The "Lunch After Thanksgiving" Desk


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3 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

@Chet, what product was that? GF isn't commonly available around here, I might need to investigate Benjamin Moore.

This is the primer and paint I used from Benjamin Moore.  It also comes in quarts.  You can spray, brush or roll it.  I was going to spray it but ended up rolling it for a few different reasons but I was extremely happy with how it rolled on.  I used a real short nap mohair roller I picked up in the B.M. store.  I brushed in the tight corners and rolled everything else.   The primer is one of the nicest ones I have used.  The broacher for the Cabinet Coat has a fair number of colors but they can mix it in almost all the colors they have in the color inventory.

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Photo-dump ahead! Catching up on several short work sessions. The drawers needed a central divider to support the slides, so I added on, using a sliding dovetail for strength. Clamps, scraps

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Thanks, Chet! We have PPG and SW stores, but the only source for Benjamin Moore is an interior decorator in town. I'll see if they carry those products.

Meanwhile, I found another local place that carries some GF products, so I picked up some milk paint and HP topcoat to test. 

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Good idea about using the fence. I have made several projects using the same style trim including the pieces that will hold the glass in my door. In doing so, I would cut a right and left piece from off cuts as guides. As my cuts are probably not as accurate as yours, I cut them a tad long and sneak up on them by putting the edge very snug against the stopped blade and hold them in that position which will take just a sliver off with each cut. I always make extra stock as every once in a while, the long side will become a short side. :huh:

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12 hours ago, Coop said:

sneak up on them by putting the edge very snug against the stopped blade and hold them in that position which will take just a sliver off with each cut. 

 

12 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

I do the same for the final fit, butting the cut against the saw plate and pulling the sled back across the teeth to remove very fine amounts.

I'm not following this.  Is the motor on or are you turning the blade by hand? 

Are you butting the work piece against the center of the blade, then pulling it backward into the bottoms of the teeth?

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@Mark J, I can't speak for Ken, but my method is to raise the blade so that the carbide is completely above the work piece. With the blade spinning and the work retracted a bit, advance the miter sled so that the work aligns to the middle of the saw blade. Push the work into the side of the saw plate, hold it firmly in place against the sled fence, the draw the sled backward so that the work brushes the sides of the teeth. The angles involved allow the carbide teeth to push the work away from the blade, so that only the slightest bit of material is removed. Powered version of a miter shooting (chuting?) board.

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I do a similar process but with an added step. I push the piece against the stopped blade. If i need to remove 2 hairs i put a bit of force on the pieces to deflect the blade a hair. Then i retract the piece start the blade and make the cut. I do this on the miter saw as well as the table saw.

I think Ross's idea above is the same thing just with out my added step.

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Working on the paint today. I used some Antique White that didn't meet the client's approval, as a base coat, to see how well it covered. This stuff goes a lot farther than I expected.

This illustrates why rushing is a bad idea. This was the last joint glued in, and I didn't take great pains to remove all signs of squeeze-out, since paint would cover it. However, the glue, which appeared dry, still shrank a bit after the paint dried, leaving a crackly finish to scrape off.

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To that end, let me recommend this as a highly useful addition to anyone's collection:

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The folding handle keeps it handy in a pocket, the steel holds an edge surprisingly well, and the structure is sturdy enough to take a bit if pounding, when needed. Great for scraping glue or paring away the odd sliver. I only wish it was narrower, as 1" doesn't fit into a lot of places.

FYI, the actual color coat chosen is Gulfstream Blue. Photos pending ...

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I remember Steve (wdwerker) talking numerous times about the process involved when painting a project versus just finishing.  Every little flaw or crack or seam gets magnified by the paint process, it just really stands out as apposed to say using a finish like ARS.

His words were ringing in my ears when I was doing my kitchen.  You sand and prime and sand and prime, once that looks good you can feel safe putting you paint on.

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Steve was not wrong. 

Anyway, the GF Milk Paint levels nicely, and dries fast. Makes up for a lot of my poor technique. I got 3 coats on, and dry enough to lay down some High Performance. With a little help.

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With the space heater cranked up in my tiny shop, the clear is fully dry to the touch already. Instructions say to wait 2 hours between coats, but I think one is going to be enough. Expect an in-situ photo by noon tomorrow!

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The wood on the drill bit tip is a good one. I've used blue tape and sharpie as well to give a depth indication.

I really like how this project turned out. The painted color looks great. I assume you want to spray because there is a slight brush texture to the surface and you want it to be smooth?

The trim on the drawer fronts and bottom edge really set the piece off. Did you cover how you made the trim pieces in the journal? If you did i must have missed them and should go back.

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