Marc's a Great Teacher


Keggers
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Marc has taught me many things when it comes to woodworking. His videos are the best on the net. I learn something every time I watch one. I've learned techniques that I haven't had the opportunity yet to put into practice, but have them at my disposal when needed.

I was filling a knothole yesterday using the same technique that I learned from Marc and started wondering what others might have learned from his teachings. What is the single most important lesson/technique you have learned from Marc?

As a seller of high quality surfaced lumber, I don't have as much time to build as I'd like. I'd say the most important lesson that I've learned from Marc is to how to fill knotholes in boards to make them sellable. I used to just cut away the knots - selling only the prime portion of the boards, resulting in lots of wasted material and money. Now, when I have a board with beautiful grain and a troublesome knot, I just repair the knot and sell it.

So, what is the single most important lesson you've learned?

Oh, and his technique for applying a wiping varnish was great too! It's hard to pick just one!

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Is it weird that posts like this always make me feel.......weird, lol. I always expect responses like, "Marc sucks!" "He's too hairy!" "I hate his t-shirts!" :)

Sorry buddy. I didn't mean to make you feel weird. I just thought since you hear all the time that you suck, and you're too hairy, :lol: it would be nice to give you some positive feedback.

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Well Marc, get comfortable with that weird feeling because I think you've contributed more information to more people than even you realize... It was the discovery of your podcast in it's infancy that gave me the courage to delve into the woodworking thing after having not done any since middle school...

I was just discussing with a MikeMa from the TWW chat room yesterday about your knot filling... I've been working on a twin bed for my soon to be 4 year old son and due to his age and his obsession with banging things and putting stickers every where, the wife suggested something cheap and easily replaceable... We settled on #2 common doug fir that will be distressed prior to finishing... well let me tell you... you aren't just paranoid with those knots! I hadn't done anything with them and while planing a board down I damn near hit the deck thinking there was a gunshot as the planer ripped out and devoured a knot sending it hurling towards the impeller of the dust collector... I spent the rest of the afternoon with blue tape and epoxy... (and some fresh underpants)

I think one of your most important lessons is, don't be afraid to make mistakes... It's very easy when watching someone like Norm or even Roy building something so effortlessly, and to a seemingly inhuman level of precision and get a bit intimidated... You're always quick to point out your mistakes and explain how to correct those issues. Even in your post-production you do a fantastic job of proofing your material and correcting any major errors or omissions in-line with the content (instead of posting a correction weeks later in a blog post or article that makes it hard to follow)

Most of what I know about woodworking has been learned from 4 people, Marc, Norm, Roy, and Tommy MacDonald... So kudos to all of you for helping to advance our craft and my own personal quest for woodworking knowledge.

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Well, if it makes you feel ANY better, you ARE too hairy. But, aside from that, how to fix mistakes; Many of them. How to finish properly. Those are my BIG two. I'm sure I can think of more if I give it time. But, those really cover a lot.

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I'd only be quoting one of his tweets to say he's too hairy although apparently in the wrong places blink.gif

The most important thing I learned... hmm, how to test a drawer install. Might have to think back to know that reference although I suspect Beechwood will be able to quote episode and timestamp tongue.gif

Kidding aside, I learned the hobby from him so this massive void in my bank account is his fault. As is the paint fade on my car. But I'm okay with that.

"One" thing? That pink boas have no place in the shop.

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I learned from Marc its OK to screw up I know that sounds weird but for years I always felt like an inferior wood worker or I just sucked I would watch videos,read articles and watch TV shows and they always seemed to cut it perfect, make perfect joints etc etc but I always seem to have something even if a little thing go wrong in a majority of the complex projects I have built and it is a very reassuring thing to see Marc also make the odd mistake and actually show what happened and how he went about fixing it. So yeah I learned from Marc you dont have to be a faultless robot to be a good wood worker. Oh and that when someone hands me salad dressing to check the cap before I shake it! (seeing how you brought up the T shirts lol) :P

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The most important thing I learned... hmm, how to test a drawer install. Might have to think back to know that reference although I suspect Beechwood will be able to quote episode and timestamp tongue.gif

I can't pass up a challenge...

I think most of the Guild Builds have lots of detail on drawers, but for non-guildies there's the Assembly Table Base at around 12:30.

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What I didn't learn from Marc is that when filling knots (something I just finished doing before packing it in for he night) if you don't have a nifty measured pump dispenser, adding a little too much hardener to the epoxy will cause it to super heat and start steaming... (no joke, I had to set my little cup down just now cause it was too hot to hold and when I looked over it was steaming...) Maybe that should be a topic of safety week... ensuring proper ratios when mixing products that cause chemical reactions... I'm sure it would be right up his alley given his background...

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