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Valleyslim

Do i need FLG blade?

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Im trying to make the wood whisperer's cutting board, and im just using a 24 tooth blade from diablo, and my cuts into the hardwood makes it look like there is a bump in the middle so when I try to glue up the cuts together there is a gap on top and bottom and only the middle is touching, I've made many adjustments to the saw as much as I could but I still have that middle sticking out. my plan was thinking a planer would fix this but if both sides have that bump i don't think that will work because i need at least 1 side flat. So is it my blade? my tooth angles seem to lean left and right every other tooth is that makes a difference. Thanks in advance

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First off, never run end grain through a planer!  That's inviting trouble you don't want.

Can you joint the individual pieces to get them flat?

I run a 40T blade most of the time and don't have this issue.

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I'm not sure I fully understand what you're describing but it sounds like something is out of alignment on your saw, or the stock you are using is not straight to begin with. Can you post a couple pictures of the issue or go into more detail about what steps you have taken so far?

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I agree a pic would help.  If this is a rip cut, how are you creating the flat edge to run along the fence.  If you are not creating a flat reference edge, your trouble starts here.  Compound that by all the cuts and parts in an end grain cutting board and you have problems.  If this is a different cut at a different step, I guess I need a picture ;-)

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Any chance you are cutting from one face, then flipping the board to cut through from the opposite face? I can't understand how the circular blade can make a bulge in the middle of the edge if you are cutting through in one pass.

If taking multiple passes, having the blade off square to the table might cause this.

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5 hours ago, ..Kev said:

First off, never run end grain through a planer!  That's inviting trouble you don't want.

Can you joint the individual pieces to get them flat?

I run a 40T blade most of the time and don't have this issue.

That's exactly the part I'm on, I want them to be flat before I glue them up because the gaps are pretty big, I'll admit my fence isn't 100% true, I got it the best I could for an amateur, I havent exposed end grain yet

5 hours ago, JohnG said:

I'm not sure I fully understand what you're describing but it sounds like something is out of alignment on your saw, or the stock you are using is not straight to begin with. Can you post a couple pictures of the issue or go into more detail about what steps you have taken so far?

I'm sure something is out too but I've done my best to make it true, it's a hybrid delta and I wish I just bought a better saw, I've just done first step and cut all the sizes and I'm ready to glue up but I have tons of gaps

3 hours ago, gee-dub said:

I agree a pic would help.  If this is a rip cut, how are you creating the flat edge to run along the fence.  If you are not creating a flat reference edge, your trouble starts here.  Compound that by all the cuts and parts in an end grain cutting board and you have problems.  If this is a different cut at a different step, I guess I need a picture ;-)

I just used the factory flat side. One side was milled and opposite side had rugged edge so I used the flat side against my fence 

 

2 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

Any chance you are cutting from one face, then flipping the board to cut through from the opposite face? I can't understand how the circular blade can make a bulge in the middle of the edge if you are cutting through in one pass.

If taking multiple passes, having the blade off square to the table might cause this.

I'm doing something wrong but I'm not sure what and I just cut 1 side off the side from previous cut, no flipping, I used a widely to make sure blade was 90 degree to table, maybe the wixley is off?

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That looks like a job for the jointer. I think the blade is making to rough a cut. Do you own a jointer, or a hand plane to clean that cut edge?

If not, sandpaper stuck to your saw table can work, but you must be careful to hold the workpiece square to the surface.

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Is it my bad eyes or is that throat plate sitting above the saw table? If it is first job would be to make one that fits correctly. You will have a hard time getting a good cut if the stock is moving.

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From your comments, OP, it sounds like you need to do a serious calibration of that saw:

1. Get the blade parallel with the miter slot

2. Set the fence parallel with the miter slot. Some like to have the back of the fence slightly farther from the blade, but it should be no more that a couple of thousandths out.

3. Adjust the insert plate so it's perfectly flush with the table.

There are a ton of videos showing how to do this, so I won't try to explain it here. Here's a good place to start: The Wood Whisperer

Right now you're just fighting the saw.

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+1 to what @drzaius said. It may not the nicest saw on the market but it is more than good enough to make decent cuts (Unless it has been damaged).
 

Take your time calibrating it, and it may take several adjustments on the same part- sometimes adjusting one thing will affect another. Don’t expect to have it dialed in in 15 minutes. Make sure the tools you use to calibrate the saw are square and true. 
 

I’m still not sure the issue is truly resulting from your saw, but you’ll only have frustration and problems if you continue to use the saw out of alignment. 

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One thing ill throw in here, is that when using the digital gauge to set the blade to 90 degrees, dont just set it until it hits 90.0 degrees and call it good. To me, its still not close enough. Get it close with the gauge, then fine adjust by making test cuts on a thicker piece of material and use a good square to check its dead on. If it isnt, keep adjusting the blade until it is.

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16 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

That looks like a job for the jointer. I think the blade is making to rough a cut. Do you own a jointer, or a hand plane to clean that cut edge?

If not, sandpaper stuck to your saw table can work, but you must be careful to hold the workpiece square to the surface.

