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Cliff

Moving around large tools

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When you guys buy new stationary machines, and they drop them at the base of your driveway, how are you getting them to the shop? Last time, my bandsaw went on the big furniture dolly I had. But now I'm looking at a 15 Grizzly Planer, and the only thing I can think to do is buy a pallet jack (in city, tractor or other solution not readily available.) But that is another $300 for the Harbor Freight model. 

My Sawstop, I actually bought and brought home in a truck so I could pull up the garage and slowly ease it off. It was not fun, but doable. 

Just look for any thoughts on this. 

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I ordered drop gate, then scooted onto a dolly. Dollies are easy to fab to your needs. Screw blocks to it to keep it from sliding when you hit bumps. That also helps if the driver wants to help push. He can push the palleted tool without pushing it off the dolly. 

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Yeah, that a big fear of mine--having the delivery driver just drop it off at the curb in the middle of a thunderstorm or 6 inches of snow.  So if I'm taking delivery at "the curb" I'll have a few twenties on me in the hope that it will be a sufficient inducement to get the thing from the curb to my garage.  

The last few big items I have bought I had delivered to the Rock-Craft store.  That way I have some flexibility to pick my weather window, and then I've rented a lift gate truck and pallet jack(s).  That adds some cost, but a lot of times you don't have to pay for shipping to the store.  

My SawStop was bought used and I ended up having to hire movers to get it out of the seller's basement and into mine.  

If your looking at a new Grizzly it might make sense to rent your own lift gate and go get it.  Don't they have a store in Missouri?

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If it's going to be on a mobile base, just leap frog plywood, and roll it where it needs to go.  Have them sit in on the first sheet, and the first sheet overlaps a little onto the second sheet.  They don't even need to be full width sheets, depending on the width of the machine. 

 I've built many temporary ramps for steps.  The last time I moved a 15" planer like this (where the loader would have torn up the yard), I used a Maasdam rope puller to pull it up the steps, and got it in the house by myself.

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They are typically on a pallet so i just drag it. If my driveway sands down some of the pallet it's just less pallet to put in the trash. I'd rent a pallet jack before I bought one they are kinda big and seem like a pita to store.

Other way's I've managed this, I have a trailer and when they arrived they didn't seem to care what the freight got unloaded on to. So when i got my band saw they slid it off the lift gate onto my trailer and then just drove my trailer were I needed the saw.

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When I go my bandsaw the driver was pretty much a jerk an left it at the curb and the pallet was in horrible shape so I had to unpack everything right were it was.  Fortunately I have a pretty strong son in law that lives right next door.

When I had my Powermatic Jointer delivered the driver was a real gem.  He hopped out of the cab, asked me we're I wanted it, I pointed out the spot in the shop and he dropped it right on the money.  I tried to give him $40 for his effort and he wouldn't take it.

Same freight company both times.

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This is slope-dependent, but I have had success rolling crates and pallets with >500lbs of whatever in/on them on black iron pipes. I took them off my pipe clamps in one situation and rolled a tool in its shipping box from its drop point outside my old building, into the building, down a hallway with a concrete floor, into the elevator, and then down the hallway to my old shop space on the seventh floor. I had to use wedges (like door stops) to keep the thing from rolling as I rearranged the pipes but 45 minutes later I had the box in place.

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4 hours ago, VizslaDad said:

This is slope-dependent, but I have had success rolling crates and pallets with >500lbs of whatever in/on them on black iron pipes. I took them off my pipe clamps in one situation and rolled a tool in its shipping box from its drop point outside my old building, into the building, down a hallway with a concrete floor, into the elevator, and then down the hallway to my old shop space on the seventh floor. I had to use wedges (like door stops) to keep the thing from rolling as I rearranged the pipes but 45 minutes later I had the box in place.

We moved a 4000 lb. tank across a yard to concrete using this method. Due to the fact that the base was soil, the bottom pipes were 2” dia. . Worked great. 

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I've never had a driver refuse to roll it into the garage. I always try to tip ($20), but it isn't always accepted. My logistics are simple though (paved driveway, very mild slope).

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