duckkisser

buying a used lathe need advise

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ok thinking of picking up a lathe to have around the house. dont have room for a full size shop thats what i got work for (teaching wood shop)so i thought i would get a lthe to pull out of garage into driveway to keep busy on the weekends and to nock out a hour or so at night making bowls and what not. its too big a pain to drive to work to use the shop.

going to buy a used lathe on cregslist. need some advise on possible brands that wood be decent for a beginner need something that will be stable and balanced. and easily ajustable. anyone got any advise on what to look for in a machine's capablities and size? what should i look for in the machine? what parts might be missing that i should check on? what tools should i get that comes with it?

here a few that i just checked on cregslist

http://chicago.craigslist.org/nwc/tls/2500217311.html

http://chicago.craigslist.org/nwi/tls/2498388617.html

http://chicago.craigslist.org/sox/tls/2498816862.html

http://chicago.craigslist.org/wcl/tls/2488189772.html

http://chicago.craigslist.org/wcl/tls/2493129129.html

http://chicago.craigslist.org/sox/tls/2492724185.html

http://chicago.craigslist.org/wcl/tls/2492276346.html

http://chicago.craigslist.org/nwc/tls/2491838468.html

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This only machine I would consider in your list for a beginner would be the Jet. It is self contained, just powerful enough to do beginner projects, yet not to powerful so as to maim or kill you. The other lathes are too much work to set up. The Jet is out of the box ready, even the one on craigslist. You may want to look at a new one to compare the prices.

For a beginner, it is the best that money can buy. Many magazines rated this Jet lathe as the best that money can buy at that size. You will be unhappy with the sears lathes. they jump around, they are too light for the size wood they accept. The bed is made from pipes, not cast iron. The pipes flex, twist, etc. for a beginner, they cause so many problems that I have seen people use them once and quit because they think they are terrible turners.

Get the Jet.

Brian

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This only machine I would consider in your list for a beginner would be the Jet. It is self contained, just powerful enough to do beginner projects, yet not to powerful so as to maim or kill you. The other lathes are too much work to set up. The Jet is out of the box ready, even the one on craigslist. You may want to look at a new one to compare the prices.

For a beginner, it is the best that money can buy. Many magazines rated this Jet lathe as the best that money can buy at that size. You will be unhappy with the sears lathes. they jump around, they are too light for the size wood they accept. The bed is made from pipes, not cast iron. The pipes flex, twist, etc. for a beginner, they cause so many problems that I have seen people use them once and quit because they think they are terrible turners.

Get the Jet.

Brian

thanks good to know

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should i even bother looking at harbor freight? price is right but is it a sighn of how the machine operates? i hear that grizzly makes a good machine never owned that brand of tool so if anyone has any tips or advise thanks

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should i even bother looking at harbor freight? price is right but is it a sighn of how the machine operates? i hear that grizzly makes a good machine never owned that brand of tool so if anyone has any tips or advise thanks

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The Horror Freight lathe is mediocre. It probably can do a few things reasonably well, such as turn pens or handles, both of which are spindle turning tasks. My first set of lathe chisels, still in use, came from there. Even mediocre tools can have a place in our shops (I know, stone me now). However, this lathe and chuck and motor and bearings and tubes and settings will soon (sooner) fail. You really do get what you pay for! PSA, Delta, General, and Jet all make adequate 10 or 12" mini lathes. Entry price is about $600+ for a quality variable speed small lathe, and that doesn't include tools, chucks, and specialized tools (pen madrel,e.g.). However, you'll probably be able to give it to your grandkids. The slippery slope here is wanting to do more. What's $600 for entry becomes $2,500 for medium sized average to good quality, and then zooms upwards of $5,000 for the best lathes--and that's not including chucks. The day I bought my entry level lather, my tools plus one chuck equaled what I had spent on the lathe. I moaned, in despair. However, I love turning; got over the buyer's remorse, and have bought way forward--ONE USED LATHE AT A TIME. If you'll buy the better quality lathes (used) then there will be a line of people waiting to pick up yours (for what you paid for it) once you buy the next step bigger. Buy the lower quality lathes, and you'll take a loss--every time. In this hobby, the good equipment holds its value!!!!