Unfortunately I don't own either, I do want to pick up a planer or jointer during black friday

13 hours ago, pkinneb said:

Is it my bad eyes or is that throat plate sitting above the saw table? If it is first job would be to make one that fits correctly. You will have a hard time getting a good cut if the stock is moving.

It's just a tad under the cast iron

13 hours ago, Mark J said:

Also, if you haven't already done it, the Wixey should be zeroed out on the table.

Yeah I did do that

12 hours ago, drzaius said:

From your comments, OP, it sounds like you need to do a serious calibration of that saw:

1. Get the blade parallel with the miter slot

2. Set the fence parallel with the miter slot. Some like to have the back of the fence slightly farther from the blade, but it should be no more that a couple of thousandths out.

3. Adjust the insert plate so it's perfectly flush with the table.

There are a ton of videos showing how to do this, so I won't try to explain it here. Here's a good place to start: The Wood Whisperer

Right now you're just fighting the saw.

Yeah I'll mess with it again, I think the problem is I don't have a tool that's square, I only have a carpenter's and framing square from empire which I'm pretty neither is accurate especially my framing square as it looks like 89 degrees just from my naked eye

12 hours ago, JohnG said:

+1 to what @drzaius said. It may not the nicest saw on the market but it is more than good enough to make decent cuts (Unless it has been damaged).
 

Take your time calibrating it, and it may take several adjustments on the same part- sometimes adjusting one thing will affect another. Don’t expect to have it dialed in in 15 minutes. Make sure the tools you use to calibrate the saw are square and true. 
 

I’m still not sure the issue is truly resulting from your saw, but you’ll only have frustration and problems if you continue to use the saw out of alignment. 

I'll do my best to give another go I already spent 2 hours trying to get it square but I knew after I gave up it wasnt perfect but as close as I could get it, for the longest time I fought with the fence as I noticed with I clamp the fence down the end of the fence would shift left making end of fence closer to saw blade, but I sorta fixed it, but there is a lot of play when I move the fence, I really don't like it. 

Anyone have suggestions on a square or any device to help me with getting the alignment fixed? I'm pretty sure neither of my empire squares are accurate, I mean I paid 5$ each. I bought cheap tools to make sure I like the hobby and I do. I wish I bought the best I could afford back when I started. I can afford a saw stop right now, but I want to wait till I move out of Taxifornia so I don't have to move it, thanks in advance

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8 minutes ago, Valleyslim said:

Yeah I'll mess with it again, I think the problem is I don't have a tool that's square, I only have a carpenter's and framing square from empire which I'm pretty neither is accurate especially my framing square as it looks like 89 degrees just from my naked eye

Get yourself a dial indicator (not expensive) for aligning the fence & blade and get a decent square for getting the 90* & 45* stops set on the blade & miter guide. And don't 'mess with it again'. Go watch some videos on the process, get the tools you need, and be thorough & methodical about getting the thing calibrated.

 

12 minutes ago, Valleyslim said:

I bought cheap tools to make sure I like the hobby and I do.

Buying bad tools will only ensure that you will hate the hobby :wacko: 

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I didn't want to quote all that to erase a bunch for what I had to say...

Empire tools can not be counted on to be square!

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So I'm also building a mobile kitchen island for my small kitchen and I built the counter top for it and I'm designing the base for it but then I realized that the glue up with those went very good in my opinion. The wood is only about 3/4 inch thick (I wish I bought think cedar planks but oh well) but I didn't mess with blade or fence alignment, and all cuts were made with same tablesaw, the way the cedar is glued is exactly how I want my cutting boards to look, so does the thickness of wood make a difference in forgiveness? I can barely see the lines of where I glued up my cedar planks. Also what's a good square, I was debating about picking up woodpeckers, also thanks everyone for the help

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The cedar panel looks great!

Any square that provides a true perpendicular reference is a 'good' square. Test yours by placing the head against a known straight edge, like a factory edge on plywood. Draw a line along the blade, then flip the head over so the opposite side of the blade is against the wood, and mark another line. If the lines are parallel, your square registers true 90.

Harry J Epstien sells good squares and other tool at good prices, as they are 'factory seconds', perhaps scratched or incorrectly painted. PEC is a popular brand from their web site. Woodpeckers stuff is very precise, but pricey. I don't care to pay so much for aluminum that my fumble fingers are eventually going to drop on the concrete floor and damage.

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What wtnhighlander said.  Also Starrette's expensive line (they make cheap stuff, too.).   

If you're unsure what types of square to buy a Rockler or Woodcraft store could give you some guidance, if there's one nearby.  I have a Starrett combination square and then some Woodpeckers items, a couple of three squares (fixed blade), a 45* triangle and 3' straight edge.  I got some on sale and others when a need arose. 

I didn't know about Epstein, and sometimes I just "needed it today".  I don't regret the purchases, because I no longer remember what I paid.  I store them carefully and they are there when the task matters.  

When you test out what you buy, be sure to test out both sides of both blades of the square.

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I have gotten lucky with a couple Empire items, but also recently got one that was WAY out of square. Fat 1/8” off over 12”. 
 

I have heard good things about the Kinex brand (available on Amazon) and they are reasonably priced, but I don’t have any personal experience with them. 

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