Mark J

Table Saw Setup and Use

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So I'm using a dial indicator and a purpose specific mount that rides in the miter slot.  Measuring from the left miter slot the back of my table saw blade measures 4 thousandths toward saw right.  Measuring from the right miter slot the deviation is 6 thousandths to saw right.  I'm willing to ignore the 2 thou difference in the measurements and call it 5 thou.  But is that enough of an error that I should try to correct the alignment.  I now Marc is fairly tollerant in his setup video, but what about you guys?  It is a SawStop ICS, so left tilt with extension table to the right.

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Fixed it.  This is the third time today that a post has multiplied.  I got to find someone smarter then me to find out why it happens.

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I would want it better than that, especially if the blade is squeezing towards the fence.  I wouldn't want over a couple of thou the other way, but like dead on.  I probably should add that I don't use a splitter, or any other such device.

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Tom and I are probably the minority’s. I know, torpedo to the stomach one day! 

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5 hours ago, Chet said:

Fixed it.  This is the third time today that a post has multiplied.  I got to find someone smarter then me to find out why it happens.

I had to try multiple times to get the post to "submit" due to what I think was a slow server, but I only saw one copy post.

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Mark, I’m sure others will disagree but, I personally think you’re there. I’m not sure I own anything that measures in the thousands and I couldn’t read it it if I did. I just always use precaution on all rip cuts and back off if there is an indication of a problem. 

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So I spent yesterday setting up the SawStop I bought last summer at the estate sale.  It needed a few taps and tweaks, but most everything checked out.  So last night I used it to cut down some 2' x 4' plywood panels.  

I was struck by the fact that I don't think I've cut anything on a TS in a few decades, and secondly that I didn't feel real comfortable cutting the unwieldy panels.  I certainly wasn't getting straight cuts.

Checking TWW I see Marc recommends this video:  

https://passionforwood.com/woodworking/dvds-tablesaw/

Care to share any thoughts?

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I have no issues cutting panels up to that size on a table saw but I typically break down sheet goods with my track saw and then if needed clean them up on the TS.

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I mostly break down sheet goods with a guide & circular saw into manageable sizes & then use the TS to trim to final size. If I have a big project using a lot of plywood, I'll set up an auxiliary in feed table and another extension to the left of the blade. The key to accurate cuts is to have the sheet fully supported for the full cut, from start to finish. That way, I'm not stressing & fighting to hold the sheet as well as trying to keep it tight to the fence. And I'll give the tables & fence a fresh coat of wax.

With all that setup, it's easy to break down a ton of sheet goods very quickly & accurately. The hardest part is getting the sheet up on the table. There are lots of dollies & devices to ease the carrying & handling of sheet goods. You just have to do a search & pick the ones that will work for you in your shop.

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A local supplier has become a friend. When I need sheet goods I map out the first rips. Usually somewhere around 24". From there it is very easy to handle. But he just sold his business and it closes in March. I hope the next guy will do the first rip also. I can handle full sheets. But ripped in half is a luxury.

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I used to have a flat topped cart on casters.  Sheets of plywood would come out of the truck, onto the cart, and it could roll up to the front of the tablesaw.  It ended up taking up too much room, but if room was unlimited, I've still have one.

Now, a helper takes one side to help place it on the saw, and I hold the far corner from the fence, keeping it against the fence as it's pushed through.  The helper catches the offcut, which slides on the outfeed table, but he also helps keep it against the fence when it gets within his reach.   We break down cabinet plywood to finished width as it comes off the truck.

If I was doing it by myself, I would have to have the flat topped cart/infeed table.

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On 1/14/2020 at 8:16 PM, Coop said:

Tom and I are probably the minority’s. I know, torpedo to the stomach one day! 

Torpedoing a smaller piece of MDF to my gut one day was the cheap lesson I needed to always use a splitter.

That said, I always have my fence open a tiny bit out the outfeed end of the saw. Real thick pieces I don’t even cut on the TS; that’s become a bandsaw job to avoid pinching and resulting burning. Which neither fence alignment nor a splitter can resolve if there’s tension internal to the board. 

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I had to make a table setup at work. It worked pretty good. I'm not much for the cart to saw deal . I'm too use to as a cabinet maker pulling out the rack one end on the saw lifting the other to cut.the same when I cut melamine in commercial. I don't have room for it in my garage.

Right after I built this saw setup they bought a sawstop..

 

IMG_0315.JPG.32eb2d4a7eacae7dd08e5ec434906164.jpeg

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I came across this website which may be of general interest.  It's not clear who is responsible for the information (they don't seem to be selling something), but it appears quite informative.  

http://circularsawblade.net/

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I had a quick look at that site & it seems like a good resource. No hint of who is behind the site and I couldn't find anything for sale there. There is plenty of advertising, which probably is what pays for the site.

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With a left tilt saw the fence should be on the right, but what about the miter guage?  Does that matter much?

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The fence is on the right for left tilt or right tilt. However, when cutting a bevel on a right tilt saw, you want to move the fence to the left of the blade. Otherwise, the stock gets captured between the fence & blade, leading to burning, rough cut, or kickback. I would also use the miter guide on the side that is away from the tilt.

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