deskjob

Large Chamfer on angled section of L shaped Desk

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Hello all!

I'm finishing up a large L-Shaped desk and I'd like to add a chamfer to the front edge of my desk.  It's a relatively large chamfer, 5/8" x 2", so using a hand router is not practical.  I think a circular saw would work pretty well, the chamfer angle is 15 degrees, and I can set the circular saw to that angle.  Where it gets tricky is the angled section of the front edge.  I can't really get at that area with the circular saw.  Any thoughts or ideas are appreciated!  Here is a screenshot of my project

 

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Ok the circ saw will work good for the straight parts the rest is hand work, I would draw the edges of the chamfer on the work piece, getting the majority of the material off staying away from the lines with a chisel I would fine tune the rest with a rasp and then finish up with a file and, sandpaper. Practice on some scrap to refine your technique good luck.

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Thanks for your reply Dave!  That's what I was afraid of (I'm under a time constraint), but was hoping there'd be some trick with a powertool I didn't know/think about.  Thankfully the section in question isn't terribly large, so it won't be that time consuming.  If you think of anything else, I'm all ears!  As it stands, I think the chisel route is going to turn out the best.

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I like the rasp idea for the bulk of the work and then switch to a spoke shave and hand chisel.  Take your time and watch the grain direction.

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I don't think I've ever seen a circular saw that could cut that bevel with the saw plate on the flat of the desk.  I guess you could clamp some blocking to the underside of the top and cut with the plate on that blocking to get the angle you're after, but even then, it would only work well for one wing of the desk or the other, because the saw won't tilt the right way for the other wing.

I think I'd go with a block plane for the bulk of the stock removal and finish with a rasp and/or chisel. @Ronn Wsuggests a spoke shave, which could be useful, too - I always seem to have a hard time getting a flat surface with one.  Bottom line is, I'm with @wtnhighlander- it'll be a lot faster to do the whole job with hand tools.

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Thanks for all the responses!  So general consensus - hand tools are the way to go!  @G Ragatz, I hadn't considered the circ saw plate only being able to rotate in one direction (doh!), so it looks like I'll be doing more than just that middle angled section by hand.  I've never done anything like this before, so I'm a little nervous - but I will certainly be practicing!  Now if only I didn't have this dang day job and could just be in the shop...

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I assume this was not part of the plan or you would have done it vertically on the tablesaw prior to assembly; clean up with a hand plane.  Post assembly?  I would reconsider.  There are some things where the balance of effort versus the result do not pan out well.  Since this sounds like an add-on idea I would just give it an 1/8" round over and move on.

If you absolutely have to have it . . . I use witness marks when rasping of planing profiles.

Kit-Hut-(31).jpg.631e52a3a8bfc48dc3fefc513545ce09.jpg

You might consider stopped chamfers to save the fussiness of the paring work at the inside corners.

57d1f69a4c754_MediaCabinet(150).jpg.2395545e47487b5469204fbaa5a2d2b3.jpg

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10 minutes ago, gee-dub said:

I assume this was not part of the plan or you would have done it vertically on the tablesaw prior to assembly; clean up with a hand plane.  Post assembly?  I would reconsider.  There are some things where the balance of effort versus the result do not pan out well.  Since this sounds like an add-on idea I would just give it an 1/8" round over and move on.

If you absolutely have to have it . . .

Sigh.  It was part of the design, I just didn't plan it out well.  First woodworking project I've taken on since woodshop days in high school.  I've got some stuff to learn!  In my head, a chamfer was a "finishing" feature, and I didn't consider the logistics of getting it done once the desk was assembled :/ 

So you are suggestion just a simple fillet to finish that edge out?  I'll have to think on this.

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51 minutes ago, Chet said:

How about a raised panel bit in your router? 15 Degree Raised Panel Bit

Then you would just need to sharpen the corners with a chisel.

I almost grabbed that very bit!  But, given the cost, and how likely I'd use it again... it just didn't make financial sense.  Thanks though!

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