Record Cabinet


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2 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

That's cool, Brad! I jave one of those calipers, but can't seem to keep batteries in it. Does yours drain them quickly?

I had the same issue and ended up going back to a non battery version

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On 5/14/2021 at 6:44 PM, wtnhighlander said:

That's cool, Brad! I jave one of those calipers, but can't seem to keep batteries in it. Does yours drain them quickly?

Yeah mine does drain the batteries quick. I think it is because on these types if you move the caliper at all it turns on. Maybe it wouldn't be such an issue if it only turned on or off with the button. I usually just keep a bunch of batteries laying around. I usually have to change them about every 3-4 months. 

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18 hours ago, gee-dub said:

In contrast I tried an iGaging tilt box and the thing ate a battery a week

Thats interesting, I have one that is 17 months old and still works on the factory battery. (I did run out to the shop and check before posting this.) ;)

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I have a Mitutoyo and have had the same battery in it for the last 6 years. I have seen online reviews that the more budget calipers use electronics that have very high current draws even 10 fold that of the Mitutoyo even off, which results in the battery dying quickly even when not used. Knockoffs are highly prevalent in this field as well and the knockoff tools have poor performance.

Though at the price difference you can buy a LOT of batteries... and woodworkign doesn't really need any additional precision that may or may not be offered.

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49 minutes ago, bradpotts said:

I can see where this can come in handy though. If you needed to put veneer on something that you were unable to put into a vacuum bag or clamps, this would be the way to go. All in all, a great skill to have learned but it has a special place in the veneering world. 

The technique seems awfully similar to hammer veneering but with the drawbacks of not getting to adjust much. Have you thought about trying hammer veneering in situations like you outlined above? There is also the PVA iron on method that seems interesting and could have some promise in situations where possible edge peeling is limited.

For those that aren't familiar the PVA iron on method is as follows. Coat both the veneer back and substrate with pva glue 2-3 layers and let it dry. Shortly after it dries position the veneer and use a warm-hot iron to reactivate the glue and attach the veneer to the substrate.

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