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soundproofing for neighbors

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Curious if there's any way to keep the sound down in a woodshop and if you do anything like that for your neighbors? 

 

I'm finally (well hopefully) moving out of rental houses + roomate life as I'm in contingency for a house in a small town in the Sierra Nevada's of California with 2.5 acres and a detached garage where I can have my wood shop (finally!). However, my future neighbors found out I ride dirtbikes and were kind of pissed by that (says another neighbor), I noticed next time I met one of the other neighbors they really emphasized how everyone up here likes it to be quiet and that they like their outdoor gardening time. They even tried to nicely tell me about other houses and areas to check out. Anyways I understand and can respect them and not rip around on my property to much with the dirtbike but made me wonder about all the noise of my woodshop (they haven't found out about that). I had been considering insulating the garage as I plant to spend a lot of time in it but wondering if there were other means to keeping it quieter while I'm at it. I was also thinking about adding a rear single garage door to the back of the garage to help with airflow/cross breeze, I guess I could close the front door when making lots of noise and have the rear open. I think I'll be doing my power carving/grinding in that back area also as I like to do that outside, back there its pretty closed off from the neighborsand and we're at the top of the hill so I believe noise usually travels up not down. Maybe I'm overthinking all this.. you cant even see any of the neighbors houses due to the property sizes and trees, but just something on my mind.. 

 

garage front (faces toward the nearest neighbor quite a ways away)

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back of garage (neighbor behind that retaining wall and a fence to the right but non to the left or really behind):

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edge of property is a bit farther than this (front of garage is down there in the middle):

814158166_ScreenShot2020-06-24at11_26_34PM.thumb.jpg.54eeb3e25d5188353ed9f9865971bab3.jpg

 

IMG_7135.thumb.jpg.7ba18cea0bec130f1b2630474cebf016.jpg

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That looks like an awesome place, so congratulations!

I live in a similarly-spaced rural area. My current woodshop is an insulated shed, right outside the house, near the master bedroom. Tablesaw and router noise is low enough that my wife sleeps through my early morning work sessions, unless I break out the planer, a DW735.

My advice is to finish the garage interior, insulating the walls and ceiling, and use insulated garage doors. Climate control of the work space has many advantages other than personal comfort.

Outdoors, bushy evergreens can block a lot of sound, but may take a while to grow.

For power carving, look into lower-noise machines, like chainsaws and grinders that use brushless DC motors.

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High frequency is directional, low frequency passes through. Most wood shop tools that are electric generate more highs. Landscape screening was suggested, think in lines of transmission. A short section of fence reflects, opposite that green life attenuates. Shoot the directional away from neighbors and into the greenery. Insulation has been mentioned. That will do wonders. Beyond that, a lot of this is relationship. Many neighbors will make concessions if there are limits. Can you limit heavy milling noise to sessions of thirty minutes before 7:00 on weekdays? That might mimic yard mowing noise. (Are there mown yards in that neighborhood?) Just my two cents. Good luck. 

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They sound kinda rude, I'd probably suggest a few brands of good ear plugs to them and tell them to get ready.

Insulation and sheetrock will go a long way in knocking the noise down. I live in an area with 0.5 acre lots and i can hear when my neighbor runs his DW735 outside but it's not loud. If i go inside my house i can't hear a thing. Working inside with the door closed in an insulated shop will block almost all of the noise. My other neighbor works on cars, i know he's been running an angle grinder and i was standing 10 feet away from the garage and couldn't hear a thing.

I get worrying about noise but a lot less noise escapes our shops than we probably think. Loudest sound from a shop are probably a DW735 and the sequel from a dull band saw blade. Have someone run them for you and walk around to see ho would things are. You'll probably be surprised.

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First find out if there are any codes on sound. Here,  the county says keep the noise between 8am and 8 pm. Don't ask neighbors in advance. Fire up a few tools for a few minutes each or more. Do the planer last. Then ask what they think. My neighbor is much closer than you. They said the only thing they notice is the planer. They asked if I could use it after 8:30am.Tell the neighbors your intentions. Offer to add a little help with some mill work. Invite the to see finished projects. Be generous and considerate on property line issues. Bring them a nice cutting board. Make the neighbor an ally. If possible. Sometimes I get to a four handed need. All neighbors are willing if available.

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I hear they make electric dirt bikes that are supposed to be a lot of fun.

It's probably easier and cheaper to just make friends. If you want to insulate and drywall anyway, have at it. A double layer of drywall with greenglue will help dampen the noise a lot but with garage doors open not much will. Bring them a cutting board or a bench for their garden or something and you'll be fine.

I only recently got a planer but my my nextdoor neighbor at our townhouse says shes never heard any power tool noise. I'm in a finished basement and have run the tablesaw, bandsaw, sander, shop vac, etc. until 10-10:30 and night without any complaints. Give them your phone number and ask them to call or text if something is too loud. Don't go outside and power carve while riding your dirtbike if they're having a retirement party or be obnoxious.

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2 hours ago, legenddc said:

. Don't go outside and power carve while riding your dirtbike if they're having a retirement party or THEY WILL BE CELEBRATING YOUR FUNERAL  

FTFY. :D

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Problem neighbors would steer me off a place.  I moved to horse country so I would be left alone.  That said, I have never had a bad neighbor even in suburbia.  Dirt bikes, Harleys, 120db Rap music . . . they're all annoying.  It just so happens that WE do not find our routers and shop vacs to be a problem ;-)

I cased my current neighborhood several times at different phases of the day.  We have dirt bikes, chickens, horses, tractors, Harleys, and yes, woodworking tools.  My new shop is planned to be well insulated.  The DC will be in a an insulated lean-to off the back.  It will have less noise transfer than when I lived 20 feet from a neighbor so I don't expect any trouble.

I agree that you see what the local code is for noise.  I wouldn't mention a wood shop as that can run up a red flag for some locales.  We all want to be considerate of our neighbors but, we live here too.  My rule of thumb in suburbia was no earlier than 7am or whenever I heard the first yard machine.  If someone is running a yard blower, it's game on.  I also knocked off by 9pm.  If you plan, there is plenty to be done that doesn't make noise for outside your local noisy hours.

 

P.s. Oh darn, I just remembered back in the 70's.  A lady 4 acres away repeatedly called the cops because I was disturbing her chickens and they would lay well.  There's always one whack-job.  Hope your neighborhood is whack-job free.

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Lots of great info above. For the most part if you insulate, hang/tape drywall, and use insulated garage doors you will take care of most of the noise. My shop is about 40' from the house and other then a low din of the dust collector you don't hear much outside nothing inside. I would be surprised if my neighbors could hear anything, we are on 5 acres here. Now having said that if you want to get serious, carried away :),  look at my basement thread all of the soundproofing steps used in the theater would work for a shop as well things like double drywall/ green glue etc. 

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6 hours ago, gee-dub said:

....  It just so happens that WE do not find our routers and shop vacs to be a problem ;-)

Speak for yourself! :D

I avoid using my universal motor machines as much as possible, for my own personal sanity. There is no PPE in existance that renders a router pleasant to the ear!

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