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I think in the past I had seen something on this topic, but I could not find the information. I know cherry can change colors and I have seen this happen when milled boards were stacked in my garage. Even when it is not in direct light, parts of a board that are shaded from the light will turn a different color than the rest of the board. Is this a surface change or does it go deeper into the wood?  What I wanted to understand was how much of an issue is this change and if it happens during the building process can the difference be removed during final sanding?  Also if the cherry is finished with a teak oil does this stop the process or will it continue to change color over time?  

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Cherry will change over time regardless of finish. Some finishes May hasten or slow the process, but that is all. The length of time your boards sit around will determine how deep that change gets. In a normal workflow, yes sanding will even things out. But, there will be some natural variation in the fresh portions anyway. 

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27 minutes ago, Woodworking_Hobby said:

I think in the past I had seen something on this topic, but I could not find the information. I know cherry can change colors and I have seen this happen when milled boards were stacked in my garage. Even when it is not in direct light, parts of a board that are shaded from the light will turn a different color than the rest of the board. Is this a surface change or does it go deeper into the wood?  What I wanted to understand was how much of an issue is this change and if it happens during the building process can the difference be removed during final sanding?  Also if the cherry is finished with a teak oil does this stop the process or will it continue to change color over time?  

Tpt is correct, it will change a lot over time regardless of finish.

Some It's best to do a light sanding just before finish to even things out as best you can and then apply your finish..  Some people will even set their projects out in the sun before finish to quicken that darkening process.

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Best thing w/ cherry is keep the boards out of sunlight, build what you're gonna build, and then let it go back into sunlight or at least indirect sunlight. Cherry darkens to a very rich attractive color over time.

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As others have correctly said, cherry definitely darkens over time. Walnut lightens. Mesquite darkens ate the same rate as cherry. Don't ask me how I know.

If you want the freshly surfaced color of cherry without the darkening, consider using alder as an alternative. It does not darken, but may get a little lighter.

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2 hours ago, treeslayer said:

Cherry kids folding chairs, the dark one was made in 2017, lighter was done today, Watco oil is the finish, all are right it just gets darker with time and better I think 3898D077-B8E6-47F1-AC4E-00E35AB35B9D.jpeg.12ffd55004172e4bcd4fc3fb494215b6.jpeg4AF509D5-D889-451A-8154-699FC0C050BF.jpeg.7ddb7645ab5aa708d1edcb534f226ae9.jpeg

Love those chairs!

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Sap wood will not darken like the heart wood, it will stay very pale.  Also, some will go reddish brown, others more chocolate brown.  I made a nightstand, which have both on the top, over time the difference became very visible.  Maple, red oak in this manner are easier to match. I have not work much with walnut.   I found color matching cherry very challenging, especially as it ages it does not darken all the same way. Trying to keep it looking like it was freshly milled, I do no think it is a battle you can win...just like wood movement. It takes a few months/years to stabilize in color.

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I have once or twice used Watco's Cherry Danish Oil to balance the colors.  It won't darken sap wood much, but will even out the darker wood, and shorten the darkening time.

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This won't blend the variation from different trees, but a lye treatment will turn cherry from fresh cut salmon pink to deep brick red in seconds. Over a few weeks, the red mellows to the dark reddish-brown typical of aged cherry. If I were trying to blend mis-matched shades, I might use the lye first, then follow it with the danish oil @RichardA mentioned.

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