Mortise and Tenon Joinery


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The superior mortise and tenon joint

Last Christmas I built a small table using traditional mortise and tenon joinery. The legs were small and rather delicate. I wanted the tenon to be as robust as possible in order to assure a strong joint, I considered a mitered tenon in order to get just a little more wood in the joint and then it happened, duuhhhh …. . .. “Why didn’t I think of that before?”. Develop a box joint within the mortise, so I did.

Here is a video of how I did it.

http://blip.tv/play/AYGz9A0A" type="application/x-shockwave-flash

I named the joint “The superior mortise and tenon joint” one of the key parts of the joint (other than the box joint itself) is the over deep mortise that locks the box joint together. I have done no testing, but in my mind I see the joint offering maximum wood surface area. A definite benefit when tenons of a delicate nature are required, such as with this table and I can’t think of a stronger joint for something big and heavy like you might find in a heavy-duty woodworking bench. I think the joint could also be considered knock-down, by assembling with pegs and no glue.

I make no claims to inventing this joint, but I have never seen, heard or read of this variation of this traditional joinery method.

Tags: video, joinery, mortise and tenon, box joint, how to, the superior mortise and tenon joint, tips/trick

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Slight issue.....states that you have to be a registered user of blip.tv to view it. That may reduce the number of people who will see the video.

LQQK

LQQK,

I was hoping to be able to just embed the video have not figured out that option,yet.

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  • 1 month later...

The superior mortise and tenon joint

Last Christmas I built a small table using traditional mortise and tenon joinery. The legs were small and rather delicate. I wanted the tenon to be as robust as possible in order to assure a strong joint, I considered a mitered tenon in order to get just a little more wood in the joint and then it happened, duuhhhh …. . .. “Why didn’t I think of that before?”. Develop a box joint within the mortise, so I did.

Here is a video of how I did it.

http://blip.tv/play/AYGz9A0A" type="application/x-shockwave-flash

I named the joint “The superior mortise and tenon joint” one of the key parts of the joint (other than the box joint itself) is the over deep mortise that locks the box joint together. I have done no testing, but in my mind I see the joint offering maximum wood surface area. A definite benefit when tenons of a delicate nature are required, such as with this table and I can’t think of a stronger joint for something big and heavy like you might find in a heavy-duty woodworking bench. I think the joint could also be considered knock-down, by assembling with pegs and no glue.

I make no claims to inventing this joint, but I have never seen, heard or read of this variation of this traditional joinery method.

Tags: video, joinery, mortise and tenon, box joint, how to, the superior mortise and tenon joint, tips/trick

BUMP

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  • 1 month later...

Good joint Dryhter. But I gotta tell yer When I was an apprentice I had an amazing master but he had one very annoying habit, if he was across the shop and he saw me do anything stupid, wrong, or, both, the first thing I would know about it would be his mallet, which I still have, flying past my ear or more likely catching me a blow! If he ever saw me take a hammer to a wood chisel he'd never miss. Ok he didn't have plastic handled chisels but, that would have made no difference I'm sure. Incidentally the mallet is more than one hundred years old, and beginning to show it's age.

Pete

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