Sideboard TV Stand


legenddc
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After months and months of discussions and a possible refusal to build a farmhouse TV stand with barn doors, I'm finally ready to start working on my next big project, a sideboard TV stand. I must have gone through 500 pictures of TV stands before I finally found what my wife wanted, The Contemporary Sideboard from FineWoodworking #277.

1738730479_ContemporarySideboardFineWoodworking.jpeg.6ff4a09ecaf2403e1bc1f94b16376ade.jpeg

I did a rough full size sketch so we could make sure it fit where it's going. The TV is going to be mounted on the wall so I'm not concerned about the weight of it on the stand.

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Ours will be made from all cherry and will have 4 doors. The legs will be shorter so the TV isn't up too high. Since they're basically a stand for the cabinet I can always make taller ones if we want to repurpose it later. So picture the above in all cherry, another door wider and lower. After finding a new lumber dealer I finally have all of the wood that I need for this unless I really screw things up.

I don't have a Domino (only biscuits) so the joinery for the miter joints and interior vertical divider will have to be improvised. I'd like to try mitering all 4 sides but Chestnut suggested just the tops with mitered trim all around. Depending on how the top two corners go that may change my mind.

  1. How to reinforce the miter?
  2. I need to come up with a way to clamp all of this. It will be about 64" wide so if I go full length clamps some more and extenders will have to be purchased/made.
  3. The doors will be inset and I'm not sure what door hinges I need. The trim on the case will stick out some so I need to find the right style.
  4. For the back of the case is it better to go with a 15"tall x 32" wide panel with the grain vertically or horizontally? I haven't fully thought through the wood movement issue.
  5. I'll have to test it when I get to the doors, but I'm debating on running the grain vertically for the panels. I think I have a wide enough board to only need one with continuous grain but I don't know how it will look.

Hopefully after this week I can start on this. Being as I have a long panel to glue up and a short shop I'm going to be limited to working on this during the weekend when the kids are awake. Once those parts are sorted I can keep chipping away at night on things.

Open and welcome to any suggestions, tips, criticism, etc.

 

 

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5 hours ago, legenddc said:

I need to come up with a way to clamp all of this. It will be about 64" wide so if I go full length clamps some more and extenders will have to be purchased/made.

This is an old posting, but there are some ideas on how to clamp lengths too long for any one clamp.

 

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@wtnhighlander Thank you for the @derekcohen tip. I'm going through some of his old posts now. Would this work for the back or do you mean more  of a door duplication? I'd like the back to be nice even though there's nowhere we could put this to see it. Maybe one day we'll have loads of space so it might as well be done right now.

1307810501_ScreenShot2021-10-17at6_50_45PM.thumb.jpg.43105911ff0f5ed8fa98ec4b691e17c3.jpg

 

@Mark JThanks for that. I was looking at it earlier. I have 2 pipe clamps I could use that are long enough and 2 50" Bessey parallel clamps that could work with the extenders. I swear someone here had made their own. I'll find it eventually. I think I'll need some more 24" clamps for the top/bottom.

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I was suggesting to make the back look like the front, but if it will likely never be seen, that is a lot of effort for little reward. The plywood panels should do nicely.

I was going to suggest that a 2x4 with stop blocks and wedges is a cheap way to deal with a unique clamping situation, but with lumber prices still being a bit steep, pipe clamps might be cheaper!

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I really like that design and look. I'm not sure where you are concerned about strength but TVs are light. The 200 lb gorilla using the tv stand to hang a picture on the wall would be the largest load and i wouldn't think twice about it with your design.

IMO your designed legs look to bulky and big. I strongly feel the design and look benefits from being delicate and light. A 1.5" leg tapered down to 1" would both be extremely stout and help the visual. As long as you kept grain run out to a minimum a 1.25" leg tapered to 0.75" would look pretty good and be more than strong enough as well. Ideally those legs would come from perfectly rift sawn material. Using 8/4 material you could rotate the blank inside the board to ensure proper grain orientation.

In this post i showed some parallel clamp connectors, if you have parallel clamps.

https://www.woodtalkonline.com/topic/29353-8-drawer-dresser-in-walnut/?do=findComment&comment=384638

Details on how I made them here.

https://www.woodtalkonline.com/topic/29353-8-drawer-dresser-in-walnut/?do=findComment&comment=384753

The options above are suitable but I find myself in the situation where I need an extension more and more often and I use these a few times a year now. My only modification to them would be to glue on a top so the clamp bar is boxed on all 4 sides. It would just make them a bit easier to use.

