What's on the bench.


Chestnut
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On 12/27/2021 at 12:32 AM, wtnhighlander said:

Coop, I think white oak's weather resistance is somewhat dependant on the average regional humidity. My house has WRC siding that is in fine shape after 30 years, but a white oak bench I built for Cody and the neighbor kids to rest on between backyard basketball games fell apart after two years in the weather, warped until the joinery broke. Another member here ( @curlyoak?) has mentioned great difficulties with mold forming on a WO door in the even more humid climate of Florida. It may resist rot and bugs, but humidity makes it move a lot, and it stains from mold very easily.

A WO front door with the best varnish failed. Mold and mildew got under the finish and made a mess. I thought I could strip it, kill the mildew and re varnish. Wrong. After another try I realized it is the wrong wood. I was told that the cell structure allows mildew to get in. Regardless how much I varnished the door bottom. I was told that red oak would work. Didn't want to go there. So I replaced it with Sapele. Works like a champ. and has nice look. Just like mahogany. There is nothing as good as teak but over the top on cost. And teak contains silica which dulls all edges. People have asked me to do millwork on teak. I agreed only if they pay for the sharpening and the down time. No one is interested in that.

This is a subtropical issue. I know WO works in other places. Not here for outside.

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10 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

Drew, it will go easier if you kerf out as much waste as possible.

I didn't do the greatest removing waste with the fret saw. I'll take it to band saw and remove closer to the base line one the next corners. This stuff just refuses to chop though ....

10 hours ago, Coop said:

Yeah, that stuff is super soft. I didn’t know that white oak was that weather resistant until listening to you guys. Compared to the red cedar, how would white oak hold up on a project like that?

I'm trying to use up scraps. If it wasn't WRC it'd be redwood. I want to save the redwood for bird houses though. One of these years I'm going to make some.

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We have White Oak siding on our house, and barn.  It's been hard as a rock since 1980.  I built a number of houses using it for siding, from the late '70's, to the late '80's.  I could buy a truckload back then for $100 a thousand, with 15 cents a foot more for dressed.

I built my first couple of houses with WRC.  Woodpeckers, and Flying Squirrels thought they were big, dead trees, and the siding suffered, offering homes in the attics for Flying Squirrels.  That was when I went to White Oak, and it only gives woodpeckers headaches.

Ours has never had any finish on it.  I pressure wash it about every 10 years.  It does turn black from mildew, but the pressure washer brings it right back to looking new.  Some of the houses I sold, with WO siding have been painted, or stained.  Those houses have had to have some boards replaced.  I think moisture gets under the coating, and can't get out.

We had a White Oak deck that lasted some few years past ten years, but it's really close to the ground, and stayed wet a lot.  That was replaced with treated wood, old type treatment, and that replacement is still in use.

I think as long as it can dry back out, it lasts pretty good.  No finish is going to keep moisture from getting in, and once it gets in, all of it will never get back out.

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On 12/27/2021 at 9:28 AM, Tom King said:

I think as long as it can dry back out, it lasts pretty good.  No finish is going to keep moisture from getting in, and once it gets in, all of it will never get back out

I think no finish would work here in Florida. Probably need pressure cleaning more often.

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I have an outdoor WRC bench. If I varnished it it would look nice bit the environment around here would require me to scrape and sand every 2 years. So I didn't varnish it and left it unfinished. Not as pretty but the best part is no maintenance. I might pressure clean the top in a few more years.

I have made a few cedar outdoor benches for people and told them about finished or unfinished. I also said if I varnish it does not mean I will refinish it. All chose unfinished.

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Interesting observation about white oak. Part of our Christmas decor includes some 'stake lights' that go out on the lawn. The plastic stakes & brackets were all the worse for wear, so this year I cobbled together some replacements, using white oak scraps from the shop. No finish, just raw wood. When I collected them for the return trip to the attic today, the portion of the stakes that have been buried in the West Tennessee clay for the last month were india-ink black. All the rest was pretty much exactly as it was the day I made them. I guess the soil here is more acidic than I thought.

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On 12/29/2021 at 3:22 PM, Chestnut said:

Is the collection working well? That looks like a lot of stuff but DANG that is maximizing hard sections and minimizing flex. It looks awesome! Want to come do mine?

Unfortunately I haven’t been able to try it out yet. I worked on piecing it together after applying finish to a shelf so I didn’t want to forget to open a blast gate and throw dust in the air. 
 

Previously I had one long flex hose that I hooked up to the machine I was using (or didn’t, if I was feeling lazy). So even the machines that were 5’ away had to go through the 25’ flex. Even with a couple 90* turns this should be much improved. I’m not sure I’ll keep this shop layout, but the drain pipe is cheap enough and I’ll be able to reuse at least some of the lengths. I’m trying to get my shop cleaner and more organized so that I can get back to getting things made. This is all an attempt toward that. I’ll post a sketch of my new layout tonight.

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On 12/31/2021 at 4:46 PM, Chestnut said:

I've slid backwards ... bought a pocket hole jig.

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Made my first pocket hole joint.

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I bought their vise grip type clamps and they are very useful, especially for sheet goods. 

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14 hours ago, treeslayer said:

A lot of us have them, me included, they have their place, and when it is needed or called for I get mine out, strong fast assembly. 

12 hours ago, gee-dub said:

+1 A real problem solver.

I've been in spots where I'm making a larger plywood piece and i need something to be able to be disassembled and reassembled on site. This is the 2nd or 3rd time I've been in this spot so i figured it was time. I'm going to have to find a special spot to hide it.

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On 12/31/2021 at 2:46 PM, Chestnut said:

I've slid backwards ... bought a pocket hole jig.

All is good as long as you don't go out and buy the pro model.

On 1/1/2022 at 5:21 AM, Chestnut said:

I'm going to have to find a special spot to hide it.

Be careful or you won't know were it is when you next need it.;)

I have had one for about 6 years and I was glad I did to two times I used it since then.

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