Scooby

Need advice to start my woodworking journey

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Buy the wood without a trailer. When you find it  go rent a trailer. You can buy it on the spot to be picked up later. True for home depot or small yards.

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Another option is just to rent a pickup from Home Depo, etc.  You can rent by the hour and you do not need to make a purchase (besides the rental fee).  

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11 minutes ago, Mark J said:

Another option is just to rent a pickup from Home Depo, etc.  You can rent by the hour and you do not need to make a purchase (besides the rental fee).  

This is what I’ve done when I need more than a few boards, or if I need sheet goods. There is a uhaul place close by and they rent pickups for about $25-30 (including the miles I use). When I’ve done this I go ahead and buy a lot.

Never buy the 2’x4’ sheet goods at HD or Lowe’s. Buy a 4x8 sheet and ask them to cut it down to 2x4 (or similar). They typically do the first few cuts for free and the 2x4 sheets are almost as expensive as the 4x8. 

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A couple of low budget options to go with the hitch:

Bed extender.

Take care to avoid overloading / overbalancing the vehicle with this. Driving will be different, to say the least.

Folding Trailer

These have good reviews for light duty hauling, when you need to store compactly. Can carry things like lawn mowers, appliances, etc... Needs more budget, but saves hunting down a rental.

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24 minutes ago, wtnhighlander said:

A couple of low budget options to go with the hitch:

Bed extender.

Take care to avoid overloading / overbalancing the vehicle with this. Driving will be different, to say the least.

Folding Trailer

These have good reviews for light duty hauling, when you need to store compactly. Can carry things like lawn mowers, appliances, etc... Needs more budget, but saves hunting down a rental.

That's folding trailer is so attractive!!! I can just fold it up and store it in my garage when I am done. Thanks for a very nice suggestion.

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59 minutes ago, wtnhighlander said:

A couple of low budget options to go with the hitch:

Bed extender.

Take care to avoid overloading / overbalancing the vehicle with this. Driving will be different, to say the least.

Folding Trailer

These have good reviews for light duty hauling, when you need to store compactly. Can carry things like lawn mowers, appliances, etc... Needs more budget, but saves hunting down a rental.

That folding trailer I thin is good for someone that needs to haul something now and then that isn't super heavy. 150 BF of white Oak is about 800 lbs which that trailer can haul. I'm not sure of many projects that would need more than 150 BF. Keep in mind the 1,200 lbs load includes the trailer weight so you really only can put about 950 lbs on the trailer.

Once you have a trailer set up notifications on Craig's list for lumber too. The best deals I've gotten were from Craig's list. You can probably get some 1x and 2x pine for free now and then. It's a good way to knock together some prototypes or just to try something you've never done.

 

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18 minutes ago, Chestnut said:

That folding trailer I thin is good for someone that needs to haul something now and then that isn't super heavy. 150 BF of white Oak is about 800 lbs which that trailer can haul. I'm not sure of many projects that would need more than 150 BF. Keep in mind the 1,200 lbs load includes the trailer weight so you really only can put about 950 lbs on the trailer.

Once you have a trailer set up notifications on Craig's list for lumber too. The best deals I've gotten were from Craig's list. You can probably get some 1x and 2x pine for free now and then. It's a good way to knock together some prototypes or just to try something you've never done.

 

@Chestnut: thanks. The estimation of 150 BF as the haul limit is very practical. I will keep that in mind.

 

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It's surprising what you can fit into a smaller vehicle.  I drive a Buick LaCrosse, and with the rear seats folded down, I can haul a limited amount of 8' stock - it has to rest on the console between the front seats.  No problem to haul 60 bf or so of shorter (<6') stock - plenty for most of the projects I do.  Unfortunately, no way to fit 4-by sheet goods, let alone 5x5 BB.

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I used to fit 8’ 2x4s in my 1998 2 door Jeep Wrangler with all seats in and full top on. Actually fits better then the Mazda. Just rented a Uhaul pickup today for $20 plus mileage. Was great. 

