Knew Concepts Coping/Fret Saw


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I had a cheap hardware store coping saw and I enjoyed it. It recently broke so i bought a random cheap saw off of amazon and I hate the thing. I'm tempted to buy one of those Knew concept saws. Does any one have one of their saws and care to chime in with their opinion on it?

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2 hours ago, Chestnut said:

I had a cheap hardware store coping saw and I enjoyed it. It recently broke so i bought a random cheap saw off of amazon and I hate the thing. I'm tempted to buy one of those Knew concept saws. Does any one have one of their saws and care to chime in with their opinion on it?

Yes I have the fret saw and love it. I did change the handle to a bigger one for my hand but other than that it was great out of the box.  FWIW I also have a Rob Cosman fret saw for sale $20 :) 

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I have one, but after decades of using regular Coping, and Jeweler's saws, I can't get really excited about it.    I can't say that I do any better work with it, or that it makes it easier to do good work.  If it could keep the blade that tight, without all the extra size of the frame, I'd like it a lot better.

I ordered one off of Amazon, and it didn't have the rotating feature.  I hadn't looked closely, but I don't think I've ever used one with the blade straight in line with the frame, so I sent that one back.  One showed up on another woodworking forums Classified section, so I bought that one.  I could have easily done without it.

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I figured out the problem with the saw i got off of amazon. The frame really isn't stiff enough to tension the blade. When trying to make a cut the blade keep buckling and binding.

I know it's not necessary but having the quick release feature is appealing. There have been a few times i've wanted to cut inside shapes out but found another way because it was too much of a pain to remove the blade.

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I have the coping saw. After years of not enough tension in the thin back saws, the KC saw.is a revelation. The back is a bit heavier and does take a bit of getting used to, but.much nicer. I am going to get the feet saw when I have the spare cash.

You do need to check their website first to make sure you get the version you need. There is a mark III and a mark IV. Swiveling is one of the major differences. 

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1 hour ago, wtnhighlander said:

Never having handled the Knew Concepts saw, can someone please explain its advantage over a standard coping saw? I see the frame structure should be stiffer, but I've always used coping saws in a pull-cut setup, so it really shouldn't matter. Should it?

Here is a link to my original review, with history: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ToolReviews/KnewConceptsFretsaw.html

Briefly, I helped develop this fretsaw for woodworkers, and have experience with all the variations since day dot.

Regards from Perth

Derek

 

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Has anyone tried the twisted-blade technique with a coping saw? I can't recall if it was Paul Sellers or Roy Underhill, but one of them has a video demonstrating this. The blade was 'kinked' to form a permanent twist in the middle, so the front half cut downward. At the corner, the stroke was forced through the kink to the rear half, which cut sideways, no rotation of the saw needed. I believe the saw was set to cut on the push stroke. I am not sure how durable the blade would be in this arrangement.

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I'm not sure about that, but i was curious about the spiral blades that Lee Valley sells that will cut in any direction. I wasn't sure if those were something that worked well or not. I opted to just buy some regular blades. I did end up buying a knewconcepts saw.

I figured out what was causing my unhappiness with the coping saw i bought. The blade in the picture below is offset from the center line of the handle ( i flipped it around so the blade is oriented properly) but the offset caused binding issues and i was never able to cut well with it. When i grabbed the frame and handle and hand my hand in line with the blade more the cuts went smoothly.

1115201025-01.jpeg

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I've never seen one like that either.  Mine tighten the blade by turning the handle.  I found some coping saw blades I liked decades ago, so stocked up then, and still have some.  They came in a little paper envelope, but there is no name brand anywhere.  I'll try to remember to take a picture tomorrow.

I always cut on the push stroke, because it leaves the finished corner clean, and I have a better feel for saws that cut on the push stroke anyway.

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6 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

Has anyone tried the twisted-blade technique with a coping saw? I can't recall if it was Paul Sellers or Roy Underhill, but one of them has a video demonstrating this. The blade was 'kinked' to form a permanent twist in the middle, so the front half cut downward. At the corner, the stroke was forced through the kink to the rear half, which cut sideways, no rotation of the saw needed. I believe the saw was set to cut on the push stroke. I am not sure how durable the blade would be in this arrangement.

It was not PS or RU, but Frank Klausz, and not a coping saw but a bowsaw. Otherwise you got it right :)

Regards from Perth

Derek

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1 hour ago, derekcohen said:

It was not PS or RU, but Frank Klausz, and not a coping saw but a bowsaw. Otherwise you got it right :)

Regards from Perth

Derek

I recall seeing Klausz with the bowsaw (turning saw?), but for some reason the coping saw sticks in my mind. 

Anyway, anyone ever tried it?

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I tried bending a blade on a brake, but my brake wouldn't give a tight enough bend to make one that would make a good transition.  I just tried it with a tree work bow saw blade, but never put any more effort into getting it done.  I didn't have anything else I wanted to risk sacrificing for the trial.  I was expecting the blade to break, but it didn't.   I didn't really have much of a use for one-just wanted to try it.  That was so long ago that I don't even remember when it was.

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19 hours ago, Chestnut said:

I'm not sure about that, but i was curious about the spiral blades that Lee Valley sells that will cut in any direction. I wasn't sure if those were something that worked well or not. I opted to just buy some regular blades. I did end up buying a knewconcepts saw.

I have those blades. They're intended for modelers and they work OK on balsa wood. I did cut some 3/4" dovetails with those but they have the tendency to wander a lot and they are slow (they will break easily).

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