Hope this helps,

Archie

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One more tidbit, very important, too!!!! NEVER BUY AN OLDER LATHE THAT IS MISSING ANY MAJOR PARTS. I don't consider doors or flaked paint as major. The old lathes are great--if they are complete. You'll spend a mint to find and fit old tool parts. BEWARE!

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One more tidbit, very important, too!!!! NEVER BUY AN OLDER LATHE THAT IS MISSING ANY MAJOR PARTS. I don't consider doors or flaked paint as major. The old lathes are great--if they are complete. You'll spend a mint to find and fit old tool parts. BEWARE!

im thinking of picking up this grizzly lathe on cregs list for around 570 dollers

http://chicago.craigslist.org/wcl/tls/2493129129.html

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like to build make bowls, vases ect...

here a few new ones

http://chicago.craigslist.org/nwi/tls/2503437646.html

http://chicago.craigslist.org/wcl/tls/2502912802.html this one has stand and tools but it is amaller jet is that what i would need for bowls?

Morning,

I didnt look at the lathes in your previous post, but looked these 2 over a bit. Of the 2 machines, the second one, the Jet Mini, is a better deal, I dont know if I would give 1100 for it, more likely 800-900. He has a decent amount of tooling, and they look to be name brand, just cant tell from the pictures. Ive been turning about 10 years or so, and here is my take on getting a first lathe.

Variable speed. This is a highly desirable option. Most Reeves drive and direct drive lathes have a low speed of around 500 rpm or so. Much to fast to do any real out of balance pieces. Slow is your friend for out of balance, and a bandsaw will help with that if you round the piece a bit before you mount it up.

Reverse. I know of no entry level lathes that offer this. This is extremely helpful when sanding bowls and vases. As it allows you to sand against the grain opposite of the way it was cut.

I see all to many people buy small lathes, and then have buyers remorse over their purchase in a year or two. Wishing they had gone bigger, or have VS or reverse on it, and ultimately end up upgrading in a relatively short period of time.

A few questions if I may,

Are you an accomplished turner? Know your way around a lathe, able to sharpen your tools consistently. Do you have the space for a larger full sized lathe, or are you trying to shoehorn a mini, or midi into a crowded shop.

Do you envision doing work that is larger than the capabilities of a small lathe? Larger than 10" or 12"? If so, a mini, midi, may not be the machine for you.

One thing with lathes, is you can turn small on a big lathe, but conversely, you cannot turn large on a small lathe. A 16"+ piece of wood on a lathe is a very large chunk spinning around. And if you plan on selling your stuff, when you get over about 14-16" they just dont sell as well as smaller pieces.

ok, with all that said, I would look past the mini lathes, and get a Delta Midi lathe, with Variable Speed and Reverse, if you dont envision doing anything larger than say 11" or so. They are normally around 600 bux or so.

If you are wanting to do larger work, consider a 14" or 16" Jet lathe with VS and Reverse. This will likely put you into the $2500 range but is so much more machine. 220volt, more mass, heavy duty frame.

Mass and weight are your friend when purchasing a lathe. You will easily spend as much or more on tooling/accessories as what you spend on your machine. Get a couple chucks, some decent gouges, a way to sharpen, face protection, etc, etc. It adds up fast!

Hope this has helped you a bit.

Roger

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im thinking of picking up this grizzly lathe on cregs list for around 570 dollers

http://chicago.craigslist.org/wcl/tls/2493129129.html

Griz lathes, vintage and new, can be a crap shoot. When they work, they really work. I have a machinist friend who can (and has) worked on a number of lathes (among our group of friends). The Grizzly's tend to have more fit and finish issues than others; but, that's not a kick against the Griz product. Many I know use the Griz: it's more bang for the buck. Buying used--well, ask for a live demonstration. Have the seller plug it up and do a simple spindle turning (mallet or baseball bat style (you bring some wood)). Listen carefully for bearings; look intently for waddle or wobble in the headstock. Be sure the tail stock locks down and that the gears work in the tailstock screw mechanism. Belts are not too bad to replace; bearings, however, can be a bear!!!! BTW, the seller appears to be asking high dollar. Six bills would be for an old Delta, Rockler (esp), or Powermatic--which the Griz appears to be a knock-off. Those indeed are the goldie oldies. I would only pay $600 (for a Rockler or Powermatic, maybe up to 750) for one in TOP mechanical shape (cause I could care less how it looked--the paint and few dings don't make a difference to the wood). For that much, a working demonstration that it's all there and working well is in order. My opinion only: YMMV.

