New Shop (The New Mossback Workshop)


BonPacific
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What do think you will use to sheath the walls inside?  Or will you leave the insulation exposed?  

If I was going to sheath, I'd be sure to mark the sheathing for the locations of those studs, and the uprights.

Just looking at that structure now and I think it will have some advantages when it comes to hanging a simple tool rack, and some challenges when it comes to high load shelves.

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I'll sheath the lower 8ft at a minimum. Probably going with half-inch t1-11, and I've been going back and forth between painted or natural. The bookshelf framing has pros and cons. Most of the beams will remain proud of the sheathing either way.

If I have to add some heavy shelving or mounts down the line I'll be able to pull down the plywood and add any vertical bracing as necessary.

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Question for y'all. I've got a plank half-wall running 2/3rds (~19ft) of the way between two bays of my shop. I'm thinking of taking one segment of half-wall all the way up, putting vertical lumber storage against it, and taking down the other half-wall. The difference in distance to the door or outside lumber shed is pretty negligible.

Would you take down the wall in the back, leaving a sort of "island" for lumber storage, or take down the middle section and stuff the lumber into a corner?

I can think of a hundred reasons to do either or neither and I'm hitting decision paralysis. Here'a a picture, though it's not easy to parse since my crap is all jumbled in the center if the room.PXL_20220124_010359062.thumb.jpg.131972aa22c1cfc5ea57a2493120405d.jpg

 

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You’re probably not lacking in wall space as I am, in which case, I would take the entire half wall all the way up.

My answer to your question would depend on what is on the other side of the half wall and what your access needs to that area is. Also, consider what electrical receptacles you may need, if any, is on this wall. 

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On 1/23/2022 at 5:28 PM, Coop said:

You’re probably not lacking in wall space as I am, in which case, I would take the entire half wall all the way up.

My answer to your question would depend on what is on the other side of the half wall and what your access needs to that area is. Also, consider what electrical receptacles you may need, if any, is on this wall. 

The other side of that half-wall is just the stairway and storage currently. Some day it could include a spray room, but that's the extent of any real ideation. The 4x4 posts onviously wont move so re-enclosing it would be easy enough to do.

Currently there's one outlet on each post.

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On 1/24/2022 at 6:03 AM, Chestnut said:

If you can't make the decision now, don't. Get in the shop and use it and make the decision later. I don't think it's possible to set up a shop from the get go and have the locations set ahead of time. Get in the mindset that everything will change multiple times because it will. Then when something isn't working and you want to make a change it's a lot easier mentally to just do it.

I've moved my plywood storage area 3-4 times. It's gone out of and then back to the area I have it now.

Lumber storage has changed 5-6 times from various locations.

This is a very good point. I fully recognize my layout will change over time. My issue at the moment is getting to that initial point though, since I need to leave the walls clear and accessible for ongoing insulation/electrical, but my current lumber storage is the back of my truck, which I need to clear out for other uses. I'd rather not just stack everything on the ground, though that's an option. I need to build a rack somewhere, and against the loft isn't any more work than the other options.

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  • 2 weeks later...

That sign looks awesome! Have you thought about painting the recessed parts of the letters? Or painting the flat and leaving the letters wood? It'd really make it pop and would also look like a county/state/national park sign.

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2 minutes ago, Mark J said:

I know everyone else hangs parallel clamps heavy side up, but this makes more sense to me.

I think it makes sense if the head is sitting on the floor or a shelf like you pictured. I like the jaws to stay opened. It's not uncommon for me to use the same width opening multiple times in a row. Now it may sound really lazy but it saves me some effort from having to open and close the jaws of the clamp between uses.

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On 2/6/2022 at 8:27 PM, BonPacific said:

Finished and hanging above the door.
 

That looks great!  In many efforts there comes a time when I reach what I call the "That's It!!!" point.  This is when all other activity stops until I resolve whatever it is that has bugged me for . . .  the . . . last . . . time.  99 times out of 100 this involves clean-up or organizational things :D.  Your recent efforts look great and will pay dividends over an over again.

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On 2/7/2022 at 6:20 AM, Chestnut said:

That sign looks awesome! Have you thought about painting the recessed parts of the letters? Or painting the flat and leaving the letters wood? It'd really make it pop and would also look like a county/state/national park sign.

