Attaching new clamp handles question


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So I broke a couple of my Jet clamp handles off a couple years ago, ordered some replacements about a year ago, and this week while working through several shop projects stumbled across them.

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My question is this. After drilling out the rivets how would you guys fix these. My assumption is a small bolt and nut but wondered if anyone had a better solution for me?

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If you can find brass rod of appropriate diameter, it will be easier to peen, and plenty strong in that application. If you have something to use as an anvil, like a block of steel, use a twist drill to make a small depression in it. When peening the rod into a rivet, using the depression in the anvil to "catch" the end opposite the hammer will help retain the domed form.

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21 minutes ago, wtnhighlander said:

If you can find brass rod of appropriate diameter, it will be easier to peen, and plenty strong in that application. If you have something to use as an anvil, like a block of steel, use a twist drill to make a small depression in it. When peening the rod into a rivet, using the depression in the anvil to "catch" the end opposite the hammer will help retain the domed form.

The head of a second hammer will work well as a bucking bar to pean the other end.

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It takes something besides a regular pop rivet gun to pop stainless rivets.  I wouldn't expect anything else to hold, and even the stainless ones will loosen with this type of use.  I doubt you can find the right kind of rivet at an average hardware store, but probably can on ebay.

It seems like they would provide the proper rivets with the replacement handles.

edited to add:  just did a search for "steel solid rivets" on ebay, and everything you could want is there.  Just need to know the length, and diameter.  The two hammer method should work fine.

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33 minutes ago, curlyoak said:

I never knew the term bucking bar but I get it. And I like it too.

My Air Force sheet metal background coming out, sorry..  

Just a heavy steel surface used on the back side of a solid rivet to form the "mushroom" head of the rivet.  Heavy because it helps eliminate bounce.

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On fancy gutter systems, I use aircraft rivets, which require a pneumatic rivet gun (short stroke air hammer), and a bucking bar to back the rivet up.  "Bucking Bar" is the correct term.  I already had those tools, since I was starting to build an airplane when I met the girl who became my Wife.  The only time she'd been up in an airplane, it crashed, so that ended the airplane business.

https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200451722_200451722?cm_mmc=Google-pla&utm_source=Google_PLA&utm_medium=Air Tools %2B Compressors > Air Tools %2B Accessories > Air Punch %2B Rivet Tools&utm_campaign=Air Capital&utm_content=301110&&ds_e_ad_type=pla&gclid=CjwKCAiA57D_BRAZEiwAZcfCxZNyegXzIiac0aYH7gCYasWgHAe0rQKrArI7v2Cxel8btlb6MtuZeBoCOlIQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

https://aircraft-tool.com/shop/search.aspx?CATEGORY=RIVET+GUNS&AspxAutoDetectCookieSupport=1

 

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