Chestnut

Dealing with thinner lumber

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I have the dining table I'm goign to make for my sister. Unfortunately the lumber that is slated to be used for this project is just too thin for the top. I wanted to get some advise or feedback on gluing up 2 layers of material to turn  3/4" thick material in to 1_1/2" thick material. My plan is to do an under bevel that will disguise the glue line from view when standing or most angles other than strait on.

My concern is that there will be some stability issues with  gluing material together like this. I'm not sure if i should glue up a bunch of boards (A) to the thickness i want and then treat them like they are 8/4 lumber, or If i should do something different . My other thought is to stagger the seams (B) so a seam on the top surface doesn't match a seam on the lower surface. The image below might help clarify.

1202969779_ElizabethTable-Model.thumb.jpg.33beacb6e6d0045e3aa9e45fc687b4f3.jpg

Thoughts?

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I have a kitchen worktop 60mm thick made of 2 layers of 30mm timber. This is a bought-in item, not something I made myself. It is glued up like your option A. There have been no problems with it. If I were doing it myself though I would probably go for option B, for no very good reason.

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My un-scientific thinking would be to go with B.  In A it looks like you are asking a lot of the end grain glue. But I really like Bmac's idea for the perimeter.   You would have the look you want and less weight to the whole piece.

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34 minutes ago, Bmac said:

I would lean more toward A, I think it would be easier construction wise. 
Another thought, could you just glue up the the perimeter for your bevel and to give it the appearance of a thicker table leaving the middle of the table 3/4 inch thick?

Thought about this but the end grain would create issues and the lumber is seriously cheap like practically free. My other concern is 3/4" thick top on a 42" span. I wasn't sure if there would be enough strength there. The way the legs are designed it doesn't leave a lot of options for aprons. I suppose i could do 1 to 2 intermediate supports like Marc's knockdown trestle table.

31 minutes ago, Chet said:

My un-scientific thinking would be to go with B.  In A it looks like you are asking a lot of the end grain glue. But I really like Bmac's idea for the perimeter.   You would have the look you want and less weight to the whole piece.

Both situations are going to e face grain and edge grain glue. All end grain will point out the end of the table. Think of it like 2 tops glued together to add thickness.

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Yes but in A they are all lined up on the same plane, B they are staggered,  thats all I was thinking.

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I don’t think a a table as small as you are looking at, 4’ x approx 3’, will have a problem with 3/4” stock, esp if you “framed” it with another layer. I was thinking you could put the extra thickness far enough under the table to attach the apron. So let’s say you frame the bottom with 4” of extra stock and at the end grain I would not put the 4” piece across the grain, I would use a series of 4” long pieces that would match the grain direction of the top. Also you could glue extra thickness where the bottom supports attach. 
I guess my suggestion would be more in line with expensive stock. Nevertheless, gluing up two boards for the whole top would also work well, but that’s a lot of gluing and I would think more work than if you just did the frame idea.
I’m assuming you be needing to glue up two boards or maybe three for the legs, correct?

i do like the design.

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41 minutes ago, Chet said:

Yes but in A they are all lined up on the same plane, B they are staggered,  thats all I was thinking.

Ahh i misunderstood your comment i get it now.. I like Bmacs idea as well Maybe I'll do a trial to see how things work out.

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1 minute ago, Bmac said:

I’m assuming you be needing to glue up two boards or maybe three for the legs, correct?

Really depends on milling. The rough state is 1"ish the boards are pretty consistent but it's from a backwoods mill. Guy knew how to run it though I'll give him that, he sawed for grade pretty well.

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I would do a single layer with perimeter thicker and put bread board end on the table to cover the end grain. To add thickness to the center use plywood. Cut it 1/4 smaller than the recess and screw it in from the bottom  with expansion slots.

I think you are spending a lot of time and effort do a 2 layer glue-up that you will never see....

Just my opinion.

Jeremy

 

 

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I just saw somewhere? the guy wanted a great big table with a thick edge. Weight was going to be a problem, so he milled all the boards at half the desired thickness, but several inches long. A piece was then cut off each end of each board. Each of those end pieces was folded under and glued to the underside of it's respective 'parent' board. He said because it was done this way that the grain matched so well that it was very inconspicuous & looked like a solid, thicker piece. The boards were glued together like your option A.

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4 minutes ago, drzaius said:

A piece was then cut off each end of each board. Each of those end pieces was folded under and glued to the underside of it's respective 'parent' board.

Did he cut those at a 45?

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45 minutes ago, Chet said:

Did he cut those at a 45?

Seems like you'd want to cut them at 90* so the ends would look like end grain at twice the thickness, no?

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12 hours ago, drzaius said:

I just saw somewhere? the guy wanted a great big table with a thick edge. Weight was going to be a problem, so he milled all the boards at half the desired thickness, but several inches long. A piece was then cut off each end of each board. Each of those end pieces was folded under and glued to the underside of it's respective 'parent' board. He said because it was done this way that the grain matched so well that it was very inconspicuous & looked like a solid, thicker piece. The boards were glued together like your option A.

*face palm*

I've done that before. I made some serving trays a long time ago. I think this is the ticket.

1121192132_HDR.jpg

1121192132.jpg

Edited by Chestnut
edited for spelling

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I agree with BMac for a lot of reasons. 2nd choice is A gluing each pairs of boards to 1 1/2" before gluing for width. I would not use B.

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