Table Saw Blade


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I have another basic question that I hope the group does not mind…thanks for all of the answers folks have provided on my past questions as they have been great help!!!  This one is about a table saw blade. 
 

1.  I think it is time to clean my blade. I noticed the teeth have a build up on them but I was not sure exactly what I should use to clean them and what I should scrub them with so I do not damage or dull the carbide tips. 

2. Any real tips on how you know when it is time to send the blade off to be sharpened?  Is this just a feel you start to get after you have worked wood enough with a blade and your saw you can tell when it does not start to cut as well?  

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I got the Rockler blade cleaning kit one year for Christmas. It has everything you need to do the cleaning. The soap solution does the job quickly without messing up the blade. 5 minute soak, quick once over with the brush, rinse and pour the soapy stuff back in the bottle. Everything into the cleaning tray, add the lid and slide it under the cabinet. Easy peasy. 

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On 10/1/2021 at 7:42 AM, Woodworking_Hobby said:

I have another basic question that I hope the group does not mind…thanks for all of the answers folks have provided on my past questions as they have been great help!!!  This one is about a table saw blade. 
 

1.  I think it is time to clean my blade. I noticed the teeth have a build up on them but I was not sure exactly what I should use to clean them and what I should scrub them with so I do not damage or dull the carbide tips. 

2. Any real tips on how you know when it is time to send the blade off to be sharpened?  Is this just a feel you start to get after you have worked wood enough with a blade and your saw you can tell when it does not start to cut as well?  

My two cents . . . Like so many things, cleaning your blade takes just a few minutes if you don't let it go too long. I have a plastic tray from the dollar store and some L.A.Awesome from the same place.  I also have a heavy plastic "toothbrush" format parts cleaning brush.  They come in packs from Harbor Freight for cheap and I have been using the first one for years.

Put the blade in the tray, spray with L.A. Awesome, and go back to the saw and do a quick maintenance check of bearings, fasteners, etc.  Go back to the tray and brush around the teeth lightly making sure you get the face of the tooth.  Rinse, dry and return the blade to the saw or put it in the rack as appropriate.

A lot of our routine maintenance tasks take just moments if we do them regularly. ;)

As to when to clean . . . Whenever the teeth have build up on them that isn't blasting clear with use.

As to when to sharpen . . . when you notice increased effort to perform an operation.  If you miss this indicator, watch for reduced performance in the form of rough cuts or burning; this would indicate you are overdue. 

I keep a pair of my most used blades on hand.  That way I am not stopped when a set goes out for sharpening.  Sending them in multiples also saves on postage.  I used to have a good local sharpener but like so many of my local service based companies, the quality has dropped to where I cannot use them.  I imagine the old strokers have retired like I have and left the work to the next wave.

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On 10/4/2021 at 6:49 PM, treeslayer said:

Another vote for L.A. Awesome from the dollar store thanks to @gee-dubfor that advice that stuff works ! And he has the procedure down pat

Thanks for the advice!  Do you ever use bladecote or something similar to help protect the blades in storage when done?  I am guessing you cannot really use an oil to protect as could cause issues with wood and glues if you do not wipe fully clean when done. 

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So kind of related but not really; has anyone ever made a throat plate for their table saw out of wood?  Mine did not come with an insert for dado blades and they are sold out everywhere. I found an old article about making zero clearance inserts for your saw out of would and you use have to be careful when making the first cut similar to store bought ones. Just wondering if anyone has a home made throat plate and if there is anything to watch out for when going that route. 

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14 minutes ago, Woodworking_Hobby said:

So kind of related but not really; has anyone ever made a throat plate for their table saw out of wood?  Mine did not come with an insert for dado blades and they are sold out everywhere. I found an old article about making zero clearance inserts for your saw out of would and you use have to be careful when making the first cut similar to store bought ones. Just wondering if anyone has a home made throat plate and if there is anything to watch out for when going that route. 

I've made quite a few. I make mine out of plywood so there is less worry with expansion and contraction. I use screws for leveling and also to make sure the plate is ticht in it's slot.

This picture shows my dado blade throat plate.

DSC_4960-01.thumb.jpeg.0550d376faeb172088127d6facb0fd0a.jpeg

This picture shows my regular blade throat plate. This one is 1/2" cherry plywood (scraps)

0209212010-01.thumb.jpeg.193cf8fc1ff1edff674db1c0b2e4f17f.jpeg

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1 hour ago, Woodworking_Hobby said:

So kind of related but not really; has anyone ever made a throat plate for their table saw out of wood?  Mine did not come with an insert for dado blades and they are sold out everywhere. I found an old article about making zero clearance inserts for your saw out of would and you use have to be careful when making the first cut similar to store bought ones. Just wondering if anyone has a home made throat plate and if there is anything to watch out for when going that route. 

I’ve made a lot of them out of wood for my Delta saw, I used the original plate for a pattern, used double stick tape and a pattern bit in the router table, made a whole set for different sizes of dado blades

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On 10/6/2021 at 10:33 AM, treeslayer said:

I’ve made a lot of them out of wood for my Delta saw, I used the original plate for a pattern, used double stick tape and a pattern bit in the router table, made a whole set for different sizes of dado blades

I've done those, as well as three different plates for 45* 22 1/2* and 33*

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I just move the fence over the insert but not so the blade could possibly rise up into it lock the fence down, then I use a scrap of wood and set it on the other edge of the ZCI hold the scrap down with your hand away from the blade turn the saw on then raise the blade through the ZCI.

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On 10/6/2021 at 12:54 PM, RichardA said:

I've done those, as well as three different plates for 45* 22 1/2* and 33*

I need to make some angled ones as well. For some reason my brain can't work out how raising the blade at a 45* angle will work. Guess it's just one of those things I need to do and not try to understand it.

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Take your insert out and while looking inside tilt your bade watch how the entire carriage tilts. So when the blade is raised in whatever angle it is raised in that plane. When the blade goes through the ZCI it slices through just the same as if it was slicing through at 90deg.

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Seeing is believing.   Just go to your TS, with the power off, crank the blade down and remove the throat plate.  Now angle the blade to 45* and watch while you crank it up.  The blade will extend out of the table along a path parallel to the blade and 45* to the table.  

Dave H beat me to it, but only by a minute. B)

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On 10/6/2021 at 3:24 PM, legenddc said:

I need to make some angled ones as well. For some reason my brain can't work out how raising the blade at a 45* angle will work. Guess it's just one of those things I need to do and not try to understand it.

Roll your blade all the way down below the table top.  Insert your blank ZCI.  Move your fence to the edge of the new plate. have a piece of longer wood in your other hand to hold the side of the plate your fence isn't touching and slowly raise your blade as high as you can get it to go, at whatever angle you set it at.   Then lower the blade, and since it's rare that you would use your blade at it's full height, you now have air space around your blade to help your DC pull your waste away

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