Removing rust from jointer infeed outfeed tables


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So we had some sever weather here yesterday with really high humidity. My jointer was fine yesterday but now has a coating of rust on the fence and infeed and outfeed tables. What's the best way to remove this without affecting the flatness/surface of the tables and fence? I have been using paste wax on top of it. Is there something else I should be using?

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I would try 0000 steel wool and some WD40 and if that works re-coat with a good paste wax. If that doesn’t work I would try some very fine wet-dry Emory paper with WD, I’m sure others will chime in with better ideas

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24 minutes ago, Woodenskye said:

You could soak paper towels on evaporust and let it sit and wipe off.  After basically 1 day shouldn’t take much.

Isn’t evaporust powerful stuff? I’ve never used it but I have heard it’s used to freshen up the points on wood files, just seeking knowledge as usual

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Evaporust IS Powerful at rust removal but does not remove good metal.   (It is not instant.  Have to give it time.) The thing with Evaporust is it works best when the item in dunked in a container filled with Evaporust.  The directions says it works on large surfaces if you cover the surface with a paper towel the saturate the paper towel with the Evap-o-Rust.  I have not had any luck with that method.  I usually only use Evap-o-Rust on smaller items....like will fit into a quart pan.  The stuff is expensive - several hundred for a 50 gal drum.  For larger items I have a 350 gal plastic animal water trough filled with water and some Washing Soda (not Baking Soda).  Electrolysis works GREAT.  Hope this helps

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I think you would be fine with WD40 or mineral spirits.  I use mineral spirits and a green scotchbrite pad which is a little courser then four ott steel wool but it still won't harm the good steel under your rust.  Then wipe it down real good let it dry some and then paste wax.  You might have just been past the wear date of your last waxing.

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I think you were right, Chet. This was an extremely dynamic weather shift for us here in Arkansas in the last 48 hours. All that after our snow storm. The rust was dense but not thick thankfully. WD40 and a rag got it off and I put another paste wax layer on it.

 

Thanks

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11 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

I'm going to offer a very contrarian suggestion, just wax over it. Use a scotchbrite pad to remove any scale, but leave the fine patina, then wax it. This technique forms a protective layer that inhibits further rust quite well. Doing so purposefully, as with a vinegar / salt wash, is one way firearms were once treated to prevent rusting.

I'm going to try that out on something for sure.

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15 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

I'm going to offer a very contrarian suggestion, just wax over it. Use a scotchbrite pad to remove any scale, but leave the fine patina, then wax it. This technique forms a protective layer that inhibits further rust quite well. Doing so purposefully, as with a vinegar / salt wash, is one way firearms were once treated to prevent rusting.

+1 i was going to recommend scotchbrite.

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I'm a newbie to woodworking at 74 and just bought a Ridgid TS2424 contractors table saw. I had some rust and a lot of black coating on the table and extension arms.

I lubricated the gears and then I used WD-40 and a combination of gray pad, 150 grit, 220 grit, and 600 grit followed by wiping down with Naptha to clean it up. I spent hours on it but it still has a fair amount of black stains that i will attribute to character.

The surface feels smooth and I applied two coats of Johnson's paste wax.

Did I do it correctly and do I have to worry about the dark stains? I have yet to cut anything.

Thank you

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7 hours ago, MrMayor said:

Me too! I earned every one of these gray hairs. I do plan on cutting something tomorrow. I want to get a dado stack. Do you recommend a 6 or 8 inch stack? Any particular brand?

Benefit of the 8" is deeper cuts and higher tooth speed relative to the cut. The drawback is that it requires a slower feed rate in a 1.5 hp saw. The cut depth is not needed for the majority of dado work, but is handy on occasion. I run an Irwin 8" stack on my saw. Note that the arbor is not long enough to hokd the entire stack + shim set, unless you leave off the cup washer. I'd rather take 2 passes.

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I have a 1.5 hp saw and use an 8" stack with out any issues with power. I'd go that route over a 6" as i have used the extra cut depth a couple times.

It also allows you to use the dado stack with a  cross cut sled if you ever find the need.

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Thanks for the info, guys. I am thinking of a Freud 8" stack for my saw. I'll ask for it as a birthday gift. Thoughts?

Also, I need a dado throat plate for my Ridgid 2424 saw, but the parts are obsolete. I will call Ridgid tomorrow for their input

.

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