Memento Display Shelf


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A brief stint in the shop this morning allowed me to rip a straight edge on several boards that will be broken down into leg components for the bench.20210901_051152.thumb.jpg.f6b9990b5bf827249ebe17ec8150690c.jpg

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My straight ripping sled design is flexible, using the fence as a guide, rather than the miter slot. But for wider boards, I need a matching support platform next to the blade to prevent sagging. For the unititated, that sagging can lead to off-square cuts and dangerous kick-back.

A friend of mine needed 14 stitches to repair the tooth marks that his saw blade left across his fingers this weekend. Kick-back is no joke, use your devices safely!

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The next step for the legs is to bevel all these sticks, so that together, they can form 4 hollow tubes...20210902_052757.thumb.jpg.f40fa2b9ecb2f252407af90a88f98e08.jpg

I do this at the table saw, setting the fence so that the blade cuts maybe 1/32 below the top face. Make one pass, flip it around, and make the second pass with the first bevel's edge against the fence, and the narrow face down. A push stick is critical to hold down directly over the center of the board. As it is, a face this narrow will rock easily, so a steady hand is key.

The slight square edge at the bevel's point rides better against the fence, that a sharp point would. Also leaves a little material to remove for adjusting the fit. And if no planing is needed, the corner is going to be rounded off, anyway. A sharp point is ... pointless.

Oh, a safety tip for the lurkers just getting into the craft. Never, never, NEVER make bevel cuts like this with the blade tilted toward the fence. The trapped off-cut is virtually guaranteed to rip you a new belly-button.

There are some advanced techniques, involving contraptions attached to the fence to provide clearance for the waste piece, but don't attempt them until you fully understand the risks involved.

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I don't think so, Mark. At just 3" of width, there isn't much expansion, eventhough this is flat-sawn material. If it were going outdoors, possibly. A study from Purdue in 2016, using white oak flooring, measured a maximum expansion of 4" planks at 0.064", with a moisture content change from 7% to 14%. But that was material acclimated to a controlled environment, then left outdoors, under cover, for weeks, to reach that change.

I suppose I could use a little glue on just one side of the filler, to allow some wiggle room.

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Another brief stint in the shop this morning gave me time to ponder on some decorative elements. This bench design is more like a seat-height table. There will be aprons to join the tops of the legs, and the aprons will have a shaped face, like a molding. But the legs themselves are very plain and square at this point. 

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I thought of several features I've seen used in mission or G&G styles, but finally decided on a corner bead detail, mostly because it will be straightforward to make with my tooling. But before making the bead, I need to lay out length and joinery. Blue tape sure makes it easy to see the marks!

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Out of time again, you'll have to wait for the next installment to find out what all those markings mean!

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I think some people especially folks new to the hobby believe that more glue makes a stronger joint, it just takes time to figure out how much to use, I’m with @Chet clean up is much easier, and I don’t want to start a debate but I have heard/read that it’s almost impossible to starve a glue joint with regular clamps 

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On 9/10/2021 at 5:52 AM, wtnhighlander said:

Another brief stint in the shop this morning gave me time to ponder on some decorative elements. This bench design is more like a seat-height table. There will be aprons to join the tops of the legs, and the aprons will have a shaped face, like a molding. But the legs themselves are very plain and square at this point. 

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That’s about as good as it gets! Very well done Ross! 

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So, I finalized my layout on the 'master' leg blank, and used it to set up my cuts. If you haven't noticed, I tend to lean heavily on my tablesaw for most machining operations. Unless the task can only be accomplished by router or other means, I am just more comfortable handling it at my TS.

Using the blue tape layout lines as a visual guide, I line the master blank up and set the stop on my sled.

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Then I make the same cut on all four legs, bringing them to uniform length.

The next cut is to make a groove, which will later accept a beaded insert. Same process, repeated 4 times. Used a gauge bar to set blade to 1/4" above the sled floor.

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The groove takes a couple of passes with my crosscut blade, to reach the desired width.

Next is to switch ends, and mill a wider groove near the opposite end. Still 1/4" deep, still square, so I use the same process, first aligning one edge of the groove and setting tbe stop, and cutting all 4 legs. Repeat for the opposite edge, and nibble out the center. A dado stack may have cut faster, but would have required resetting to the different blade dimensions. Any time I can retain the same setup, I prefer to do that, for consistency.

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Almost done with the legs, anyone guessed what all these cuts are for?

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Does every tablesaw have this little plug in front of the blade? Handy to mark the blade width, so both sides of the cut can be aligned before engaging the teeth.

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Next operation on the legs is to cut a bevel of about 30 degrees on the bottom end.

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With the saw unplugged, I rotate the teeth backwads until the edge closest to the cut just kisses the edge of the tape.

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Now use the fence and a stop block to lock in the distance from the cut point.

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I bought this saw off CL, and the miter gauge was missing. Never replaced it, because a sled takes care of most tasks. But gauging from the right side doesn't work with my sled, so I made a simple, fixed miter gauge for this.

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On to the next task...

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