Hammer5573

My Router Table Project

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I've always enjoyed using my router table but I would get frustrated because I wasn't able to make small precision adjustments and because I would consistently get sniped on the outfeed end. I once purchased a higher end router table with a split fence and it was a disaster. I made so many modifications to the table that it wasn't recognizable. I made a number of attempts to make a router fence that could be adjusted in a very precise manner while moving evenly on both sides as it was adjusted. I just couldn't make one that I was satisfied with so I decided that instead of moving the fence to make the adjustments that I would move the router instead. I fabricated a frame made of 1x1x1/8" tubular steel and made a router carriage attached to the frame using premium drawer glides and a basic crank mechanism. The deck is 1 1/2" thick covered with a piece of Formica that I obtained from a local cabinet shop. The fence is made of 3/4" thick extruded aluminum and can be easily removed by loosening two knobs. The dust collection box is attached to the bottom of the router carriage and the box and the drawer fronts are veneered with paper-backed teak that I had leftover in the shop. So far, the trials a promising.

 

 

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Nice piece of furniture! What sort of stuff are you making that needs such precision in the router cuts?

Most of my education in router table use came from The Router Workshop when it was on my local PBS station. Precision adjustment was generall done with a claw hammer, successfully.

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As I said previously, I'm hoping that I can prevent the snipe that was occurring on the outfeed end of my cuts due to the fence being uneven and the wood falling of the guide bearing. I've been using harder woods lately and I'm planning to use some of the really hard exotic stuff soon. I'm hoping that I can make small progressive cuts quickly and avoid dulling the bits and burning the wood. I may be all wet in my thinking but it was a fun project..!

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I generally use a test piece the same size, often same material, before I make my cuts on the router table. If breakout at the end could be a problem, I follow it with a piece of some scrap as a backer. 
As for adjustments, i do the tap method, I never have anything that requires super duper precision I guess. 
Your table looks rock solid and quite useful, so let us know if it works the way you wanted it to :) I’m curious.

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Apparently I'm not the only woodworker interested in precision routing. Take a look at the delivery time on the Incra Precision Router Tool

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