88 mortises cut in about 10 hours.


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No problem Coop. I probably should have covered that in my post. The piece to receive the mortise is clamped under the top table using the Matchfit clamps in the clamping pad in view in the first photo. The picture is not that great, but the Matchfit pad is the piece with the dovetail grooves in a grid pattern. This allows clamping both vertical or horizontal pieces such as table legs or aprons etc. Hope that is a bit more clear.

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1 hour ago, wtnhighlander said:

Thanks for posting this. Along with another router mortising jig I recently saw in another member's post, I know understand the use case well enough to attempt some floating tenons in my next project.

Floating tenons are really pretty cool. I used them in my door build. As I don’t have the larger Domino, it saved me from having to cut the attached tenons on the rails. My jig for the mortises, unfortunately wasn’t as nice as OP’s but required very, very  minimal sanding. And it’s pretty cool too, making your own tenons. 

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23 minutes ago, Coop said:

Floating tenons are really pretty cool. I used them in my door build. As I don’t have the larger Domino, it saved me from having to cut the attached tenons on the rails. My jig for the mortises, unfortunately wasn’t as nice as OP’s but required very, very  minimal sanding. And it’s pretty cool too, making your own tenons. 

I have made a batch of tenon stock in standard widths and planed down to standard thicknesses. I then round the edges using the router table. I usually make it in lengths of about 2 feet and then I just cut off whatever length I need on the bandsaw.

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I kind of see your point but with tenons this small and the fact that that they are not exposed to the relative humidity,  but encompassed inside a much larger piece, and the fact that I used epoxy, I doubt there will ever be a concern. 

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Nice job on the jig and the description. I built one of Morley's mortisers a couple of years back. I wound up modifying it because of the loss of depth that results from the bit going through the top piece before it ever contacts the workpiece. You lose ¾" right off the bat. I kept the Morley base design and added ideas from a Fine Woodworking video and Derek Cohen that uses a runner in a slot and the micro-adjust fence for my router.

Here's a quick video of a couple of my students using it. In this one Aviva is using it to cut a keyhole slot.

 

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2 minutes ago, wtnhighlander said:

@Mick S, was that drilling operation to make a starter hole for the router bit, or something else that I couldn't see?

Yes, because she was using a keyhole bit. They don't bore very well even though technically they can. With keyhole bits, I usually drill out the starter hole and use a ⅛" endmill to clear the slot before switching to the keyhole bit. I've broken a few before going to that method.

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