jschen

Breadboard Ends are they needed?

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I think my next project is going to be building a hallway style table. Rough dimensions will be 20" W x 44" L x 30" H. Haven't decided on the type of wood yet. I haven't built anything with breadboard ends and haven't seen Marc use this technique in his projects yet. Is there a rule of thumb to when you should use them? If you're allowing the tabletop to move by having a "floating" attachment to the apron do you need them?

Thanks

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While you never "need" a breadboard, a table top can always benefit from having one. The question usually is what look you want the top to have. You will need to allow your top to float with regards to apron attachment no matter what you do. The breadboards just help the top stay flat over time. When it comes to breadboards, the first question I ask myself is, "Will it look right?". But because it helps promote top flatness, it is pretty much always beneficial to add one.

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Less of an issue for a narrow, hallway table than for something wider. But always welcome on aesthetic grounds. From Peart's site:

aurora_table.jpg

To my eyes, they give the top more substance without actually having to make it thicker.

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Thanks for the info. I'm not sure I like the look of breadboard ends but maybe it will grow on me as I look at more furniture.

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If you have a fairly rigid framework on your table base and use crosspieces in the middle that will hold the top fairly flat. Just use some sort of tabletop fasteners that allow the top to expand and contract. I finish the top and base separately and put a little wax on the top edges on the base before I re-attach the top.

Big overhangs, loose tops, and breadboards (used for rolling out dough) are where a breadboard end would be useful.

Shaker and Greene& Greene styles look great with breadboard ends .

I like to see clean end grain on a tabletop, but take the time to get a really clean cut and sand every grit so no scratches show when you finish.

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Keep in mind that wood movement typically occurs across the grain. Your breadboard ends will be proud of your table when the seasons/humidity change.

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I recently completed my first breadboard ends with much help from this site. I used a plunge router with a straight bit for the grooves and a dado stack for my tongue. The ends are only glued only in the center 4-6" of the tongue. I attached two screws in each about 6" from the sides but you must make an elongated drill hole to allow the breadboard ends to move with expansion. Here is a pic prior to attachment.

post-6284-0-74974000-1329398892_thumb.jp

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Could someone point me in the direction of how you keep the breadboard end from falling off? I can see how it fits together, but I can't wrap my head around how you keep it in place without limiting the movement of the top.

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Could someone point me in the direction of how you keep the breadboard end from falling off? I can see how it fits together, but I can't wrap my head around how you keep it in place without limiting the movement of the top.

Post #11 (above) explains one way ... use glue for just a few inches in the middle of the breadboard, then secure the ends of the breadboard with screws that run through the breadboard into the top. Elongated screw holes in the breadboard allow for movement, and something like the ebony plugs shown in post #4 (above) hides the heads of the screws.

-- Russ

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With breadboard ends, that extend past the edge, expansion of the boards, wouldn't be noticed, as with a flush breadboard end.

I've thought, if I used bread board ends on a table in my house, I might build it with long breadboard ends, and let it acclimate, before cutting to final length, and finishing.

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