Sign in to follow this  
kaitlin

Table sealant help?

Recommended Posts

I hope this doesn't sound like  a completely stupid question but my husband and I just purchased a dining table that we didn't do our homework on first before buying.  It is a beautiful table, but looking at reviews we are seeing a lot of bad comments due to water marks and finish coming off?  Seems like a lot of people are reporting their table being ruined from sweating glasses (not even left overnight), or even hot bowls/mugs leaving rings or causing swelling.  We love the table and wondered if there was any suggestions of a sealant we could put on ourselves to protect it from this problem? Or if that would be more trouble than its worth and we should just return the table before we too are sorry.  It is the "Bradding Dining Table" from Pier 1 if that makes a difference made from rubberwood, engineered wood, and acacia wood?  We don't have a lot of knowledge about wood or finishes and would love to be able to put in a little elbow grease and keep the table and keep it pretty for a long time if possible?  Thanks for any insight you all can provide.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can tell you that the issues you describe are much more likely to be due to the finish than the wood underneath.  Can you find out from Pier 1 how the table was finished?  With that info folks here might have some suggestions.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The most effective (and cheapest to implement) method for protecting the finish from damage caused by sweating drink glasses is a good supply of coasters.

Barring that, a durable topcoat MAY help, but nothing short of a pour-over epoxy "bar top" finish will fully eliminate the possibility. My suggestion, if coasters aren't going to work for you, is to lightly sand the surface with 220 grit or higher paper, clean thoroughly, apply 1 or 2 coats of dewaxed shellac (Zinser Seal Coat works) as a barrier coat, and after it cures for a few days, apply as many coats of polyurathane as you like. 

Shellac adheres to most other finishes, hence the barrier coat over the unknown existing finish. I like wipe-on styles of polyurathane, it just seems easier to get a smooth coat, without resorting to expensive spray gear. Follow directions on the can.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My night table top is finished with 2 coats of brush on poly. I keep a water bottle there & quite often it sweats, or I'll slop a little water in the middle of the night. Been doing that for about 15 years with no ill effects. Surprises the heck out of me how durable that finish is.

I'd do just as @wtnhighlander suggested above.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this