I did, even picked out a nice forest green I like, but decided that that would call too much attention to the flaws. Keeping it natural felt like a nice compromise and I smile every time I look at it, so I'd call that a success. This probably won't be the last sign I make, so as I get a little better I'll be doing some outdoor signs that'll definitely get painted letters.

On 2/7/2022 at 6:27 AM, Mark J said:

I noticed in your second picture you have some parallel clamps stored heavy side down.  That's how I've done it in my shop. 

I know everyone else hangs parallel clamps heavy side up, but this makes more sense to me.

The interim storage is pretty similar to how I had them in my prior shop, with the parallels sitting underneath the F-styles to conserve wall space. Heavy side down does slightly increase the chances of them wedging shut, particularly on the older Jorgensens, but just feels natural with that wide and flat foot they've got.

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  • BonPacific changed the title to New Shop (The New Mossback Workshop)

There needs to be a section on here, just dedicated to folks that have say, a 800 sq. ft. shop or greater. One of these days, my wife’s going to come out and catch me surfing this stuff and make me come inside! :D

Great looking progress @BonPacific

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I really like that storage with the bankers boxes and shoe boxes stacked 1 high. I've been keeping some of my none-woodworking related things in more project specific shoeboxes (electrical tools, plumbing, etc.) but they're in stacks of 2 which is a pain. Definitely need some storage for parts of current projects like you have.

Keeping that shelf open is nice if you can. Gives you a place to put things before you are able to put them away. I would suggest adding a flat shelf on slides or some sort of platform for you to put a box on to take out what you need or put things away.

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On 2/8/2022 at 6:57 AM, legenddc said:

I really like that storage with the bankers boxes and shoe boxes stacked 1 high. I've been keeping some of my none-woodworking related things in more project specific shoeboxes (electrical tools, plumbing, etc.) but they're in stacks of 2 which is a pain.

Amen.  Cubbies or size specific shelves are great for storage bins of any size.  I think we all have been attracted to the cool factor of stacking or interlocking tool boxes and bins.  My versions of those things not stand, stacked, in an outbuilding serving long term storage needs.  Quick, easy access to your storage bins makes your whole shop flow move smoother IMHO.

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On 2/8/2022 at 7:28 AM, gee-dub said:

Amen.  Cubbies or size specific shelves are great for storage bins of any size.  I think we all have been attracted to the cool factor of stacking or interlocking tool boxes and bins.  My versions of those things not stand, stacked, in an outbuilding serving long term storage needs.  Quick, easy access to your storage bins makes your whole shop flow move smoother IMHO.

I like those interlocking storage bins (I use the Husky version) but only for things that tend to move together to a workspace, get used together, and then get put away again. Pretty much all stuff that happens in the craft room inside the house rather than out in the woodshop. I like the glass jars better for organization within the shop, as I can quickly grab either a few of something or the whole container and bring it to wherever I'm working. Plus the jars are free. For stuff like fasteners I'll buy the largest box I can to stock, and then decant as-needed into clear labelled jars.

On 2/8/2022 at 6:57 AM, legenddc said:

I really like that storage with the bankers boxes and shoe boxes stacked 1 high. I've been keeping some of my none-woodworking related things in more project specific shoeboxes (electrical tools, plumbing, etc.) but they're in stacks of 2 which is a pain. Definitely need some storage for parts of current projects like you have.

Keeping that shelf open is nice if you can. Gives you a place to put things before you are able to put them away. I would suggest adding a flat shelf on slides or some sort of platform for you to put a box on to take out what you need or put things away.

I'll probably keep a small section for "yet to be sorted"/red-tag, but I don't want to have a large area that tempts me to leave junk there. I'm not planning to go full 5S on my workshop, but I do want to try and embrace "a place for everything and everything in it's place" where I can.

It wasn't planned this way, but it just so happened that my old step stool is the perfect height/size to slide boxes from the lower shelf out onto. So I've been using that when I need to dig in with two hands for something. Once I've got the walls insulated I'll also be doing something more permanent with the storage under the stairs, which is currently where I've got my small power tools, and I may put a red-tag/sorting table on that side.

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