Adrien Lippmann

Wood varnish for kids enduring boiling water

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On 2/14/2020 at 8:00 PM, Chet said:

If i understand the OP, I think this is going to be a product test done by a government entity and if it passes the test then the toys can safely end up in the hands of a child.

Exactly !

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On 2/14/2020 at 8:34 PM, Chestnut said:

Yep that is how I'm reading it. Don't have to worry about toxic compounds if you don't add anything to the surface of the wood. Wood is cellulose and isn't classified as a toxic substance for ingestion. Cellulose is added to food products as filler after all.

To put a finish on that will degrade quickly and never last through a wash, is just begging for negative product feedback. Trying to educate the consumer on finish reapplication isn't going to be easy or will turn away customers. I'd use a hardwood that would hold up well for a good many years and would take well to sanding to a high grit. Hard maple, cherry, or some other small pore hardwood would be my choice.

Also trying to work something in this direction. But as I want to produce locally, not so many type of wood I can use ! But thanks, I do agree with you, would be one of the best options

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On 2/14/2020 at 8:41 PM, Ronn W said:

Any other toy makers around that you could talk to?  See what they use?

Not really… sadly !

On 2/15/2020 at 5:15 AM, wtnhighlander said:

Makes me wonder what kind of toy is made of wood and latex?

Kind a of teether :)

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3 hours ago, Adrien Lippmann said:

Don't know about this process… Could you telle me a bit more ?

Infusing is a process by which resin is drawn into the wood under vacuum, then heat-cured. Typically used for small-ish turnings that use partially decomposed wood for its appearance. The resin hardens the soft wood and fills the pores.

For a teether, I would avoid using any finish that forms a film on the wood surface. It will very likely flake off during use, causing irritation of the soft tissues, or worse.

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10 minutes ago, wtnhighlander said:

Infusing is a process by which resin is drawn into the wood under vacuum, then heat-cured. Typically used for small-ish turnings that use partially decomposed wood for its appearance. The resin hardens the soft wood and fills the pores.

For a teether, I would avoid using any finish that forms a film on the wood surface. It will very likely flake off during use, causing irritation of the soft tissues, or worse.

Ok thank you for those details on the process. I will then try different options and see how it reacts

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I was standing in my shop and I saw my can of this sitting on the shelf. https://www.amazon.com/Watco-241758-Butcher-Block-Finish/dp/B000VITOT4

I have it applied to a small shelf/bench that lives in out main shower to hold toiletries and also acts as a foot rest for my fiancee to shave her legs. After 2 years of getting drenched with hot water daily it still looks good. Don't know if you can get it there. It is advertised as being food grade after it's cured.

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On 2/17/2020 at 3:14 PM, Chestnut said:

I was standing in my shop and I saw my can of this sitting on the shelf. https://www.amazon.com/Watco-241758-Butcher-Block-Finish/dp/B000VITOT4

I have it applied to a small shelf/bench that lives in out main shower to hold toiletries and also acts as a foot rest for my fiancee to shave her legs. After 2 years of getting drenched with hot water daily it still looks good. Don't know if you can get it there. It is advertised as being food grade after it's cured.

Ok thank you very much, I'll have a look to this product

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On ‎2‎/‎17‎/‎2020 at 8:14 AM, Chestnut said:

I was standing in my shop and I saw my can of this sitting on the shelf. https://www.amazon.com/Watco-241758-Butcher-Block-Finish/dp/B000VITOT4

I have it applied to a small shelf/bench that lives in out main shower to hold toiletries and also acts as a foot rest for my fiancee to shave her legs. After 2 years of getting drenched with hot water daily it still looks good. Don't know if you can get it there. It is advertised as being food grade after it's cured.

This is what I was thinking. Most basic oils should be food safe. Mineral oil for example is fine. It might not do the best with the boiling, but won't become dangerous. 

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I get the need to pass the government test of boiling water for 10 minutes, but I wouldn't expect ANY of these finishes to survive such treatment in actual use, any better than bare wood.

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8 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

I get the need to pass the government test of boiling water for 10 minutes, but I wouldn't expect ANY of these finishes to survive such treatment in actual use, any better than bare wood.

I guess you're right, but Ill try with some different finishes, just in case by magic I found the good one ! But thanks a lot

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11 hours ago, Isaac said:

This is what I was thinking. Most basic oils should be food safe. Mineral oil for example is fine. It might not do the best with the boiling, but won't become dangerous. 

Surely, I'll have to try to know, I'll all let you know once I've runned the tests. Thank you !

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So the boiling water test is just on 1 toy right? Every toy doesn't need to undergo this test before it gets sold does it?

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"Wood varnish for kids enduring boiling water"

Every time I read this header I get a very disturbing image.

Any food safe finish (and most everything is food safe after it cures fully) should be fine. I would go with the recommendation of Osmo or Livos Kunos. Just let it cure fully before giving it to the kids.

 

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3 hours ago, Chestnut said:

So the boiling water test is just on 1 toy right? Every toy doesn't need to undergo this test before it gets sold does it?

That's how I understood the original post. One, or perhaps a representative sample of the toys would be tested. But the OP mentioned that the toys would be subject to 'sterilization'. If he is making these teething toys as a commercial product, it seems reasonable that the end users may expect to run baby teethers through the dishwasher or boil them. In which case, I doubt any typical wood finish will hold up for long.

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