Floating-Top Table


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I’ve been lucky so far with epoxy. I try and get the height of the blue tape the same above the leg when applying it. I gradually add the epoxy to the leg with an acid brush. Should one leg be off, it can be sanded easily with an 80 grit sanding block. 

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2 hours ago, Mark J said:

I like the idea of the epoxy foot pads, but I wonder how you insure the table will sit flat?  One pour could be a little more than another.

You'd level it the same way as without the epoxy feet. I have to level most of the proejcts i complete as they are usually off by 1/32" or so.

There is a good table saw trick for leveling.

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Thank you Dave! I’m a little disappointed in the feel of the finish. Prior to applying, the surface was really nice. Now it feels like it wants another sanding. Perhaps I should, and apply another coat. Again, the finish is Teak Oil. Anyone have a suggestion? 

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Give that oil some time to cure (weeks) before you try any sanding, or you'll have a gummy mess. DAMHIK. The table looks great, though! 

The 'teak oil' finish I've used is much like BLO, takes a while to fully harden, but can take on a really nice sheen and feel when it does. You may find the brown paper bag trick works wonders.

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That came out real nice Ken.  A very good rendition of Pekovich's table.  Nothing like turning what you thought might be firewood into a piece of furniture, that right there had to make it fun.

On 11/11/2021 at 6:57 AM, bradpotts said:

I really like the contrasting leg cuffs. 

Me too!

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Thanks for the ride-a-long.  I always enjoy watching how others do things, solve problems, and make decisions.  What a great back story and use of some material that was initially a disappointment.  That is a great variation on a great table design.  Some outdoor furniture is in my future so the thread is also timely.  Thanks and the table looks great!

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  • 3 months later...

It has been 3 months now and the sheen or lack there of, is very disappointing. The finish is Teak Oil. The table is under the patio cover and will be exposed to the humidity only. Any suggestions for giving the wood a little more vibrancy? Water borne or oil based poly? Or the usual, apply on the bottom of an unseen piece as a trial? 

From what I have gathered, shellac adheres to everything and everything adheres to shellac. A perfect buffer. Is that the case here? 

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Ken, I would probably go with oil based poly directly over the Teak oil. In my limited experience, shellac degrades in humidity, so I wouldn't bother with it between.

Just a suggestion, but Minwax Tung Oil finish goes on like a wiping poly, but builds a sheen with less thickness, if you want 'close to the wood'. I don't know if there is a satin version, or just gloss. 

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Instead of starting another thread, I thought I would drop it here. I sanded all of the table down nicely with 400 grit and applied Minwax oil based poly. Cleaning instructions are “ Clean up with Regionally Compliant Cleaner”. These folks are running scared. I’ve never seen this before. Anyway, I used mineral spirits, wiped my brush down well and put it away.  Today, the bristles of the new brush are as hard as the handle. I should have realized there was a problem when I didn’t notice any residue in the container. Should I have used lacquer thinner? 

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When i brushed poly, cleaning was a multi step process. I'd clean in a small amount of MS then I'd dump the MS out and pour in new. Think of it as dilution, you probably had enough poly in the fibers of the brush to make a 50:50 MS poly mix. Then you need to dilute it more.

I also finished with a wash of soap and water. I'm afraid soaking won't do it any more though. Once it's hard MS dilutes, it doesn't dissolve. You'll need to use a chemical that will strip the poly from the brush.

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Yeah, that brush may be gone.  

When I need to let a coat of paint dry overnight and I want to use the same brush the next day, I'll wrap the brush in plastic wrap and put it in the freezer.  It'll keep for a day or two.  That's with latex paint, but it might work for oil based polyurethane.

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