Cabinet Doors Oak frame Maple panel


JFII
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Suggestions  for steps to finish kitchen cabinet doors using oak as the frame and Maple as the panel.

The stiles and rails are all cut (mitered) and with dado for panel and biscuit slots have been cut. They have been dry fitted

I will be using neutral stain with some pecan mixed in.

The maple panels are all cut and have been finished with 8 coats of satin clear lacquer (from a spray can) and look great.

I did a test and stained a couple of the frames and glued and assembled with the panels I did get some swell around joints which was correctable  but may not have been if they were also poly'd

My main concern is the build up of poly around or possible mistakes (sanding, bleed or seepage) to the panels if I glue up first.

I think this is my only choice or to find somewhere that can spray them for me but this an buying a couple of cases of spray don't seem financially viable or practical.

Hints, tips, tricks, sound advise or good jokes welcome

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  • JFII changed the title to Cabinet Doors Oak frame Maple panel
  • 4 weeks later...

I used many coat of lacquer on the panels is that considered a seal coat or is there more i should do? I am trying to keep the panels as light (white) as possible. The maple had some nice "features" I don't know the reflective nature of some woods like maple is called but i was able to get a sheet with some of it and another with a bit less . Lacquer I learned (the hard way) was the only way to keep the maple from darkening. I brushed on the first coats of lacquer to build it up sanded it out then sprayed the rest. Besides the idea of waxing the oak stiles and rails was also considering using Tung oil or a mixture / thinned version of it (maybe with linseed IDK). I am experimenting on couple of shelves  before I commit.  I think I am just tired of smelling poly and want to try and learn some other ways to finish till someone writes no no don't do that. All comments are welcome and help me learn.

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I was considering wax. I will look into Osmo you suggested. I have presses forward with Tung Oil. It has no effect on the lacquered panels as long as wipe it off quickly and buffing blends it right away. This save me the time of taping all the panels. I will probable wax when i am done to seal of the Tung which i don't seem to mind. I look into the wax Mark J suggested or use a good carnauba - i like the way it smells.

I like this thanks Mike J

Polyx-Oils are made of natural oils (sunflower, soybean and thistle) and waxes (carnauba and candelilla) plus a bit of low-odor, benzene-free solvent. Once dry, the clear satin finish is food safe and appropriate for children's toys.

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I get the Poly importance especially in a kitchen. The are a bunch of factors I didn't want to use poly on the doors. I put 7 or 8 coats on the drawer fronts. Sanding most of it back trying to get the bubbles out of the finish and they look very nice. Except they look a bit plastic to me, manufactured. But very nice. I learned a few things making such simple drawer fronts. I learned maybe I should have used a sanding sealer and maybe I would not have to put so many coats on - maybe. Maybe I should have just thinned out the coats and would not have gotten bubbles or they would have dissipated - probably. The twist is I set out to put a lot of coats on. I had painted a couple of car as a kid and it was always about the finish having depth. But what i am learning is the wood has its own depth. But there is a need for poly. But I also learned that poly will change the color of curly white maple or turn any white maple amber (well it will give an amber hue to anything). Learning this was a sad thing. I lost 2 sheets of maple that i had chosen by continually checking stock at 4 different locations over the course of several months. Yes yes shame on me. But i learned. So now my project has become an experiment of different finishes. With focus on making them look the same to anyone who is not a woodworker. In a few months or years I will know if the advertisement is true or not - by keeping it as real as possible sans poly. (well maybe just a little on one door above the stove)

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  • 2 weeks later...

I read that and there is a lot to be said about water based finishes. 

Discussion - why are we still using oil based finishes. Has anyone here been using water based exclusively? I have read they are not as durable. Is that true? Does adding a coat or two make them as durable? 

 

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On 9/21/2021 at 8:35 PM, JFII said:

I read that and there is a lot to be said about water based finishes. 

Discussion - why are we still using oil based finishes. Has anyone here been using water based exclusively? I have read they are not as durable. Is that true? Does adding a coat or two make them as durable? 

 

Great question(s)! 

I use water based exclusively except on outdoor projects.

My indoor go to is a coat or two of General Finishes ARS , followed by 3-4 coats of GF High Performance satin Topcoat. 

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@JFII, my experience is limited to a couple of brands, but each type has its place. For most applications without added color, I prefer the warm amber tone that an oil based finish provides. I also appreciate the linger working time,since I can't spray.

For top coating over a colored finish, stain or paint, I like General Finishes High Performance satin. It goes on easily, levels nicely, and dries quickly. Water borne finishes like High Performance are generally more 'clear', and don't affect thebase color much. As for durability, I think they are pretty close. 

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  • 4 weeks later...

OK what about durability of water based poly vs oil based. Or other oil / solvent based products like lacquer which does have a water based option. What about Tung I don't think it has a water based option.

BTW

1) on comparing products The DAFT Lacquer products went on smoother (sprayed or brushed) especially when brushing  even though the DEFT brush able lacquer (satin) dam near look like thick milk  but dried with a good satin sheen and  showed off the underlying wood grain better that the Minwax products which were more opaque.

2) Purdy colored brush in my case a blue one started to leach out the blue color at first rinse and continue leaching color even after several rinses. Don't bother wasting your thinner Purdy will only refund the brush not the thinner you wasted 

 

Topic? contact adhesives 

purdy-brush-20210804_152831.jpg

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