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1 hour ago, pkinneb said:

No kidding i drove Ford Escorts for over a decade early in our marriage. They carried everything including lumber, pavers, retaining wall blocks, mulch, and the craziest one ever  (for me anyway) was two 1 11/2" thick by 12" wide by 12" LVL beams for a basement project :)

Seriously? How can you fit those into a sedan? 

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8 hours ago, Coop said:

Scooby, I’ll extend my offer a little further. When you get you a decent table saw and pick you a project that you would like to build, send me a pm. I’ll be glad to meet you at one of the afore mentioned 3 lumber suppliers, load the lumber in my truck and bring it back to my shop. From there we can joint and plane it and cut it into some manageable pieces that you can it take back home. Again, from the visit to my shop, you can determine what wood working machines you think would be helpful to you. And you can start with some inexpensive stuff like poplar or oak. And with minimal investment, you might think that it’s not the route you want to go after all. But hopefully you don’t decide that. 

Hi Coop,

That is sooooo sweet!!! Yes, I will hunt for a table saw and get it ready before I pm you for the trip. Having a mentor will definitely speed up my learning curve. Thanks in advance!!!

 

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On 5/20/2020 at 7:27 AM, legenddc said:

I have the Ridgid R4512 and like it but people have had issues. There's a new version out now and I've seen some strange reviews. If you have Facebook check out the Ridgid R4512 owner's Facebook group for lots of reviews and tips.

I have the same saw, with the #2 arbor (they all have it now) that replaced the one that was causing some alignment problems in the early generations. I see the saw has gone up a couple hundred since I bought mine. I like the saw; the only gripe I have is making zero clearance inserts for it since the opening around the blade is tapered. But hey, it's a skill builder for you to fit a piece in there :) I don't see any reason to get another saw, although your mileage may vary.

The planer is a requirement if you want to make actual furniture. I have the "silver standard" DeWalt 734 lunchbox type, and it's been working well for me for years. You will need a good dust collector for it though; planers make a lot of sawdust in a short amount of time. I bought the Harbor Freight DC for well under $200; lots of people have that one. I didn't have a planer when I built my bench; you won't need one either (or for building shop stands/furniture). But later projects will pretty much require one.

I bought a Cutec 6" jointer and it's reasonably priced, with the added bonus of a segmented head which is easy to keep sharp. It works for most of the projects I have, which are quite varied. It's not large, but it's a good unit and good place to start.

I like the recommendation of a hand plane. Rather than a big, long jack plane, I'd opt first for a good bench plane/block plane. I think it will provide more utility for you in chamfering edges, trimming mortises and such. A smoothing plane might be a good choice in between a block plane and a jack plane.

Also a decent set of chisels (double bevel) and a sharpening system. There are many setups for sharpening; that could (and has been) be a thread all on its own. Books have been written about sharpening; I recommend reading Ron Hock's book; it has all the scientific info you might want on metallurgy, and how to sharpen anything you have in the shop. Sharpening is one of the most important things you do in the shop. Sharp tools are safer than dull ones so don't be afraid to have very, very sharp tools. They are also a pleasure to work with.

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Oh and welcome to the forum and this wonderful hobby/occupation! It's addictive when you start to form wood into things that were previously only in your mind :)

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1 hour ago, Chip Sawdust said:

I have the same saw, with the #2 arbor (they all have it now) that replaced the one that was causing some alignment problems in the early generations. I see the saw has gone up a couple hundred since I bought mine. I like the saw; the only gripe I have is making zero clearance inserts for it since the opening around the blade is tapered. But hey, it's a skill builder for you to fit a piece in there :) I don't see any reason to get another saw, although your mileage may vary.

The planer is a requirement if you want to make actual furniture. I have the "silver standard" DeWalt 734 lunchbox type, and it's been working well for me for years. You will need a good dust collector for it though; planers make a lot of sawdust in a short amount of time. I bought the Harbor Freight DC for well under $200; lots of people have that one. I didn't have a planer when I built my bench; you won't need one either (or for building shop stands/furniture). But later projects will pretty much require one.

