RunnerRN

Help with stain/finish

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I was wondering if anyone had any ideas what might have been used to get this color finish.  I asked the guy who made and posted it but he didn't want to give out this information.

69841542_2459258454159055_2870752640248053760_n.jpg

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Hard to say for certain, even what type of wood that is. From the dimensions, and presence of the pith in both boards, I'm guessing 'SPF' construction lumber. I think yellow pine would show more grain on the faces.

Anyway, the species used will have its own color properties, and will affect the result for any type of translucent coating you apply. White balance of the photograph will also throw our guesses off a bit. Off the top of my head, I'd say that was colored with Minwax Ipswitch pine or Puritan pine, followed by an oil-based polyurathane top coat, which adds more amber tone.

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My impression is that a clear finish with an amber tone, maybe danish oil, was applied and then the whole top was skip sanded. You can still see the milling marks and areas that look like bare wood.

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3 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

Hard to say for certain, even what type of wood that is. From the dimensions, and presence of the pith in both boards, I'm guessing 'SPF' construction lumber. I think yellow pine would show more grain on the faces.

Anyway, the species used will have its own color properties, and will affect the result for any type of translucent coating you apply. White balance of the photograph will also throw our guesses off a bit. Off the top of my head, I'd say that was colored with Minwax Ipswitch pine or Puritan pine, followed by an oil-based polyurathane top coat, which adds more amber tone.

Thanks.  I was thinking maybe it was some type of pine stain but with something added.  Do you you think  there is anyway my table  could look similar to this or is the wood on mine totally different?

NEc6QnpCRXGUVrMfXO77zQ.jpg

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1 hour ago, Wimayo said:

My impression is that a clear finish with an amber tone, maybe danish oil, was applied and then the whole top was skip sanded. You can still see the milling marks and areas that look like bare wood.

Do you think it was plain Danish oil or colored?  What exactly is skip sanding?

 

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The boards in your table top have the appearance of southern yellow pine, evidenced by the distinct grain lines that are not so apparent in the example image. SYP has a natural yellow-ish tone, and would likely appear a bit darker than the example, even with the exact formula applied.

Ideally, you should use samples of the same wood as your table, prepared in the same way, to experiment with. Color matching often requires a good deal of trial and error. If you want to try a tinted Danish oil, the Watco brand found in most home centers has a color called 'Fruitwood', that would be a pretty close match, IMO.

Be aware that tinted Danish oil contains fine particulare pigments, so mix it well and frequently as you apply, to keep the color suspended in the liquid. Typical application is to flood the surface, allow to stand for a few minutes, then wipe away the excess. Allow to dry as directed on the label, and repeat as desired.

The 'skip sanding' mentioned by @Wimayo is a process of smoothin away the saw marks in some areas, while only 'softening' other areas with light sanding, leaving patches of texture.

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Thanks for your reply.  I tried the medium walnut  a month ago and some parts of it seemed to take on orange tinge.  It was on a piece of scrap wood though.  Not sure how fruitwood would look.  The sample color or it looks more pinkish tinged than gold like the one on his table.  What do you think tung oil would look like.  I know I'm all over the place trying to find something that will look good and it is going to be a lot of trial and error.  I have yet to try....tung oil, just polyurethane, a gel stain or dye stain.  Hopefully I won't have to spend all my $ on this trial and error!  LOL

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If it were me trying to please my right brain I would give up on adding color to the pine.  Pine (of any kind) just doesn't want to cooperate with this plan.  Again, me, I would use an oil based polyurethane varnish which will add some amber tone to the wood (more than water born will), paint the trestle bottom as you have suggested and enjoy the piece.  And if at the end of the day my right brain was still grumpy about it, well left brain says I don't have to keep the table forever.  

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General Fishes Arm-R-Seal or Minwax Wipe'on poly are good choices. Apply over clean bare wood.

Depending on the 'feel' you want, Danish oil soaks in and leaves little film unless you apply many coats. Over time, most pines will darken to a rich amber color with just danish oil. They may also darken under polyurathane, but I don't have the long term experience to confirm.

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Does polyurethane leave a film?  Which one is more durable?  I just went out and bought the wipe on poly in satin by minwax, but now I'm not sure if the danish oil is a better choice?  I haven't opened it yet.

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The wipe-on poly does build a film, and will be more durable. It will also look and feel more like plastic than wood. The satin sheen will help it not look like plastic so much. Just avoid laying on more that 4 coats, unless you really need the extra protection. 

Moisten a clean cotton rag (old t-shirt) with mineral spirits, pour a little poly onto the surface, and wipe it around, completely covering the surface, but leave no puddles. First coat will likely require heavier application than later coats, and linger 'drying' time. It will also soak in, leaving the surface feeling almost raw. After it is no longer tacky, lightly sand with a grit at least as high as the final sanding of the wood, or higher. The following coats will require less and less liquid. By the 3rd or 4th coat, you should be using very little material to get coverage. I like to wipe on that last coat in full-length strokes, end to end, in the direction of the grain. The result should be smooth and slick, free of any drips or runs. Should be ready for light use withing 48 hrs of the final coat.

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  Thanks!  What grit of sand paper should I use after the first coat and then the final coat?  I also had put some prestain conditioner when I was planning to use stain.  Should I wipe the whole piece down first with mineral spirits?

 

 

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Mineral spirit wipedown can help remove dust. Let it flas off before applying finish. I normally use 600 grit between coats of finish, nothing more than a brown paper bag after the final coat. Even that is overkill with satin.

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22 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

Ideally, you should use samples of the same wood as your table, prepared in the same way, to experiment with. Color matching often requires a good deal of trial and error. If you want to try a tinted Danish oil, the Watco brand found in most home centers has a color called 'Fruitwood', that would be a pretty close match, IMO.

The 'skip sanding' mentioned by @Wimayo is a process of smoothin away the saw marks in some areas, while only 'softening' other areas with light sanding, leaving patches of texture.

I was thinking that it looks a bit like Watco teak oil; kind of a yellowish brown. Experimenting is the way to go. In the end, I don't think it matters if it is a film or oil finish as long as you find the color you want. Also, I don't think the OP will get the same look as the first example because he has sanded it smooth taking out the original milling marks.

Thanks for the skip sanding explanation.

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4 hours ago, RunnerRN said:

What grit should I use just before  applying the polyurethane to the  raw wood?  Sorry for so many questions!  

 

 

 

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4 minutes ago, RunnerRN said:

 

You already sanded to a pretty high grit, didn't you? 220 or higher should be ok. The very high grits discussed before were to help even out stain absorbtion, and not really needed for an unpigmented topcoat alone.

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I finally decided to go ahead with just the polyurethane.  I applied the first coat last night.  What grit should I use to sand it now and how should I apply the next few coats....how many more, what grit of sandpaper and drying time in between.  Thanks!

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I like to lightly block sand with 400 grit between coats.  The idea is just to knock off the dust nibs..  As for how many coats, that depends on the look you want.  When it looks the way you want it to look, you're done.

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On 2/17/2020 at 10:07 AM, Mark J said:

If it were me trying to please my right brain I would give up on adding color to the pine.  Pine (of any kind) just doesn't want to cooperate with this plan.  Again, me, I would use an oil based polyurethane varnish which will add some amber tone to the wood (more than water born will), paint the trestle bottom as you have suggested and enjoy the piece.  And if at the end of the day my right brain was still grumpy about it, well left brain says I don't have to keep the table forever.  

I have only applied one coat of the polyurethane but don't notice an amber tone.  Will this occur over time?

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No, you will see the ambering as you apply the sutface coating.  In fact it will appear a little less pronounced after the material has cured.  

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