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wtnhighlander

Wood block flooring?

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Anyone have experience with this type of floor covering? I ran across a video on YT that sparked my interest. A Google search later, and I found that wood blocks were often used as street pavers between 1840 and 1920 or so. Chicago has at least one street still paved this way, with most of the black locust blocks being replaced in 2012, after 103 years of service.  Seems like an interesting alternative to flat sawn wood planks for floor covering.

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A friend of mine lives on a street that was just replaced. The street was paved with wood cobbles that were soaked in creosote. I guess the salvaged as much of the cobbles as they could and replaced them in a sidewalk or something to appease the historical society.

Are you saying we should start saving our scraps and cover our shop floors in scraps?

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The tech school that I ettended too many years ago had some floors that were end grain wood blocks.  If I remember right they were bed in sand . Ok for walking but not very smooth or easy to clean with anything other than broom.

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There is an old house barn, not far from here, that still has such a floor in the ailseway.  It's on an early 19th Century Plantation.  The floor is in pretty bad shape, but you can still tell what it is, and is pleasant to walk on. It was not creosoted.  I'm sure it would have been nice to horse feet with horseshoes.

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I used to visit an old factory in Cleveland, OH. The floor of the oldest part was 6x6 pieces set on end. From all the years, it looked like it had soaked up a lot of oil and dirt. Don't think it was creosoted, may have been but I really didn't get into that.

FWIW, I thought of doing our living room and hall in plywood, cut into strips. Saw one on the 'Net- plywood was cut into what looked like 10 inch boards with thin walnut strips (maybe 1/4 inch) filling all the seams. Sanded and finished. Looked great!!!

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There's a local company that lists on CL selling recycled barnwood in brick size.  I don't know how that would wear, but it does look nice on a wall, if you like that sort of thing.

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Most of the applications I found mentioned were industrial facilities with heavy machinery that needed isolation to dampen vibration. Several DIY bloggers have posted their experience, and the results look pretty nice. I'd like to try it, but hate to lose a couple inches of vertical space.

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