I've got a bone to pick about these FRIGGIN' cutting boards!!!


Nick2cd
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I can't move on to any other projects because EVERYONE wants one of these boards! I am completely inundated with friends/family requests. people are mistaking me for John Boos! All joking aside.....it was a google search for a "how to make a cutting board" that led me to Marc's website. im so glad i googled that topic. otherwise, i may have never found Marc's great site or this fantastic forum. i appreciate everyone's input and patience. and i especially appreciate everything Marc does in the way of videos, articles, and the guild. this is a great place to which i have developed an incredible affinity. thanks to everyone here!

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Nick, that board is beautiful. What woods did you use?

Marc,

i have no doubt that im gonna be quite comfy here.

Bovine,

Thanks! I used wild cherry and black walnut. i finished it with General Finishes Salad Bowl finish thinned to approximately 50% with mineral spirits (as per Marc's recommendation).

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The key is to keep raising your prices until the demand waivers or you can retire, which ever comes first.

I can feel you pain I get the same thing with Adirondack chairs I make, everyone wants one. One thing I did last year was to invite a bunch of them over and we made a set of chairs as a group, so everyone learned that they could do it themselves and it was a lot of fun also. My current price for a chair is $100,000.00. I thought that would stop it, then mom called. Time to get some more cypress...

-Gary

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Very nice board! I'm going to give an end grain a try - one of these day. Cherry and walnut were just made for each other. Outstanding combination.

SQ

Thanks Susie! i completely agree about the walnut/cherry combination....they just work so well together. here's my most recent walnut/cherry creation. im getting ready to give it away in the next couple of days.

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I've made three of these so far. I'm finishing up on my 4th but I'm curious if anyone has routed a juice grove in theirs? I'm a bit concerned with the end grain.

i have not routed a juice groove in any of mine, but i would imagine it wouldn't be too difficult. i think you'd be best off cutting it with a minimum of two passes. i don't think the end grain will cause any problems as long as you stay at least 1/2"-3/4" away from the perimeter of the board. that should provide plenty of support from tear-out/blow-out (especially if the groove is cut in multiple passes).

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I started my first end-grain cutting board yesterday, got the boards milled and the first glue-up done. Unfortunately I won't be able to do any more work until this weekend due to traveling for work. This first one will be for my wife, but my mom and my mother-in-law have put in their "orders" for one as well, I am thinking these will be great mothers day gifts.

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I started my first end-grain cutting board yesterday, got the boards milled and the first glue-up done. Unfortunately I won't be able to do any more work until this weekend due to traveling for work. This first one will be for my wife, but my mom and my mother-in-law have put in their "orders" for one as well, I am thinking these will be great mothers day gifts.

you better get some extra material. these won't be your last!

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  • 2 months later...

I was so glad to see this post as I have become addicted to end grain cutting boards. Newly retired and doing what I really want....woodworking, the end grain process seemed like a good challenge that I would learn new skills from. Yes it was! From Cherry to Purple Heart. Maple,Walnut, Bloodwood....all fun to work with.

how ever, I have pushed the limits....at least of my skill. I made a end grain chess table from Maple and Walnut. It is 2" squares and is 1 1/2" thick...end grain. I glued an edge grain, 1 1/2 wide Maple strip followed by another of Walnut to the perimeter of the chess board, mitred the corners. I then followed this with 4" wide African Mahogony making a 30" table that is intended for use as a "Pub table". The table stands 36" tall on it's legs.

I completed this construction last November. I used titebond III, and finished with Waterlox.

During this past month of torrential downpour we have had in the Adirondacks, the chess board expanded with moisture and slit open the two mitred corners that were done during final assembly. I had mitred and biscuit jointed the two opposite corners prior to final assembly...these held!

Any suggestions from anyone with experience will be most appreciated!

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I was so glad to see this post as I have become addicted to end grain cutting boards. Newly retired and doing what I really want....woodworking, the end grain process seemed like a good challenge that I would learn new skills from. Yes it was! From Cherry to Purple Heart. Maple,Walnut, Bloodwood....all fun to work with.

how ever, I have pushed the limits....at least of my skill. I made a end grain chess table from Maple and Walnut. It is 2" squares and is 1 1/2" thick...end grain. I glued an edge grain, 1 1/2 wide Maple strip followed by another of Walnut to the perimeter of the chess board, mitred the corners. I then followed this with 4" wide African Mahogony making a 30" table that is intended for use as a "Pub table". The table stands 36" tall on it's legs.

I completed this construction last November. I used titebond III, and finished with Waterlox.

During this past month of torrential downpour we have had in the Adirondacks, the chess board expanded with moisture and slit open the two mitred corners that were done during final assembly. I had mitred and biscuit jointed the two opposite corners prior to final assembly...these held!

Any suggestions from anyone with experience will be most appreciated!

The only thing I can think is to do a tongue on the end grain part and a dado for the outside perimeter of long grain. It will be a lot of expansion and contraction through out the year, and you can't just glue them together without allowing for that.

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The only thing I can think is to do a tongue on the end grain part and a dado for the outside perimeter of long grain. It will be a lot of expansion and contraction through out the year, and you can't just glue them together without allowing for that.

Thanks! I've been trying to figure out a way to allow for expansion/contraction. That's one more lesson that's tough for a beginner like myself. I had thought about leaving the end grain as a separate piece from the long grain as the legs attach to the long grain section. I was asked if I could make the board revesible with Chinese Checkers on the reverse. Maybe this is a good idea!?

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Thanks! I've been trying to figure out a way to allow for expansion/contraction. That's one more lesson that's tough for a beginner like myself. I had thought about leaving the end grain as a separate piece from the long grain as the legs attach to the long grain section. I was asked if I could make the board revesible with Chinese Checkers on the reverse. Maybe this is a good idea!?

To get an idea of how long the tongue and grooves need to be use this Shrinkulator You'll depending on where you are in you humidity cycle will determine how much gap will be needed between the long and edge grain. Good luck.

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