows it to cure out faster.

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Since the piece  is sitting in your garage, you might consider aiming a fan at it, possibly with a door or window open. 

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It has been in my garage with a fan to circulate on the inside - it is a large 5 sided cabinet.  It has been cooler here so might add a heater.

I am investigating the shellac idea and a new finish over it. I have had suggested Zinsser's Bin Shellac and when dry, apply 3 coats of AFM Acrylacq to block the emissions. 

As far as wiping the current finish with a solvent, haven't gotten that far.  The finish is smooth and not sticky but I guess a solvent would pull some of the finish out.

Thanks for the suggestions.

Ted T

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The idea of wiping the piece with solvent to "pull some of the finish out" is not going to help, IMO.  What I believe has caused the upset to your nose is, in fact, not the finish, but rather the solvent in which the finish was dissolved in order to facilitate application. 

Have you checked lately to see if the piece still smells bad to you?  Have you or the builder checked with the manufacturer of the finish for any helpful suggestions?  Regarding the application of shellac: while shellac is a good sealer [with its own solvent],  how would retarding the evaporation of the initial solvent serve any good purpose?

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