Archie

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If you haven't already bought one, you should look at the Delta 46-460 midi lathe. Good capacities for turning things up to 12" diameter and 16" between centers, longer if you buy a bed extension. Variable speed and a reverse mode. I got one and am very happy with it.

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decided to wait to buy till i do lots of research and roger t sugested a few things including uying the 46-460

http://chicago.craigslist.org/nwc/tls/2536848169.html

http://chicago.craigslist.org/wcl/tls/2538957296.html

i looked online the jet sells for around 800 dollers so i would be saving about 300. tell me what you think as a wood turner would you think about the jet or just pass it up for the delta 46-460 and why. same thing for the delta ironbed? And what prices would you pay for eather machine so i can throw a price at them to see if it will stick.

going to see if i can find someone near with a delta46-460 to tinker with it perhaps rockler has one on the floor.

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I'd skip both of those and look at a 46-460. While both of those are variable speed, changing speeds require you to slip the belt between different sized pulleys. However the 46-460 has an electronic variable speed that allows you to fine tune the speed within a pulley range. An illustration on how I use that. I'll turn it down to 1 when checking if the blank has been centered after mounting, or when marking the blank with a pencil. Increase it to 4-6 when roughing out the shape, then up to 10 when the blank has been turned round and the finer shaping happens. Then once I'm ready to sand, the speed comes back down to 2-4.

Also, the 46-460 has a full 1hp motor, which if you're going to turn a blank that meets the capacity of the lathe, that's never a bad thing.

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ok wasent shure how much ajusting i could do on the big jet i knew it was variable but because its older could not find a definate post on how much you can change it between the belts or if i would have to pull the belt off for every speed change. im leaning towards the 46-460 only bad thing is to test it i got to drive into chicago to the rockler store. plus i got to figure out a stand.

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Delta sells a stand you can use for it, or you can build your own. I got the stand and it's been good, but the stems on the casters I mounted it on have started to bend so if you go that route, make sure you casters can take the weight.

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been checking garage sales and auctions looking for a solid cabinet or small table that i can use for a stand that way i can store what i need at some future point just below the lathe.

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post-206-0-18212700-1313412409_thumb.jpgThat Jet 1236 does not have pulleys for speed control. The top lever on the left changes speed while the motor is running. I don't want to imply that I know anything about lathes, though. I just picked this one up last week with a Nova chuck for 150.00 from CL.

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Whoops, my bad. The other lathe he posted does use pulleys to set the rotational speed, I kinda assumed that the Jet was the same. That's what I get for assuming...

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post-206-0-18212700-1313412409_thumb.jpgThat Jet 1236 does not have pulleys for speed control. The top lever on the left changes speed while the motor is running. I don't want to imply that I know anything about lathes, though. I just picked this one up last week with a Nova chuck for 150.00 from CL.

The 12/36 uses an adjustable main pulley. It expands and contracts to change the diameter. FWIW, take off the tin cover every now and again and use compressed air to keep the mechanism clean. Add a light coat of silicone lube to the shaft and it will work fine. Let it get dirty and gummed up and it will give you grief.

Don

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i dont want to got too small then i will not have the option for larger stuff but the delta midi lets me make stuff that is 12 inchest across. and if i want to do long stuff i can buy a extension bed to attach to end. not planing on making huge salid bowls or columns just want to turn bowls/boxes/pens ect.... but if i can get a biger one i can always do small stuff or big stuff cant make big stuff on a small lathe like the tiny pen lathes.

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im thinking of picking up this grizzly lathe on cregs list for around 570 dollers

http://chicago.craig...2493129129.html

I just bought a grizzly G1495 off craigslist - the price was right. Found out though that the tool rest which came with the machine didn't reach around my bowls. But resolved this issue with a large curved tool rest from Woodcraft. Works like a champ.

SQ

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