 

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On 10/17/2021 at 10:45 PM, wtnhighlander said:

I was suggesting to make the back look like the front, but if it will likely never be seen, that is a lot of effort for little reward. The plywood panels should do nicely.

I was going to suggest that a 2x4 with stop blocks and wedges is a cheap way to deal with a unique clamping situation, but with lumber prices still being a bit steep, pipe clamps might be cheaper!

Pipe is up too I think. A 10' pipe is $28 around here now and 6' is around $18.

On 10/18/2021 at 9:25 AM, Chestnut said:

I really like that design and look. I'm not sure where you are concerned about strength but TVs are light. The 200 lb gorilla using the tv stand to hang a picture on the wall would be the largest load and i wouldn't think twice about it with your design.

IMO your designed legs look to bulky and big. I strongly feel the design and look benefits from being delicate and light. A 1.5" leg tapered down to 1" would both be extremely stout and help the visual. As long as you kept grain run out to a minimum a 1.25" leg tapered to 0.75" would look pretty good and be more than strong enough as well. Ideally those legs would come from perfectly rift sawn material. Using 8/4 material you could rotate the blank inside the board to ensure proper grain orientation.

In this post i showed some parallel clamp connectors, if you have parallel clamps.

https://www.woodtalkonline.com/topic/29353-8-drawer-dresser-in-walnut/?do=findComment&comment=384638

Details on how I made them here.

https://www.woodtalkonline.com/topic/29353-8-drawer-dresser-in-walnut/?do=findComment&comment=384753

The options above are suitable but I find myself in the situation where I need an extension more and more often and I use these a few times a year now. My only modification to them would be to glue on a top so the clamp bar is boxed on all 4 sides. It would just make them a bit easier to use.

 

Thank you for the input. I didn't scale down the legs, but since they're 7" shorter than the original design they'll need some work. Once the case is done I will pick up some 2x4s and do some mockups both for height and leg thickness. I'm unsure still if I'll do the Barnsley joint or not. The Shaker End Table I made will be right by this so I'd like to light. I did find a Shaker-ish version of this but the "client" rejected it.

I thought it was you who made the extensions. I'll have to make some and will burn up some Home Depot gift cards on more clamps.

On 10/18/2021 at 9:44 AM, Tom King said:

That's a great looking sideboard, but when we're watching TV, I want the center of the screen right at eye height when we're sitting down.  I don't want to look up at it.

TV should be at the same height it's at now, which I think is a little high. Will try to lower it some if I can and test before I make the legs.

 

Had a thought in the shower this morning to use a track saw for the miters instead of the table saw. Keeping at 9' long board square with a table saw blade could be challenging. Will have to test it.

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On 10/18/2021 at 8:27 AM, legenddc said:

 

Had a thought in the shower this morning to use a track saw for the miters instead of the table saw. Keeping at 9' long board square with a table saw blade could be challenging. Will have to test it.

I agree, I would also use a track saw to make this miter cut. 

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11 minutes ago, legenddc said:

Thank you for the input. I didn't scale down the legs, but since they're 7" shorter than the original design they'll need some work. Once the case is done I will pick up some 2x4s and do some mockups both for height and leg thickness. I'm unsure still if I'll do the Barnsley joint or not. The Shaker End Table I made will be right by this so I'd like to light. I did find a Shaker-ish version of this but the "client" rejected it.

I thought it was you who made the extensions. I'll have to make some and will burn up some Home Depot gift cards on more clamps.

Yes full scale mock ups will go a LONG way in helping visualize the proportions. Also i was guessing at dimensions just based off the thumb in the picture. I know my thumb is dang near a perfect inch wide. I end up using my thumb to measure things more often that I probably should...

Not sure if i mentioned this in my post, make sure to use a rugged hardwood. Hickory, Elm, white oak, ash, any dense hard wood that resists splitting.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I think Kid 1 just didn't want to sleep. We're in a townhouse and the family room is right above the shop. If it's too annoying my wife goes up to our room to watch TV, but she also knows I'm building things for us so she's okay with it. We're soon getting our floors redone so I might throw some insulation under the subfloor above the shop. Seems easier than a second layer of drywall on the ceiling if the subfloor is up.

If you take any measures to quiet the noise and it works let me know!

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Did you abandon the waterfall all together or did you still keep the material sorted to try and somewhat achieve the effect? For larger boards that aren't feasible to joint I've reduced the size rough but kept the boards organized and the waterfall effect still worked out pretty well.

1 hour ago, legenddc said:

If you take any measures to quiet the noise and it works let me know!

