Sting Ray Table Edge Profile?


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I have a client looking to have a sting ray edge profile on a round table top. Any tips on how to rout this? I'm guessing it is just a chamfer bit on the bottom and a round-over bit on the top, but I have to figure out how to rout both since once wont have any edge for the bearing the ride on. Haven't been able to find any information besides this picture. 

 

Thanks,

Sean

Round Black Walnut Table Top | Custom Made | Order Online

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TO do under bevels i use my track saw. I just test and make sure the track is spaced over the same distance every time. Setting a square to the amount the track needs to overhang is an easy way to make everything consistent. I'd do the round over first with a  bearing guided bit. Hand sand to feather everything out.

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1 hour ago, Chestnut said:

TO do under bevels i use my track saw. I just test and make sure the track is spaced over the same distance every time. Setting a square to the amount the track needs to overhang is an easy way to make everything consistent. I'd do the round over first with a  bearing guided bit. Hand sand to feather everything out.

Nut, that works well with straight cuts, but this case is a round table top.

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When I route a profile on a rounded edge I make up a throw-away fence with a matching profile to keep the material well controlled and give me the smoothest cut I can get.  This one has a concave curve and a couple of stop blocks since the hand grip profile is a stopped cut.  Yours would just be a pie-slice negative for as much of a circle as you see fit to offer control.

59959475a6daa_CBwithInlay(12).jpg.f7d6380061f699d89d505b4212287c36.jpg

 

58504aa6b37e3_CBwithInlay(16).jpg.2751b9871fd861ee6fdfac3d9212c95e.jpg

The fence will assure that you can only move away from the bit.  This makes it easy to start and stop doping the profile in sections that slightly overlap.  Another option is a circle jig either riding the table top or supporting it for the router table.  This one supports the work and uses a center pin to guide the material.

ap-Ped-Tbl-Top-circ-jig-rt.jpg.5825d218147ffdceb60c6149f80c4bf4.jpg

I would prefer this for a large chamfer more than a trammel type circle jig.

 

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If a large enough chamfer bit isn't handy, that part could also be done with a tablesaw or bandsaw. Tablesaw would be difficult to make the chamfer without coving it a bit, though.  Roundover the top edge first, then use a fence to guide the saw cut. Embedded sacrificial fence, or L-fence, in the TS case.

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