Bobby Slack

Shapton or Chosera?

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Hello friends ... long time no see. I was thinking of buying a few newer stones and Lie-Nielsen sells Chosera stones now.

What are the differences? I always look for F.A.B. Feature - Advantage - Benefit.

Thanks.

Bobby Slack

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The only shapton I've used is a very low (120) grit one. I've used the Chosera 400, 600, 1000 & 3000. I can give you some info but keep in mind that most of what I'll say regrarding shaptons is 2nd hand.

Both Cho and Shapton are VERY hard very dish resistant stones. Chosera are interesting in that despite being very hard they produce a lot of slurry making them nice feeling to use. Chosera and shaptons are both very fast cutting, but I believe I've heard the Chos a bit faster.

Shaptons are splash and go, though some say the higher grit shaptons benefit from a soak. They should not be left in water.

Choseras are soakers though I've heard that some people use the higher grit ones as splash and goes. They are magnesium based stones and CANNOT be left in water for extended periods of time, so if you have an issue with needing to put them in the water each time you use them (vs. splashing or perma-soaking) they are not for you.

Chos are significantly more expenisve then shaptons, but you get a fair bit more stone.

Cho have a tendancy to load/clog when you're doing heavy work on backs (as do many stones), but you can easily overcome that. I cannot speak about the shatpons in this respect.

Both cho and shapton are great stones. The Chos are some of the nicest (in some respects the nicest) stones I've used, but like most stone they have their quirks.

All that said, I went with Sigmas, and couldn't be happier!

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The only shapton I've used is a very low (120) grit one. I've used the Chosera 400, 600, 1000 & 3000. I can give you some info but keep in mind that most of what I'll say regrarding shaptons is 2nd hand.

Both Cho and Shapton are VERY hard very dish resistant stones. Chosera are interesting in that despite being very hard they produce a lot of slurry making them nice feeling to use. Chosera and shaptons are both very fast cutting, but I believe I've heard the Chos a bit faster.

Shaptons are splash and go, though some say the higher grit shaptons benefit from a soak. They should not be left in water.

Choseras are soakers though I've heard that some people use the higher grit ones as splash and goes. They are magnesium based stones and CANNOT be left in water for extended periods of time, so if you have an issue with needing to put them in the water each time you use them (vs. splashing or perma-soaking) they are not for you.

Chos are significantly more expenisve then shaptons, but you get a fair bit more stone.

Cho have a tendancy to load/clog when you're doing heavy work on backs (as do many stones), but you can easily overcome that. I cannot speak about the shatpons in this respect.

Both cho and shapton are great stones. The Chos are some of the nicest (in some respects the nicest) stones I've used, but like most stone they have their quirks.

All that said, I went with Sigmas, and couldn't be happier!

Chris has said it all! +1

Great job on your descriptions, Chris!

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So what are Sigma's? Haven't heard of them.

The only place I know you can get them (the Sigma Powers) is here: http://www.toolsfrom...ath=335_404_403. Lee Valley sells a stone by the same company call the Sigma Select IIs, however, those are a different stone and mainly designed to cut hard HHS and powedered metal - they would probably be less ideal for day to day sharpening of A2 and O1.

The owner of Tools from Japan, Stu, is a great guy - email him with any questions and he'll get back to you with a nice detailed response.

The Sigma Powers, like the Shaptons and Chos, are hard, but not quite as hard. The 1k produces a nice slurly. They are soakers, but the 6k and above can be used as splash and goes, also the Sigs can be perma soaked. They are nice to use and fast cutting. They are also quite reasonably priced for high end stones - much less expensive then the Chos. There are certain things about the Chos that may me be better than the Sigs. The Chos, for example are harder, possibly a little faster cutting, and produce a nice slurry at all the grits I've tried. The Sigs however are less finicky, basically they work easier in more situations, and they are also a more durable stone.

Were not necesarily talking huge differences here, but all the these stone, Shaptons, Sigs, Chos have their plusses and minus. After doing a lot of web research I decided that I liked the Sigs as a whole package the best, and I'm very happy with my decision.

BTW, no connection to the above linked site/store - just a satisfied customer.

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Wilbur sorry it took me so long to answer. I came back from Africa (hiked - is not tecnical - the Kilimanjaro and also had a week of wild life photography with my bride in Kenya).

OK ... going back to your quesiton, I was at the LN website and noticed there was no mention about Shapton stones as usual so I called Deneb and he told me that they switched to Chosera.

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Just noticing that the shapton pro's are largely unavailable right now. Anyone know what's up? Hope it's just temporary.

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Just bought two shapton glass stones. 1000 and 6000 and they work amazing. They cut quick and don't load up that much and when they do all you need to do is splash some water on them and bam your off to the races again.

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+1 to what ChrisG said about the Sigmas. I picked up the set with the optional Select II 1200 as the 1000-range stone, plus the Atoma plate for flattening.

The 1200 is amazing. It's very very fast, leaves a lovely edge on it's own, and stays very flat. I'm coming from Naniwa Superstones, so this isn't a comparison to the Shapton pros or Choseras, but it's the nicest 1000 range stone I've used.

An aside, but the Atoma is much faster and easier to use than the DMT DuoSharp for flattening stones. It doesn't load up and clog due to how the diamonds are placed on the surface, and it's still very fast. Usually three or four swipes on a stone after some fairly long work and I'm at perfectly flat again.

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