I did the denim insulation in the open ceiling of my shop and it helped knock the noise down to the house. Going helical heads and induction motor planer also went a long way to reduce noise.

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On 11/2/2021 at 10:19 AM, Chestnut said:

Did you abandon the waterfall all together or did you still keep the material sorted to try and somewhat achieve the effect? For larger boards that aren't feasible to joint I've reduced the size rough but kept the boards organized and the waterfall effect still worked out pretty well.

I did the denim insulation in the open ceiling of my shop and it helped knock the noise down to the house. Going helical heads and induction motor planer also went a long way to reduce noise.

I kept everything sorted and it will be close, but not perfect.

Hopefully insulation will help some. I've heard upgrading to helical heads will help but right now I don't want to throw more money at the problem. Insulation is more of a one time option if the flooring gets ripped out. When I have more than 160 sq. ft. some tools will get upgraded

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20 hours ago, legenddc said:

I kept everything sorted and it will be close, but not perfect.

Hopefully insulation will help some. I've heard upgrading to helical heads will help but right now I don't want to throw more money at the problem. Insulation is more of a one time option if the flooring gets ripped out. When I have more than 160 sq. ft. some tools will get upgraded

Just to note rock wool or denim is better than fiberglass. Something that has some density.

If your shop has sheet rock ceiling it might also help making some acoustic panels. I know the best way is to decouple everything like Paul did on his home theater but despite that reducing the sound bouncing around might help some. DIY acoustic panels can't be that hard or expensive. A frame faced with some fabric filled with insulation.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Can't believe it's been so long but I guess I was gone for a few weekends. Finally got some time on this yesterday and will have some more today. My goal is a dry-assembly of the case before the day ends. Finished milling the back panels yesterday and glued them up as well as cut the case to final width. After some coffee here I'll be cutting the grooves and rabbets for the back panel. Then mitering the case and the dado for the middle panel.

Went down the rabbit hole last night trying to find hinges. Is there another brand people like for Euro hinges better than Blum? If not, where's everyone buying them. 

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That's certainly a possibility. I was thinking of a clean look on the outside without hinges showing. Possibly even no knobs and a push release but I'm not 100% either way. Just want to make sure I get something ordered and it will be here relatively soon so I'm not stuck waiting on hinges before I can move forward.

Just looked at the sideboard you did and I like it with the Horton hinges. 4" of hinges on a 14-15" door might be too much. I'll ask my wife when she's home, until then it's time to get some work in the shop done before my kids get home.

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17 hours ago, Coop said:

I used the Blum euro self close hinges on an armoire I recently built and they are the cat’s meow. As I have a Rockler not so close by, I bought mine there. 

Rockler is a good source. When I'm buying 40 for a large set of cabinets i have to find a less expensive source though. Good hardware is expensive, but worth it.

On 11/21/2021 at 7:55 AM, legenddc said:

Possibly even no knobs and a push release but I'm not 100% either way.

I love the push release on the sideboard I made. It makes the front look cleaner and with an odd number of doors the lack of symmetry with the knobs would bother me.

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Yesterday was frustrating. First after a ton of careful layout, I cut the miter on the wrong side. 2nd time the track jumped some. Had my wife help hold it for the 3rd time and it somehow ended up out of square. Realizing now I should confirm the track itself is straight. I also think cutting both the top/bottom side-by-side (32" wide instead of 16") isn't helping. Will give it one more go one at a time, if not I'll M&T the vertical pieces instead the horizontal ones and then add a small overhang with a slight chamfer like Chestnut's sideboard.

On 11/22/2021 at 9:22 AM, Chestnut said:

Rockler is a good source. When I'm buying 40 for a large set of cabinets i have to find a less expensive source though. Good hardware is expensive, but worth it.

I love the push release on the sideboard I made. It makes the front look cleaner and with an odd number of doors the lack of symmetry with the knobs would bother me.

I spoke with my wife about hinges. Sensing my frustration from the failed miter joints she asked which were easier. I informed her I'm equally incompetent at both so pick whichever she wanted. Euro-hinges it is.

For the Blum hinges I've learned I need the clip, mounting plate and screws, but there are 8 different mounting plates for a frameless 0mm height for an inset door. Any recommendations? This one is the most popular if that matters. I know I need to switch from soft-close to free swing if I do the push release.

My dad has the Kreg jig for the clip install. I'll pick up a jig for the mounting plate too since I'm sure I'll use it again.

 

Finally, thanks everyone for all of the help, feedback and suggestions. Really really appreciate it as I try to advance my woodworking skills.

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