A question about Classic Woodworking


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I don't think this is an error on my part, but it seem they're inverting the video periodically when showing bandsaw use. Either that or the guy has a left-handed bandsaw. Anyone else notice this?

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Is that the show with Tom McLaughlin?  He has a small green bandsaw that feeds the opposite of any other bandsaw I've seen.  Not sure what the brand is.  He has a larger saw that he uses for resawing that feeds the "normal" way.

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That's a 10" Inca bandsaw. It is reversed. I have the 20" Inca and a 20" SCM bandsaw. The Inca is so much more comfortable to use for a right handed person because you're feeding/guiding with your right hand rather than with your left as on most bandsaws.

 

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9 hours ago, collinb said:

I don't think this is an error on my part, but it seem they're inverting the video periodically when showing bandsaw use. Either that or the guy has a left-handed bandsaw. Anyone else notice this?

I know this may not be the answer. But, bandsaws that are used in the butchering business feed from the opposite side that a woodworking bandsaw feeds from. And the blades are ordered from meat cutting mfg's.

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I went back and looked at the video Collin was referring to. It's clearly an Inca - made after they sold the company and moved the manufacturing from Switzerland to France. You can tell by the turquoise color of the cover panel. The Swiss made were green with a light gray/tan cover.

They're no longer in business, but have something of a cult following, especially for their bandsaws. I wouldn't trade mine for anything. 

People look at me like I'm crazy when I tell this, but it's true. The Inca 20" bandsaw came standard with 8" of resaw capacity. They sold a riser block kit that raised it to 10". When I was a dealer for them we used to do a demo using a 1/16" blade, taking an 8/4 x 9 ¾" x 6" or so block of mahogany, stand it on end, start cutting like you would if you were resawing, go in about an inch, turn right 90 degrees, go and inch, turn another right 90 degrees, and zig-zig like that through the width of the piece until we came out the other edge. Blow the dust out and the two pieces would slip apart both directions.

 

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14 hours ago, Coop said:

Wonder why? @Chet, feel like chiming in? 

I would be guessing, but when I was in my apprenticeship classes, on occasion we watched films form the good ol' days of work in the processing plants and the way the lines came up to the guys on the saws.  The line was on their left and it would have been hard to get the carcuss from the rail to the saw if the saw had been set up the way woodworks are used to.

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