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OK I'm newbie to this forum and have a question about the Leigh Supper 12" and as you can see in the picture it seems that the angles are different. I am using 1/2" thick wood and bit

# 120-8. The jig is setup on the pin side then fliped over to tail side to rout. can someone helpwith this?

 

 

 

 

 

 

#  Dovetail.thumb.jpg.d6dfcfbb91bac900f16c395a393965db.jpg

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I have the D4R jig and it takes a lot to get the joint correct.   I don't think the angles on different I think the joint is to loose.  Have you watched Leigh's videos?  They are helpful.  This one is on through dovetails.  Leigh super jig.  It looks like you are using pine for your test cuts.  I would switch to a hard wood like poplar for your tests.  Pine will not give great results even when everything else is perfect.

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It's all in the height of the bit from the router base.  There is zero margin for error.  I keep two dedicated routers, that never get changed.  That would not be necessary with a digital height gauge, but I already had a couple of extra routers, and don't like to spend time fiddling with setups.  I can just pull that toolbox out, adjust the pin spacing as I want, and perfect every time.  It took a while to get them dialed in though.

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I disagree i do not think you have the right bit or the right bit angles. I don't know anything about that jig but the tails angle does not match the pin angle. They look snug at the top of the picture and have huge gaps at the bottom.

The bit you linked is 14 degrees, most DT angles I see are 7 degrees. I suggest checking the manual for the right bits the right angles etc.

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Looking at it closer, there are a number of things NQR.  There is absolutely no margin for error.  Boards flat, and ends need to be registered in the jig just right too.  I agree that it looks like the wrong angle dovetail bit.  Watch that blowout on the edges of the tail board.   Every step needs to be meticulous.

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Are we REALLY sure that routers and jigs are easier than a back saw  and chisel?

<ducking and running>

:D

I wish I could offer some insight here, but the only dovetails I've ever cut were by hand. After a couple of times, I realized none of the recipients of the pieces I was making could care less about the existence of dovetails, so I moved on to simpler methods...

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Completely agree with @Tom Kingi love my Leigh but the settings must be right, watch the videos several times, boards correctly milled for thickness and square, record your settings when you get one right and keep your test piece for reference when you get on to it it’s a great tool IMO, I use mine for all kinds of joinery

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1 hour ago, wtnhighlander said:

Are we REALLY sure that routers and jigs are easier than a back saw  and chisel?

<ducking and running>

Probably not, but arthritis prevents me from using a handsaw for any extended time.  So it is, what it is.

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12 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

Are we REALLY sure that routers and jigs are easier than a back saw  and chisel?

For 1 -5 drawer I'll use the saw and chisel. For > 5 drawers the router is coming out. I have the Porter Cable 4200 jig and it seems a lot easier than the Leigh jig but may not be as flexible. I set up my PC jig last night in about an hour. Then most of the fiddling is making sure all the parts are consistent in thickness and width.

10 hours ago, Just Bob said:

Probably not, but arthritis prevents me from using a handsaw for any extended time.  So it is, what it is.

Have you tried the band saw method? Gets the look and feel of hand cut but doesn't require endless hours of saw use.

 

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5 hours ago, Chestnut said:

Have you tried the band saw method? Gets the look and feel of hand cut but doesn't require endless hours of saw use.

Yes, years ago when I first started having trouble.  

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On 4/12/2021 at 8:21 AM, Tom King said:

It's all in the height of the bit from the router base.  There is zero margin for error.  I keep two dedicated routers, that never get changed.  That would not be necessary with a digital height gauge, but I already had a couple of extra routers, and don't like to spend time fiddling with setups.  I can just pull that toolbox out, adjust the pin spacing as I want, and perfect every time.  It took a while to get them dialed in though.

This is exactly the situation. Add to this Leigh's adjustable collar, one on each router, and you can fine-tune the operation to perfection.

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On 4/12/2021 at 5:24 PM, wtnhighlander said:

Are we REALLY sure that routers and jigs are easier than a back saw  and chisel?

<ducking and running>

:D

I wish I could offer some insight here, but the only dovetails I've ever cut were by hand. After a couple of times, I realized none of the recipients of the pieces I was making could care less about the existence of dovetails, so I moved on to simpler methods...

I too only use dovetails on request.  Someone, somewhere promoted the idea that through dovetails indicate quality craftsmanship. So much so that machines now crank them out for kitchen like crazy.  I am not belittling the skill, just the requirement ;-)

There are a lot of nice looking joints, dovetails included.  I just find dovetails fussy BUT, that is probably due in LARGE portion to the fact that after all of them I have done I am still not very good at them :(

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