I bought a Cutec 6" jointer and it's reasonably priced, with the added bonus of a segmented head which is easy to keep sharp. It works for most of the projects I have, which are quite varied. It's not large, but it's a good unit and good place to start.

I like the recommendation of a hand plane. Rather than a big, long jack plane, I'd opt first for a good bench plane/block plane. I think it will provide more utility for you in chamfering edges, trimming mortises and such. A smoothing plane might be a good choice in between a block plane and a jack plane.

Also a decent set of chisels (double bevel) and a sharpening system. There are many setups for sharpening; that could (and has been) be a thread all on its own. Books have been written about sharpening; I recommend reading Ron Hock's book; it has all the scientific info you might want on metallurgy, and how to sharpen anything you have in the shop. Sharpening is one of the most important things you do in the shop. Sharp tools are safer than dull ones so don't be afraid to have very, very sharp tools. They are also a pleasure to work with.

@Chip Sawdust,

I have been looking for more info about the new Rigid R4520 table saw these days. The previous model R4512 is no longer offered in store. I also joined the FB Rigid owner group but I have not found much. Probably the R4520 is too new to the community. The review on HD about this saw is not very encouraging so I am hesitating. My budget for the table saw will be ~$700 and still looking. I heard a lot of ppl giving praise for the Delta table saw because of the fence. I will take advantage of Father Day deals and will buy one on that day. 

After receiving the feedback from our wonderful members in this forum, I also plan to save up for planer/jointer but it may take awhile. Also, thanks for your feedback about sharpening and the book. I will look into those.

 

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On 5/21/2020 at 6:42 PM, Scooby said:

Seriously? How can you fit those into a sedan? 

One at a time!!! :D

When my pickup isn't running, with its full size bed, I can haul quite a bit inside my VW Passat wagon. An 8' piece will slide up the middle, and I've stacked 6-8 pieces in there before. Not my favorite mode, but it's do-able. Have also rigged up a hauler setup for the rails on top of the car for plywood.

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Beware that plywood on top of the roof can quickly become a sail / wing. Secure it well (as you should any load), drive slow, and skip windy days.

I learned the hard way that even lumber that "almost" fits inside the vehicle can wind up scattered across the roadway in a heatbeat. Your load should be fastened into the vehicle AT LEAST as firmly as you are with a seatbelt. The last thing you want is for that one loose 2x4 to harpoon its way through the windshield if you stop a little to quickly.

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Do you also need to watch out for the speed limit of the trailer on highway? For example, I read somewhere that the fordable Harbor Freight trailer  cannot exceed 55 mph when being hauled.

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6 hours ago, Scooby said:

Do you also need to watch out for the speed limit of the trailer on highway? For example, I read somewhere that the fordable Harbor Freight trailer  cannot exceed 55 mph when being hauled.

Yes, just like everyone does with the U-Haul trailers that have "Max. Speed 45 MPH" painted on the side.

Kidding aside, I generally try to avoid major / congested roadways as much as possible when carrying ANYTHING that doesn't fit within the confines of the designated passenger or cargo areas of the vehicle. That includes hauling trailers.  Especially with a lighter vehicle, trailering can dramatically alter the driving dynamics. Lumber weight adds up quicker than you might expect, and a heavy trailer can push your vehicle, greatly extending your stopping distance, and causing the rear end to swing wide or skid if turning too quickly. Take it slow until you get a good feel for how the handling changes.  I treat it like driving on snow / ice. Keep the top speed lower than normal, and drive to avoid making ANY sudden changes in speed or direction.

Another tip for those new to using a trailer - a typical two-wheel trailer like the one from HF is designed to be "front loaded", meaning about 60% of the weight should be ahead of the axle. If the rear is loaded heavier that the front, the trailer tongue will try to lift, causing your vehicle to fish-tail. This can be severe enough to cause a crash.

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6 hours ago, Scooby said:

cannot exceed 55 mph when being hauled.

This can be a factor of two things, the total weight of the load and trailer together and then the wheels.  The wheels and tires on those trailers are fairly small and will be spinning many more times per distance traveled the the wheels and tires of your vehicle that you are pulling it with and you can over heat the bearings. 

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